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Remembered Today:

what happened with the battlefield crosses ?


htk2
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Hi all

Maybe a silly question but the some of the war dead where buried (or re-buried) with a battlefield cross.

After the war these crosses where replaced with the now well known white stone headstone. There is a photo of tynecot (if i remember correctly) in the period when the change was made. My question is what ever happened to the original crosses ??

are they distroyed or are they somewhere kept in some dark and forgotten warehouse ?

rgds

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The original crosses were burnt, I do have evidence of that, I have found large numbers of broken and burn metal name strips adjacent to a couple of cemeteries.

Mick

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Some also made it back to the UK, there a still a few to be seen in churches around the country.

Mick, do any of the metal strips still have names on?

cheers, Jon

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Yes, But is a delicate matter for some Jon so PM me with your question B)

Mick

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Some also made it back to the UK, there a still a few to be seen in churches around the country...

We discussed these a couple of years ago, and funnily enough I was very close to one in Hampshire on Thursday. This one is reasonably secure, but I understand that one or two others have gone missing so, as with the previous discussion, I suggest that we do not name sites.

Moonraker

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Someone (through the WFA?) was undertaking an inventory; I sent her some details of a couple I know of, one in Hants, and one in Herts.

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Agreed regarding not naming sites, I know of two locations which I'm happy to pass information and photos of over to an inventory. I know that at least one of these crosses was saved from a fire as the lads parents didn't want it, the local vicar agreed to keep them safe and I believe they still are,

cheers, Jon

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There is a list on the net, not sure whether it was on the forum that I found it. The cross in the Portsmouth naval base is pretty secure to put it mildly. I used the list to view one at a church in North Yorkshire where it stands freely near the altar rail. The retired priest who was performing some administrative tasks in the church was surprised to hear that there are so few surviving.

Keith

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I too have found the aluminium name tags adjacent to cemeteries and some bear units, partial names and numbers.

I have kept a poigniant "Unknown" fragment.

Regards

TT

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TT as a matter of interest did the names refer to the men in the adjacent cemeteries? The reason I ask is that the ones have found haven't all been located in the cemeteries so it appears that they were brought in from a wider area for disposal.

Mick

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Obviously we get misty eyed about the original wooden crosses but the men of the IWGC must have been delighted to see them replaced by the permanent headstones - keeping the cemeteries tidy and maintained must have been so much easier.

We are lucky to have an original cross in a church in Leatherhead 500 yds from my home. We discovered that the man lived in Leatherhead as a boy but is not named on our local memorials. His mother must have felt his childhood home, the appropriate place for it. I have visited his grave near Arras.

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many years ago when a party of us where stopping at talbot house we had a tour around the house by jacque we where shown a store room that had loads of wooden crosses in it i do not know if they are still be there but who knows. michael

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Brian (Post 9) can you please post a link to the WFA battlefield crosses article as mentioned. I have tried searching the site with no success.

Many Thanks

Norman

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we had a tour around the house by jacque we where shown a store room that had loads of wooden crosses in it

If they are still there, they should be conserved as a matter of urgency

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Hmmmm...interesting. I used to wonder what had become of the WWII crosses. A similar fate, no doubt.

Hi all

Maybe a silly question but the some of the war dead where buried (or re-buried) with a battlefield cross.

After the war these crosses where replaced with the now well known white stone headstone. There is a photo of tynecot (if i remember correctly) in the period when the change was made. My question is what ever happened to the original crosses ??

are they distroyed or are they somewhere kept in some dark and forgotten warehouse ?

rgds

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The cross from my uncle's grave found it's way to the family home but nobody knows what happened to it subsequently.

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we still have the cross from my grandfathers brother who died in 1917 with the Royal Welsh Fusiliers, but ended up being re painted with his brothers details (who had also served in the RWF in the war) when he died in 1948, at present its in a friends garage

matt

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There is one hanging on one of the wall within the Shrewsbury School Chapel. It has been a long time since I have seen it, and can't remember who it commemorated.

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There is fine one near Lincoln, not on the WFA list, but just by Douglas Hogg's famous moat, so though its in a very isolated village, it has gained in interest recently. Should I add it to the list? Should I just offer photos here? Is it really best to keep quiet since WFA seems happy about having a complete list. Let me know if you'd like a copy posted.

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Mick,

Apologies for the late reply. The names and numbers are only partial and the closet I can get is to a man in a nearby cemetery but not the cemetery I found the labels by....unfortunaletly the tractor has mangled them badly....

Regards

TT

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There's one in a church near here to a RWF who died 1918. I also know of another church where some medals are glass framed in a small side chapel. I'm surprised that they're still there! (in June this year).

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