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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Wound Stripes & Chevrons, were they worn by officers


hudsonswhistle
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Yes they were worn, but in common with other officers' accoutrements I am sure they had to be privately purchased for application to the uniform.

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A frequently seen canard on fleabay is that the russia braid wound stripe was for officers, and the gilding metal one for other ranks. This is nonsense: the issue was russia braid all ranks, but military tailors churned out 1000s of GM versions, easily attachable and detachable.

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So am i right to say they definitely weren\'t issued.

They were very definately both issued to and worn by Officers, see here for the Wounded Stripes:

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...=wounded+stripe

\'Strips of gold Russia braid, No.1, two inches in length, sewn perpendicularly on the left sleeve of the jacket to mark each occasion on which wounded.

In the case of officers, the lower end of the first strip of gold braid will be immediately above the upper point of the flap on cuff. Warrant officers, non-commissioned officers and men will wear the gold braid on the left sleeve, the lower edge of the braid to be three inches from the bottom of the sleeve. The additional strips of gold braid, marking each subsequent occasion on which wounded, will be placed on either side of the original one at half-inch interval.

Gold braid and sewings will be obtained free on indent from the Army Ordnance Department; the sewing on will be carried out regimentally without expense to the public.'

...

sufficient for two jackets will be supplied to each man.'

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  • 2 years later...

hey guys i wonder if you could help me i found some old ww1 photo and his shoulder at the top my great grandad has a gold braid which goes from the top to his arm pit i think can u please tell me what this is for? thanks natasha x

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Difficult to say without seeing the picture but that sounds a white lanyard. This has been discussed numerous times on the forum: try a search for lanyard.

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  • 2 months later...

Hello List I have read through what has been written regarding Chevrons but mine dont tally with the info supplied

Edward Samuel HAYDE was a Rough Rider and was discharged at Woolwich on the 4t Sept 1919

He was attached to the RH & RFA and on his service record it shows that he had 1 Red and 5 Blue Chevron. How would he have got the 5 please.

Any help thanks Militaryhound

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Each chevron was issued at the START of each year of overseas service. So an original B.E.F. man at Mons who landed on, say, 16-8-1914 and who stayed overseas (with a bit of leave) to the bitter end could have his entitlement as follows:

16-8-1914 : Entitled to red chevron for 1914 *

16-8-1915 : Entitled 1st blue chevron *

16-8-1916 : Entitled 2nd blue chevron *

16-8-1917 : Entitled 3rd blue chevron *

16-8-1918 : Entitled 4th blue chevron

16-8-1919 : Entitled 5th blue chevron

* These chevrons would have been issued in early 1918 since the chevrons were first issued in 1918 and back-dated.

Men with this entitlement were a rare breed indeed!

Steve.

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Thank you for your help

militaryhound

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