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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

The 4.7” Stern-Mounted Naval Gun


ph0ebus

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Hi all,

I am hoping to get a better understanding of this weapon, used on some defensively-armed merchant ships. Am I correct in that the correct name for this weapon was the QF 4.7 inch Mk V naval gun? How many people were usually needed to operate one? What was the rate of fire? I've read 8-10 rounds per minute, but wanted to confirm this was correct. How reliable and accurate were they?

Lastly, on DAMS, how normal or abnormal would it be for the ship's regular crew to operate this gun?

Thanks,

-Daniel

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Daniel

I can offer details of a 4.7in QF Coast Gun Mk 5 (Hogg) if they're of any use

cheers, Jon

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Daniel,

My first ship was a Tribal class destroyer armed with 6 4.7" guns (3 double) and twin 4" HA guns. These however were mark XII.

They had a range of approx 15000 yards and a good crew could get through 14-18 R P M. I cannot recall how many were in a turret

but there wouldnt have been too many as there wasnt much room. I suspect the difference between the mark V and XII would have been in the mountings.

Notwithstanding my rantings, if you google 4.7" naval guns there is a wealth of info and photos on what you are after

David

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According to John Campbell "Warship" No. 33, 1985, some 500 of the 4.7" QF Mk I-IV were allocated to DAMS together with 83 of the Mk VI

It does not appear that any Mk V guns were installed in DAMS but the 4.7" QF Mk V* was manufactured in Japan for use in DAMS. 620 guns were supplied, 24 being lost in transit. Japan also supplied 13 Mk IVJ and 24 stock guns for DAMS.

I would hazard a guess that the crew would number seven men. Rate of fire is more problematic and might depend on ammunition supply after ready-use rounds had been expended.

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Hello Daniel,

There's a pretty good photo of a 4.7 stern-mounted gun at http://cas.awm.gov.au/photograph/J02937 .  I can't help you with most of your other questions, but regarding the gun crew I suspect there would have been a couple of navy gunners, with the remaining members (ammunition handlers) taken from the ship's crew.

Regards, Ralph

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There's a pretty good photo of a 4.7 stern-mounted gun at http://cas.awm.gov.au/photograph/J02937 .

That's a curious looking weapon to my eyes (some googling shows it to be a 40-caliber type and not one of the 45 caliber types). It seemingly has its trainer's station on the left rather than on the right (as is customary). Plus, his scope appears to be over there.

As you may know, the custom was to have trainer on the right, and layer (pointer in USN parlance) and sightsetter on the left.

I can find nothing covering 4.7-in guns in The Sight Manual (1916) that might offer more details on this arrangement.

tone

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That's a curious looking weapon to my eyes (some googling shows it to be a 40-caliber type and not one of the 45 caliber types). It seemingly has its trainer's station on the left rather than on the right (as is customary). Plus, his scope appears to be over there.
Hi tone,

If it's of any help, I think the gun mounting is a type P.4 . 

Regards,  Ralph

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