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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Surprise in Manchester


GlenBanna
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I have just got back from my first visit to Manchester after taking my daughter to University. We were staying in the Britannia Hotel in Portland Street. After a good meal on Friday night we came back to the hotel and I was taken aback when we entered the front porch as I looked to my right there was a war memorial statue. I had not noticed it earlier as I was carrying so much luggage. I didnt have a camera so I apoligise for the photo (with my mobile phone at 11.30 at night). It is one of the most powerful statues I have come across. Look at the trousers or are they waders or trousers?. Does anyone know anything about this memorial.

Glen

post-33800-1253476567.jpg

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I think it's just initials and surnames.

You can see why he went in for realism...

"At first, Jagger joined the Artists' Rifles, and in 1915 he was commissioned in the Worcestershire Regiment. Jagger served in Gallipoli and on the Western Front, and was wounded three times. He was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry."

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On the outbreak of the Great War, in 1914, Charles Sargeant Jagger (born 1885), then a young sculptor studying in London and Rome, joined the Artists Rifles, from whence he was appointed to a commission in the Worcestershire Regiment. He served with the 4th Battalion in Gallipoli, where he was wounded, and afterwards with the 2nd Battalion in France and Flanders. In April, 1918, be commanded “D” Company of that Battalion during the defence of Neuve Eglise, and fought with great gallantry, stopping the enemy’s advance and successfully bringing the remnants of his Company out of action after the troops on his right and left had been overwhelmed. He was again wounded in that battle, and his bravery was rewarded with the Military Cross.

(So, yes 88th Brigade in 29th Division)

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Do you know if the building was a hotel whe the memorial was erected?

No. It was the warehouse, sales room and offices of S & J Watts - one of the city's major textile employers. Noit for nothing was that part of the city known as Cottonopolis.

The building escaped major damage during the Blitz, although many surrounding buildings (including my grandfather's company offices) were destroyed. It became a hotel in the early 1980s.

John

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