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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

TIGNE HOSPITAL - MALTA


Pubsman

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Hi,

My Grandfather was in the RAMC (as a Ward Orderly I guess) and based in Tigne Hospital in Malta. I am trying to put together as much as I can about his time there. I have some pictures of him on the island and a couple of certificates he earned whilst there. I am going to Malta on holiday next week and was wondering if anyone can help with pointing me in the direction of the cemetries where those who had died at Tigne may have been buried as he always used to talk about going to the funerals and the problems with digging graves in the rock. Also, any info on Tigne hospital in general would be most welcome.

Thanks

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Hello

I think most of those who died at the hospital would have been buried in Pieta Military Cemetery.

If you go to the link below you can download a free leaflet detailing the Malta War Cemeteries.

http://www.cwgc.org/admin/files/cwgc_malta.pdf

The link below gives directions to Pieta.

http://www.cwgc.org/search/cemetery_detail...1200&mode=1

Cheers

Mick

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I was looking for a photo of Pembroke Hospital in Malta and stumbled across this site, which has an illustration of Pembroke Barracks. I don't know if Tigne Hospital looks like Zabbar Hospital, but out of interest, here is the link, along with more period images from Malta:

http://images.google.co.uk/imgres?imgurl=h...sa%3DN%26um%3D1

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Hello IWG !

It is a shame that I will not be available next week, as I would have offered to meet up with you. How long will you be over here for ?

Unfortunately, the converted barracks that made up Tigne Military Hospital no longer exist. The whole area has been redeveloped - although a few architectual features have been preserved.

With regards the cemeteries where casualties from Tigne Hospital were buried, the standard proceedure was for non-catholics were taken to Pieta Military Cemetery and catholics to the Military Section in the Addolorata Cemetery.

Please feel free to PM me with your email address and I will provide further information AND photos.

Regards

Wayne

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Hello Kate !

Please forgive me, but technically speaking, there was no such place as PEMBROKE military Hospital. In fact, the whole area, known as Pembroke, housed of a number of individual hospitals. As such, it was not feasible to photograph them all in one shot.

Therefore, you need to look up those individual hospitals located in this area:

1: St George's - comprised of converted military barracks.

2: St. Andrew's - comprised of converted military barracks.

3: St. Patrick's - comprised of tents.

4: St. David's - comprised of tents.

5: St. Paul's - comprised of imported timber huts.

Hope this helps. Please feel free to contact me if you require further assistance.

Regards

Wayne

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Thankyou Wayne.

The hospital I have in mind is David’s Camp Hospital, where the Harmony Boys concert party, led by Pte H G Hughes 56993 of 30th FA (a professional entertainer whose stage name was James Verner) devised shows for the patients.

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Kate,

St. David's Convalescent Camp Hospital was comprised of tents. It just so happens that I recently obtained a photo showing part of this hospital. How much will a copy be for you ? ............ just a simple email address sent via PM !!!

Regards

Wayne

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Hi Wayne,

Thanks for the various replies. I am coming out on Tuesday 30th next week and will be there for two weeks. I tried to send you a PM with my email but could not manage it. The system came up with an error. You can contact me on gilsamkin@tiscali.co.uk if you wish as I would like to see the photos you mention. If you like I could bring the few bits and pieces I have with me to let you see them.

Ian

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IWG

A local member of Norfolk Regiment spent two periods in hospital on Malta. He survived the war and wrote an account of his experience. These extracts deal with his two periods on the island:

"1. Shortly afterwards I was taken ill and sent down to a Salonika hospital which was a big house commandeered by the Army from some rich Greek. It was a beautiful place and I remember it had a marble staircase and wonderful statues although, at the time, I didn’t feel good enough to appreciate the beauty of it all. I was soon put on the hospital ship ‘Dundee Castle’ which was lying in the harbour and eventually arrived at Malta. What a relief to lie in a clean bed and have proper care and attention in nice surroundings, although I was feeling ill. Nobody told me what was wrong but I had the chance to read my medical card and it read para-typhoid. The nurses were very kind and did everything possible to get the patients well and, although there was nobody there from my regiment, I soon made friends and felt a lot better. After a few weeks I was transferred from the hospital in Valetta to a convalescent camp at Ghani Tuffia at the north end of the island where we were allowed out. I used to walk to St Pauls Bay and other parts of the island and was most interested to see how the Maltese tilled the land and pumped water to the crops as there was little water in the hot climate. I soon got well and strong again and was ready to be sent to the base. Incidentally, I had been marked for England but, on a subsequent medical examination, I was found fit enough to be sent to my regiment but was sent to Egypt to Sidi-Bish, about four miles down the coast from Alexandria. "

"2. It was such a scattered affair but, marching, I think we covered the whole of Macedonia by the time that I came away just before Xmas 1916. This time it was malaria and dysentery that sent me down to Salonika to a general field hospital consisting of marquees and tents. It was bitter weather, everywhere was snowbound and, although I was ill, I was reasonably comfortable in a warm bed and the nursing staff were kind and considerate. After about a week I was taken on board a hospital ship and eventually found myself in Malta again. This time at Tigne hospital overlooking Sliema harbour. It was a two storey building and I was on the upper floor so, when I was able to get up, there was a lovely view of scores of ships in the harbour and across to Valetta. Each day I was getting worse until one day I suppose it was the climax. I thought I was going to die as so many did. I called a nurse and she came to me and, after a bit, said, “You’ll be alright.” From that moment I began to feel better and, after about a fortnight, I was allowed up and soon began to feel my old self again. Then I was allowed out as long as I was back at the stipulated time."

Hope this may be of interest.

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IWG

Have found 3 relevant pictures: (Your PM is disabled, by the way)

No 1 - St Pauls

No 2 - Tigne Hospital

No 3 - 'Christmas at Tigne'

post-702-1245944444.jpg

post-702-1245944541.jpg

post-702-1245944608.jpg

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Thanks Chris and the others who have replied already.

I think I may have seen the first two pictures Chris, but I certainly haven't seen the Christmas one.

I guessed my ability to use PMs was "disabled" in some way. As you can probably guess, I'm new to this forum and I can't seem to find the option to enable PMs. Any clues?

Thanks

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Ian,

Your pm system will become available when you have 10 posts.

____________

Thankyou Wayne, and I'll reply in the affirmative to your popped question tonight!

____________

Thanks Chris for reposting your postcards.

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Kate,

Thanks for the info on PMs. I had a look around the information/help pages but didn't see this. I must have been looking in the wrong place! I'll have to get posting.

Ian

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Chris,

I forgot to thank you for the 2 extracts you listed. Always nice to read the first hand accounts I think.

Thanks,

Ian

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Chris,

I have a question re the "Christmas at Tigne" picture if I may.

Are the men wearing the jackets/coats with the "white" lapels medical staff or patients (or something else)?

Thanks,

Ian

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Ian

I think they are wearing 'hospital blues' which was the patients' uniform. There is one chap in khaki who looks to be RAMC.

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