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Chunkeroo

MGC

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Chunkeroo

My grandfather was in the MGC in Saloniks. Sadly, all that survived of his service records was his attestation form. He originally joined the Gloucester's, but was later transferred to the newly formed Machine Gun Corps. According to his Service Records, he was posted for training 21st June 1916 and transferred to the Machine Gun Corps 1st September 1916. His mother, Clara, had written in her diary, "Mervyn went to France 26th October 1916". He only said that he served in Salonika, so I'm guessing he must have gone as soon as he done his training in France.

Does anyone know how I can find out which unit he was attached to? I know there were several MGC companies in Salonika. My problem is which one. Do the dates I have give any clues?

Cheers

Clare

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

I once did some research into the 77th Coy MGC who served in Salonika, but don't recollect any mention of this soldier - do you know what his number was?

Ian

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Chunkeroo

Hi Ian

My Grandfather's MGC number was 53916.

Clare

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Guest Ian Bowbrick

There is a whole batch of 77 Coy kmen around the 33000s. Sorry that is not much use is it. I suggest you8 e-mail Phil McCarty or JimP akak Jim Parker.

Ian

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Chunkeroo

Cheers for your help. I am in touch with Jim P and at present I am waiting for a report from him.

Clare

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Guest Hazard

There is a Masonic Lodge called 'Maguncor' which was originally started by members. They may have some records. Freemason's Hall, Great Queen Street, London, WC2

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Staffsyeoman

Unfortunately, our attempts to glean much on MAGUNCOR have not met with enormous success. The lodge - based at Grantham - endured long beyond the existence of the Corps. Its jewel was a beauty - a beautiful enamelled scene of a Tommy seated behind a Vickers.

The other MGC Coys in Salonika were 78 & 79 (also in 26 Division) and 80, 81 & 82 (27 Division)

A 78 Coy Sjt who was awarded a Military Medal for Salonika also had a number in the 33xxx series (33355)

The nearest number I can find in other medal sources I have to hand is a Territorial Force War Medal to 53735 - perhaps not close enough - and he was formerly 2/6th Devonshire Regt. (His MGC Coy was not listed in the TFWM register)

Will keep plugging.

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MartinWills
His mother, Clara, had written in her diary, "Mervyn went to France 26th October 1916". He only said that he served in Salonika, so I'm guessing he must have gone as soon as he done his training in France.

The mention of France is quite simple. Travel to Salonika was often via "Lines of Communicatio" France crossing France to Marseilles and then on to Italy, which was crossed both to the east and by travelling further south, with travel either by train or by foot. Then onward by sea either landing in the vicinity of Albania or travelling round the south of Greece to Salonika.

Hope this helps.

Martin

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Steve11

Last week I looked at the MGC Medal Rolls for the first time and as I was only seeking one person I didn't try to take in the 'greater picture'. On the couple of pages I did look at I noticed soldiers often seemed to be transferring in from other regiments in groups of 4 to 6 - about the size of an under-manned Vickers machine gun team. After training these teams were often sent back to serve alongside their original units, although now part of the MGC.

I would add that the period I was looking at was an earlier one (Regm No's 25000)and it's possible that later on policy changed and the Corps recruited more individuals direct.

The MIC catalogue gives MGC 53916 as Harry M Berry. If this is your grandfather you can download his MIC online from:

http://www.documentsonline.pro.gov.uk/

Click Family History.

Click WW1 Campaign Medals.

Enter the Regimental Number in 'Keywords'.

Some MGC soldiers of similar intake:

Frederick T Gingell MGC Pte 53910 Pro Catalogue Ref: 372/8

Albert S Harris MGC Pte 53911 Pro Catalogue Ref: 372/9

Harry M Berry MGC Pte 53916, Pro Catalogue Ref: 372/2

Frank Hartnell MGC Pte 53917, Pro Catalogue Ref: 372/9

Thomas W Harris MGC Pte 53923, Pro Catalogue Ref: 372/9

Steve

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hmsk212

Hi Clare

The nearest number to your grandfather that I have in my collection is a pair to 53959 Private Wilfred Albert Saunders who served in the 127th Coy. This probably doesn't help much as they served in Egypt plus France & Flanders.

Steve

Steve

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Chunkeroo

Cheers all,

I have my Grandfathers medal card details. I should have mentioned he was Private Harry M Berry, otherwise known as Mervyn Berry. What Gloucester battalions were in Salonika between 26th October 1916 - November 1918? As he originally joined the Gloucesters, is it possible he was in a MGC Company attached to them?

Also, was a lanyard part of the uniform? Attached photo shows Mervyn aged 19 in 1916.

Clare

post-2-1082655217.jpg

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Staffsyeoman

An MGC company wouldn't be attached to an infantry battalion 'per se', as it was a Brigade level asset (the Company's number equated to the Brigade it served with, so as per earlier examples, 78 Coy was the Brigade Machine Gun Company of 78 Bde, 26 Division).

It would be placed in the line at the behest of the Brigadier, but with considerable input, advice, what you will, from the MG Coy Cdr, usually a Lieutenant or a Captain. They would certainly serve alongside infantry battalions, but would not under their control, or formally 'attached' to them. (By the by, this was a cause of resentment towards the MGC, as quite junior officers - as specialists - had authority over seniors on MG matters, e.g. the Lt Col commanding the infantry battalion in the same sector as a gun team could not tell the MGC where to put its guns.

By this stage of the war, with all the Vickers centralised under MGC control, the gunners had to be trained on the gun - in the main back at Grantham in UK - so it is not likely that they would just 'transfer across'.

Looking at the ORBATS 9th Glosters were in 78 Bde, 2nd Glosters were in 82 Bde - but I would be wary of forming a link; it could be a blind alley.

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