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Remembered Today:

Researching Australian Soldier


Kai Mahoney
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Hi fellow members

I have a birthday coming up (14) and hounded my parents to buy me a large certificate that was in a big antique place near where we live. It is for a soldier who was disabled in the great war and discharged with honour on 09/04/1918

My first chance in ages to get something more than a button :D

I have tried to do my own homework, but think maybe I need to check about it.

His name on the certificate is A.W.Macaulay A.I.F.

I tried a search and found Adam, William, Leslie Macaulay, would you experts agree this is him?

I tried more research and found an Adam Macaulay, Private, 4th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery A.I.F. but it says he had a court martial on 25/07/17 :ph34r::o

Is'nt a court martial for crims? I think I must have got it all wrong.

HELP!!!

Kai

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Kai,

How about this soldier?

http://www.aif.adfa.edu.au:8080/showPerson?pid=182550

You can look his records up by a record search in the National Archives on-line and also the research a person function on the Australian War Memorial site.

Good luck and enjoy.

Scott

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Wow Scott, thanks for the help, and also that website link which I've put in my favourites, I'll get right on it.

Thanks again Scott, I'm really chuffed.

Kai

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No worries Kai.

Scott.

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G'day Kai

I think your man is MacAuley Arthur William [MacAulay] : SERN 2412 : POB Melbourne VIC

You can get his record on the National Archives of Australia site.

He joined on 12/7/1915 in Melbourne and was 26 when he joined up.

He was charged with "Absent without leave from 9.30pm 30/10/1916 till 2pm 31.10.16"

while in France and was sentenced to forfeit 12 days pay and to 10 days Field Punishment No.2.

He was wounded in action in the field on 15/11/1916

He then got sent to England with gas poisoning on 20/11/1916 and looks like he was in hospital for a while as he then developed Bronchitis on 16/2/1917.

In an "Out of Sequence" entry he was also charged 6/6 (Six shillings and sixpence...about 65c in our money today, but probably WORTH something like $50 today) as the cost of replacing his hat, on 29/4/1916

He was discharged "3rd MO" on 9/4/1918. Not sure what that means but probably a medical discharge.

He looks to have been in and out of hospital from his gassing until 10/1/1918 when he was sent home to Australia for discharge. By that time his respiratory problems had developed into Asthma.

He arrived in Melbourne on 9/4/1918 on the ship "Corinthic"

He was entitled to the 1914/15 Star, British War medal and Victory medal.

He was also awarded 30/- per fortnight as from 10/4/18 as a pension.

All these records can be found in their original form in the 26 pages of records you can access on the NAA site.

Hope this helps

regards

Brian

In 1926 his sister applied for the "mothers badge" as his nearest living female relative.

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Could also be:

2032 Macaulay, Alexander 12 Light Horse Regiment

87609 Macaulay Arthur (never left Australia)

Not all gave all their first names in full........

AWL was a comparatively minor crime depending on if the Battalion was in the line at the time (particularly as it was dealt summarily with at Battalion CO level at highest (or was it Coy OC ?)

"3MO" is actually 3MD (Military District) or Victoria - logical as that was his state of enlistment and where his NOK (father) (and presumably he) resided.

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In 1926 his sister applied for the "mothers badge" as his nearest living female relative.

Actually, form was completed by his wife.

He (2032 Macaulay, Arthur William) applied for the badge on behalf of his mother (was she alive at the time?) for himself and for his brother 2189 Macaulay RJ 8Bn AIF.

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Hi Captain Starlight

Re 3MO, figured that out after I posted :hypocrite: The actual reason for discharge was M.U. = Medically Unfit. Poor guy never recovered from his gassing!

Looks like Mum died in 1919

Brian

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Kai,

It might be worth asking the antiques shop where they acquired it from. It could have come from an estate, details of which could give you some clues.

You can also look up battalion war diaries for infantry on the Australian War memorial site if you want to find details of the action he was wounded in. Also well worth acquainting yourself with C.E.W Bean's volumes on the "Australian Imperial Force in France"- they are usually found in larger local libraries.

Scott.

