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Remembered Today:

Home for battered memorial sought


Medic7922
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The demographic is interesting - no officers identified that I can see out of approx 50 names seems atypical of most memorials I've seen.

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I may have found it....... What do you think? It fits in and the memorial is listed as "Lost"

CASTLE LODGE INDEPENDANT ORDER OF ODDFELLOWS (LOST)

INDEPENDANT ORDER OF ODDFELLOWS, MANCHESTER UNITY/ LOYAL CASTLE LODGE CLITHEROE NO 70/ THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 1918/ (NAMES)/ IN MEMORIAM TO THOSE WHO DIED THAT WE MIGHT LIVE/ (NAMES)/ "LET THEIR NAMES BE REVERED"

Physical Description

ROLL OF HONOUR

CREST OF THE ORDER DEPICTED ON THE MEMORIAL

MEMORY OF THE BRETHEREN WHO FELL IN THE GREAT WAR 1914 - 18/ "THEY DIED THAT WE MIGHT LIVE"/ (NAMES)/ THE FOLLOWING ALSO SERVED/ (NAMES)

If you type Edmund Rawlinson (who is on the list) into google - this comes up via the old Channel 4 website for the great war.

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I somehow doubt this is it... the inscription on this memorial is simply ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1918 where as the one you describe goes into greater detail.

Just adding CWGC details.

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I somehow doubt this is it... the inscription on this memorial is simply ROLL OF HONOUR 1914-1918 where as the one you describe goes into greater detail.

Just adding CWGC details.

I realise and appreciate what you are saying, I assume that there was a role of honour, but there could be a memorial too. I would guess it's about the size that an Oddfellows memorial could be. The link beyween Edmund P. Rawlinson being on the Oddfellows thing, is tantalising close !

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I think what may have happened here is that E Rawlinson may have ended up on 2 missing memorials - one being his Clitheroe Odd-Fellows lodge memorial and one being at his place of work. I suppose it is likely that he may be on a local Clitheroe memorial as well.

I would have thought it unlikely - although not impossible - that the Clitheroe OF lodge would have lost this number of men? Also the Odd fellows crest is not featured as has been already pointed out.

As regards the lack of officers on the memorial, it is certainly not unknown for officers to be listed separately. Obviously if this is a company memorial, any officers would have been more senior employees or junior directors.

I presume that these works memorials may well have been ordered out of a catalogue with a list of names provided for inclusion on them . I wonder if there were also subscription funds among the surviving workmates.

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One of the men listed was Peter Hulland who worked at Low Moor Farm, nr clitheroe. So this may help or it may scupper the "Works Memorial" idea.

Attached is a Picture of Peter

post-25326-1256568728.jpg

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Roughly how many of these lads enlisted in Clitheroe - it certainly seems a key place - and perhaps as much as a "centre of gravity" for the Memorial as Central Manchester.

I also noticed that Pendleton is in evidence as a regularly mentioned place name. I think it is close to Clitheroe - could Peter Hulland's farm have been raising sheep? Mills would seem a possibility.

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Roughly how many of these lads enlisted in Clitheroe - it certainly seems a key place - and perhaps as much as a "centre of gravity" for the Memorial as Central Manchester.

I also noticed that Pendleton is in evidence as a regularly mentioned place name. What goes on there. Is it semi-rural?

Not at all. As a Salford Lad, Pendleton is basically the heart of Salford. Now its a Shopping Arcade and flats - but I guess circa 1914 it would have been industry and slums.

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One of the men listed was Peter Hulland who worked at Low Moor Farm, nr clitheroe. So this may help or it may scupper the "Works Memorial" idea.

Attached is a Picture of Peter

Can I use this with the memorial on the website please?

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What other organisations may have had a memorial ? I notice from a brief check on Ancestry that several are of Irish ancestry, could they have attended the same school or church at sometime ?

There are several different regiments and places of enrolment so it may suggest a connecting factor earlier in their short lives ?

