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The First Hundred Thousand by Ian Hay

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dycer

Mike,

I agree.

I've had a Paperback copy for years and it is always worth another read.

George

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Jack Sheldon

Do not forget, he also wrote 'Carrying on after The First Hundred Thousand'. My father and grandfather were great fans of it, especially the chapter concerning the signallers, entitled 'Ye Merrie Buzzers'.

Jack

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dycer

Jack,

In all my years of searching I've never seen the sequel in print,although the original was reprinted as a Scots Literary masterpiece.

George

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Tom Morgan

The title of the sequel is, All In It; K(1) Carries On.

I was surprised to learn that The First Hundred thousand (and the sequel) are available online, as the copyright doesn't expire until 2022. How do they get away with it?

Tom

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daggers

Don't forget the same author's 'The Last Million - how they invaded France and England'. Covers the entry of the USA into WW1. It can be found offered online.

D

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Ken Lees

I have early edition hardback copies of both "The First Hundred Thousand" & "Carrying On - After the First Hundred Thousand".

Inside the front cover of the first one is a small newspaper cutting and portrait photo captioned:

"Captain J.H. Beith, Argyll & Sutherland Highlanders, who has been awarded the Military Cross. He is "Ian Hay," the author of "The First 100,000," the most successful book of the war". Perhaps that will assist to identify which battalion is being discussed.

Perhaps later editions of the sequel were titled, "All In It; K(1) Carries On", but my edition has no mention of that title anywhere.

I haven't read either book, but perhaps I should shunt them up the reading pile.

Ken

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auchonvillerssomme

I was very lucky because inserted into my copy was this.

Mick

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auchonvillerssomme

It almost compensates for the copy of 'Reach for the Sky' signed by both Douglas Bader and Kenneth More I lost in a house move some years ago.

Mick

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Guest

Almost.

That must have hurt. When young, I gave away about 100 photos ,postcards, etc of a ww1 soldier we found when we moved into a house. Now 30 yrs later have identified the man as one of the men on one of my local memorials. Can't remember who got them. Stupid or what?

Cheers Mike

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auchonvillerssomme

The book originated from Mrs Bader who I met when I was a very young Pte at the the Cambridge Military Hospital when she visited.

This is probably why we never ever throw anything away.

mick

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jay dubaya

Wasn't the book based around the 9th (Scottish) Division, which would make it the 10th Bn, ASH. I've got a couple of his books on the shelf

cheers, Jon

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jay dubaya

I often wonder if my Great Uncle Arthur ever served under him

cheers, Jon

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John_Hartley

I'm reading "All in it" online. Is there a view about how much is fact or fiction? Or fact but with the names changed?

There are exchanges between an officer - Angus Mclachlan - and his servant, Peter Bogle. As far as I can establish the only Peter Bogle is Black Watch but I can't find an officer of this name at all which is a bit odd as, in the account, the officer is killed.

Is this one of these accounts where one mustn't let the facts get in the way of a good story?

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dycer

John,

It is a book of fiction.

Obviously drawn from,at the time reality plus the fact,from the author's perspective and wish to entertain,educate,enlighten and serve..

I do wonder how it was allowed to be printed,in 1915,in view of the then censorship laws. :D

But the Book remains, to my mind,a contemporary 1915 Book,of innocent parody,not of individual characters,but how a Service Battalion was formed,trained and initially served,comprising of many individuals.

George

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Guest

How are you getting on with the Jock lingo John.

Peter Bogle-" a hoose painter tae trade " :thumbsup: Braw!

Mike

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Martin Bennitt

I have a paperback edition of 'The First Hundred Thousand' which I read and enjoyed at the time I bought it. Then I read it again after learning that one of my family was mortally wounded with a 9th Division battalion (Seaforths, not Argylls) at Loos and Hay's description of tha attack really brought it home to me what he must have gone through. A great book.

cheers Martin B

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