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This has really got me excited, I'm really grateful for all the help, I read through his papers and seeing his own signature meant something to me. I will be on to this all day, and I'm on school holidays now so off to library tomorrow.I sure wish I could get that hat for $50.

Kai

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Glad we could help Kai. Also nice to see today's youth interested in the history of this country and the people and sacrifices made to make it what it is.

Hope you have luck tracing the history of the 6th Infantry Brigade, 23 Battalion, which is what Macaulay was in. He was probably involved in the battles at Poziers and Mouquet Farm which happened a couple of months before he was gassed and which made a mess of the 6th Brigade...look at the stats of those killed and injured there!

Regards

Brian

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G'day Kai,

My name is Sean McManus. I am the grandson of Private 3892 John McManus who served with the 2nd Battalion AIF during the Great War.

I am very proud of my grandfather, as I am of all men who fought in this terrible conflict.

I am making this post to congratulate you on your interest in this subject and wish you every success.

At 48 years of age I learn something new every day and this Forum is the best place to learn and ask questions - I wish I had started my research at your age.

Keep an open mind and don't be afraid to ask for advice.

Best wishes

Pop.

P.S. Happy birthday!

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Hi Kai - HAPPY BIRTHDAY!

I agree with the other pals that it looks highly likely that Arthur William is your man - so just a few personal details that might help you discover more about him:

Arthur William MACAULEY, 2412, 23rd Bn – discharged 9/4/1918.

His parents Daniel MACAULEY & Margaret HEANEY were both born in Ireland, and married in Victoria in 1888

Arthur William was born in Collingwood the following year (1889). [McCauley]

Siblings:

Robert James b.1893 Clifton Hill

Richard Alexander b.1895

Marion b.1898 Fitzroy Nth

Edmund b.1902 Fitzroy Nth

Arthur [MacAulay] married Mary Heaton DARKE in 1922

She died in 1947 at Parkville, age 55

Arthur died in 1971 at Heidelberg, age 82

[some name variations: MACAULEY, MCAULEY, MCCAULEY, MACAULAY, MCAULAY etc]

Haven't discovered where he's buried yet (not at Springvale or Fawkner - and if he's buried at Heidelberg, then he doesn't have war plaque, because I've photographed all those) - but if I come across him in my travels I'll get you a photo.

Good luck with your search

Cheers, Frev

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Glad we could help Kai. Also nice to see today's youth interested in the history of this country and the people and sacrifices made to make it what it is.

Hope you have luck tracing the history of the 6th Infantry Division, 23 Battalion, which is what Macaulay was in. He was probably involved in the battles at Ponziers and Mouquet Farm which happened a couple of months before he was gassed and which made a mess of the 6th Division...look at the stats of those killed and injured there!

Regards

Brian

23 Ban was 6 Bde part of the 2Divisions AIF for the duration of the war. Obviously a typo.

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I note that Arthur William MACAULEY had contact with the Repatriation Department in 1919 (?)

It may be possible that there was more extensive contact (ie claim for disability pension and ultimately service pension (equivalent of old age pension)).

If so then National Archives Australia (NAA) may have (actually should have) his medical file from his treatment from the Department (including any hospitalisation or outpatient treatment at say RGH Heidelberg). While the Pension files were destroyed within around seven or ten years of death from memory, medical files should have been held onto indefinitely. If so, there may be a claim for a funeral grant which will include details of undertaker and place buried.

Repatriation Department is now Department of Veterans' Affairs (DVA).

NAA are the custodian of such records and should be first "port of call" if you wish to access (though DVA would be a fall back). They should by now be beyond any restrictions (for this case).

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It's amazing to get all this help and support and just what the members here can do for each other, I would really appreciate knowing where to find his grave, if I can I will visit it.

Scott thanks again for your help - the booklet is fantastic, I have learnt so much here with this certificate in finding out how to do proper research.

My birthday is'nt until 4th November but I was terrified someone else would buy it after I had been visiting it for the last 3 weeks. I asked my dad if he thought it would be alright to hide it behind the big pile of old paintings on the floor instead of being on the wall where everyone could see it, he collects old car badges and understands so he just bought it for me in advance right there and then. :wub:

I'm off to read the booklet :poppy:

Thanks again to everyone

Kai

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