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One of the men listed was Peter Hulland who worked at Low Moor Farm, nr clitheroe. So this may help or it may scupper the "Works Memorial" idea.

Attached is a Picture of Peter

Peter left Forton to work at Low Moor Farm, Clitheroe, before becoming a time keeper for the CWS at Chaigley Farm a few miles from Clitheroe.

CWS = Co-Oprative Wholesale Society of the CO-OP....... Hmmmmm????

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Ben Wainwright also seems to be listed on an Addenda to the memorial in his town of birth:

batley_bigimage15.jpg

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There also seems to be a Pendleton on the A59 near Clitheroe. Interesting.

Over 40 years since I've been there but it used to be semi rural. A few Mills and Clitheroe Golf Course

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Could we be talking about a large dairy operation? Cows rather than sheep?

Yes, its a dairy farm and seems to be run at the time by the Co-Op

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Peter left Forton to work at Low Moor Farm, Clitheroe, before becoming a time keeper for the CWS at Chaigley Farm a few miles from Clitheroe.

CWS = Co-Oprative Wholesale Society of the CO-OP....... Hmmmmm????

Low Moor far, is only a mile or so away from Pendleton, Clitheroe. So I think we are hitting the ball park.

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It would seem that the Co-op was and is a major force in dairy operations. Of course the Co-op has also been based in Manchester for many a long year.

Did they have a dairy operation in Manchester that became defunct 15 or so years ago?

We could be looking at the town lads - obviously many of Irish extraction in the working class reas of Manchester - who worked in the dairy and the country cousins who worked on the farms whose cows served the dairy. Just thinking out loud.

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Another missing memorial with links to Manchester's industrial past:

Tootals

I worked in the Newton Heath factory as a kid!

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Just completed the CWGC section of the web site so I will put that up. I was thinking along the lines of a Farming Co-Operative myself. Anyone with access to the 1911 census could do a quick check against some of the men in their 30's to see what their occupations were. Page should be on-line in the next five minutes.

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It would seem that the Co-op was and is a major force in dairy operations. Of course the Co-op has also been based in Manchester for many a long year.

Did they have a dairy operation in Manchester that became defunct 15 or so years ago?

We could be looking at the town lads - obviously many of Irish extraction in the working class reas of Manchester - who worked in the dairy and the country cousins who worked on the farms whose cows served the dairy. Just thinking out loud.

Chaigley Farm was a CWS farm according to this website

http://homepage.ntlworld.com/m.baird2/cws/cwsdairies.html

In Manchester at Irlam - the CWS had up until 15 years ago a Margarine and butter works......

Another missing memorial with links to Manchester's industrial past:

Tootals

I worked in the Newton Heath factory as a kid!

Maybe we should try and locate !

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Just completed the CWGC section of the web site so I will put that up. I was thinking along the lines of a Farming Co-Operative myself. Anyone with access to the 1911 census could do a quick check against some of the men in their 30's to see what their occupations were. Page should be on-line in the next five minutes.

Not in their 30s but the Alston brothers were both working in the cotton industry (the same as their mother and father) one a weaver and the other a labourer. They were both CoE so if a church memorial this may be a clue.

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Are there enough names for this to be a generic regional Cooperative Society memorial?

I think the church connection may be a blind alley given that there appears to be both catholics and protestants represented on the memorial.

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Ian

I agree with the church angle as I realised after my post that there were both RC and CoE men listed. Another thought; this may be a case of a factory memorial where the children of workers were included.

Myrtle

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I would tend to agree with Ian now, discounting the church memorial. There aren't that many names on it for a regional memorial for a labour intensive industry but the CWS farming operation was only started in 1896. Dairy farming possibly isn't as labour intensive as arable farming and as the places of enlistment are quite widely spread perhaps it is CWS dairy farms in "Lancashire" or similar. There are archives for CWS, minute books etc, but I don't think they're available online.

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