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Remembered Today:

Lt Percy Staden MM AIF


clinchpc
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I would be very grateful for any information you seasoned experts can extract from the attached pictures of my great uncle.

His name was Percy Staden and I can't find anything on him in the usual places - Medal record cards, Service records etc.

The greeting on the back of the full length picture is dated March 1919

post-9068-1250020694.jpg post-9068-1250020336.jpg

Any help, inspired guesses or pointers to possible further avenues of enquiry would be most appreciated.

Peter Clinch

Eastbourne

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This may be your man.From Australian Archives.

Lieutenant--Percy Staden

Birthplace--London

Enlistment--National Park N.S.W.

Mother--Elizabeth Annie Staden.

all the best Gary

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MC winner?

It's an MM (Military Medal) Ribbon. I expect he was commissioned from the ranks.

This may be the MM Gazette:

11346 SUPPLEMENT TO THE LONDON GAZETTE, 2 NOVEMBER, 1917

Australian Force

7096 2nd Cpl. R. Staden, Engrs.

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Well what can I say. Thank you so much for so many informative replies.

A large bell has just rung in my head, as I recall now that my mother had a cousin in Australia and Percy was probably her father. He obviously answered the call and joined up.

I will pursue the leads that you have given me and report back. Mind you it looks that you have found my great uncle in about forty minutes. Very impressive!

Thanks John, Max, Gary and Mike.....

Peter

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Yes, that's Percy's brother Sidney who also must have emigrated to Australia and signed up out there. Another priceless branch to be added to the family tree.

Thank you again for your help.

Peter

Just in passing, there's also a Sidney Staden listed. Born in London too. Also working in telephones. It might be worth a look - possibly another relative???

http://naa12.naa.gov.au/scripts/imagine.as...mp;I=1&SE=1

Regards

CGM

Edit: They both give the same Canning Town address for their NOK. :D

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Hello Peter,

I'm just wondering about Sidney. Do you know whether he resumed his life in Australia or stayed in England after the war ended? It's just a thought suggested by the fact that his records don't show him being returned to Australia. One sheet actually gives his new address as the Percy Road address.

Just a thought.

Regards

CGM

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I'm pretty sure he returned to England. I don't think his health was too good. I'm in the process of researching the family history, so hopefully I will find out one way or the other.

His army career wasn't quite so successful as his brother's Percy was it - perhaps due to health reasons.

Thanks for all your help,

Peter

Hello Peter,

I'm just wondering about Sidney. Do you know whether he resumed his life in Australia or stayed in England after the war ended? It's just a thought suggested by the fact that his records don't show him being returned to Australia. One sheet actually gives his new address as the Percy Road address.

Just a thought.

Regards

CGM

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Yes, I noticed he'd already been rejected as medically unfit before he managed to sign up in 1915.

The Australian army consisted entirely of volunteers, there was no conscription, so he didn't have to fight. I know researchers should be careful not to read between the lines and 'invent' truths which can't be substantiated but when I see a record like his I do wonder whether volunteering took extra courage, beyond that needed by fit and healthy men. Just a little thought.

Regards

CGM

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CMG,

Thank you for your comments. They all help me to build up the profile of Sidney as opposed to his more active or perhaps healthier brother. It's good to be reminded that there was no conscription, so volunteering was quite a bold thing to do. I suspect many people at that time went to Australia for a new life and could have been excused for thinking 'Nothing to do with me what's going on back in Europe - I'm going to get on with my new life', but it seems my great uncles did the honourable thing and got involved.

Amazing the quantity and quality of the Australian WW1 archive isn't it? Even their digital copying seems to be of the highest quality.

Thank you again for your help and interest,

Peter

Yes, I noticed he'd already been rejected as medically unfit before he managed to sign up in 1915.

The Australian army consisted entirely of volunteers, there was no conscription, so he didn't have to fight. I know researchers should be careful not to read between the lines and 'invent' truths which can't be substantiated but when I see a record like his I do wonder whether volunteering took extra courage, beyond that needed by fit and healthy men. Just a little thought.

Regards

CGM

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  • spof changed the title to Lt Percy Staden MM AIF
  • 5 months later...

Wow - i have had this camera for years and on researching the name inside the camera case i have come across this thread. What an amazing find. Putting a face and story to the name is amazing.

8A5E88BD-D814-4264-8442-5ACEA6F94314.jpeg

E06A5E35-95E8-4347-94AE-E790BD21AE76.jpeg

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  • 7 months later...
  • Admin

@clinchpc hasn’t visited the forum since 2015, I’ve tagged them which may alert them to your post.

Michelle

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  • 5 weeks later...

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