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2nd Lt RB Penderel-Brodhurst


KevinBattle

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I have today discovered the complete wooden grave marker for this chap in a Church in Chiswick. I can't find him on CWGC under all or combination of surnames. Does anyone have any further information about him? Killed in Action 1st October 1918. Are there others preserved, just how unusual is it to find one?

Any and all info appreciated. Thanks in advance, Kevin

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Hi,

This looks like him

Regards Mark

Name: Bernard Richard PENDEREL-BRODHURST Memorial Scroll

Regiment, Corps etc.: Corps of Royal Engineers

Battalion etc.:

Last name: Penderel-Brodhurst

First name(s): Bernard Richard

Initials: B R

Decoration:

Rank: 2/LT

Date died: 1 October 1918

How died: Killed in action

Supplementary Notes: [Territorial]

Soldiers Died in the Great War database © Naval and Military Press Ltd 2006.

There is also this Gazette listing

http://www.gazettes-online.co.uk/issues/30...upplements/8783

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He is on CWGC

Name: PENDEREL-BRODHURST, BERNARD RICHARD

Initials: B R

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Second Lieutenant

Regiment/Service: Royal Engineers

Unit Text: 82nd Field Coy.

Age: 27

Date of Death: 01/10/1918

Additional information: Son of James George Joseph and Henrietta Lee Penderel Brodhurst, of Churchdale House, Harvard Rd., Chiswick, London; husband of Winifred Hadley (formerly Swain), of 3632, Third Avenue West, Vancouver City, British Columbia. Formerly 13th Kensington Bn. London Regt. and Artists' Rifles.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: V. C. 2.

Cemetery: ST. VAAST POST MILITARY CEMETERY, RICHEBOURG-L'AVOUE

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With regard to your question about how unusual it is to find one, I came across some correspondence dated 1923 at Lancashire Records Office relating to wooden crosses in Prescot Churchyard. In one letter, the stonemason responsible for erecting the portland stone headstones was asking the Sexton of the church if he could arrange for the wooden crosses to be destroyed as per a request from the IWGC

post-1356-1246459351.jpg

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I think that letter refers to graves in UK but I may be wrong.

The one mentioned is a battlefield burial cross (forgive me if not the correct term) and I understand these were offered to next of kin.

In Dumfries and Galloway I am aware of one in Moniaive Church, Five (!) in the Episcopal church in Castle Douglas, one in a churchyard and a further in another churchyard. Forgive me if I don't give away the locations of those outside - I wouldn't want to tempt fate.

So that is a minimum of 8 surviving battlefield crosses in this small region.

You can see these posted on the Scottish War Memorials Project.

\Spoons

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The one mentioned is a battlefield burial cross (forgive me if not the correct term) and I understand these were offered to next of kin.

In Dumfries and Galloway I am aware of one in Moniaive Church, Five (!) in the Episcopal church in Castle Douglas, one in a churchyard and a further in another churchyard. Forgive me if I don't give away the locations of those outside - I wouldn't want to tempt fate.

So that is a minimum of 8 surviving battlefield crosses in this small region.

You can see these posted on the Scottish War Memorials Project.

\Spoons

Hello

I am sure that I remember seeing two on the wall of the outer courtyard of Salisbury Cathederal.I believe they relate to the deaths of two sons of the then Bishop of Salisbury.Unfortunately I don't currently have the details.

Regards,

Bob Norman

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I've been taking an interest in these crosses for some time and a few weeks ago found these NINE on the wall of Deddington Parish Church, Oxon.

post-37838-1246473518.jpg

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Thank you all for your help and I'm embarrassed to say that in all the combinations I never thought to transpose the initials, assuming (doh!!) that the battlefield memorial would be correct. It also explains the connection to W4.

Having discussed this with the vicar, he would like to know if there are any descendants of the Penderel-Brodhursts surviving?

I believe this may be the grandson of James Penderel-Brodhurst, the noted author and one time editor of the Guardian, writing on English Furniture, Edward VII and Charles II. The Charles II connection goes back to when the 5 Penderell brothers aided the escape of Charles II from the Roundheads aftter his defeat at the Battle of Worcester 1651. During that period was the fabled hiding in an oak tree (hence the pub name "The Royal Oak" - and the Penderel Oak in High Holborn).

Following the restoration of the monarchy, Charles awarded the family with the Pendrell Annuity until the line became extinct. Has that happened?

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