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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Observation post in steel


Cnock

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Hi,

German steel observation post in trenches near Armentiers, 1917

Cnock

post-7723-1242844120.jpg

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Very unusual, maybe this construction was a part of a machine?

The door doesn't seem very useful.

Regards,

Marnik

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Something similar (but round) after capture by British

post-9885-1242845592.jpeg

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Marnik,

these steel turrets were also used by Marinekorps Flandern

and were no part of a machine

Cnock

Centurion,

I think I have something similar as You showed, must look for it

Cnock

post-7723-1242849339.jpg

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That's obvious, Cnock.

But i was wondering what the purpose was of a door.

I can't see the advantage.

marnik

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That's obvious, Cnock.

But i was wondering what the purpose was of a door.

I can't see the advantage.

marnik

I for one would want to shut the door behind me to keep that pesky shrapnel out, plus the breeze, plus the light that may show through my observation slit. Protection from artillery blast and shrapnel was the most important reason "all round" protection was provided in the design.

Cheers,

Hendo

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This explanation seems logic, thanks hendo.

regards,

Marnik

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It locks from the inside. Could it be gas proof?

But presumably the OP has a big open (viewing) slot in front that isn't gas proof?

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The door ? To get in and out. It may have been made that size to get out in a hurry if under attack etc.

David

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Steel observation post at Lombardzijde

Cnock

post-7723-1242891657.jpg

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Re the observation post near Armentiers, it does not seem very tall - not tall enough for a man to stand up in. It does not seem very deep front to rear either. Perhaps the lower front was extended forwards so that a sitting man could stretch out his legs?

Another thing strikes me - presumably it was brought to the trench in pieces and assembled on site.

John.

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Another thing strikes me - presumably it was brought to the trench in pieces and assembled on site.

The same thing occured to me with the version in Centurion's photo (#2); it seems incredibly well engineered compared with the Armentiers and other versions shown. Certainly something which, because of it weight, wouldn't have been at all easy to move into position 'ready assembled' and apparently complicated and time consuming - not to mention hazardous under fire - to assemble in situ. I couldn't help wondering whether this was its original function, or whether it had been designed for another purpose (tunneling, possibly?) and adapted for the purpose.

I also wondered where they found Clark Gable to pose for the picture :lol:

NigelS

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The thought occurs that perhaps it isn't an OP but an SP - sentry post - intended to allow a sentry to remain on duty during a bombardment so as to be able to give warning of any attack being launched under cover of the barrage. In which case being able to shut the door would be a necessity.

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The same thing occured to me with the version in Centurion's photo (#2); it seems incredibly well engineered compared with the Armentiers and other versions shown. Certainly something which, because of it weight, wouldn't have been at all easy to move into position 'ready assembled' and apparently complicated and time consuming - not to mention hazardous under fire - to assemble in situ.

It does have some similarities to the Moir prefabricated pill box (see drawing of the mg gun version). This could be delivered and assembled by three people in about a day (usually with the final asembly done at night)

post-9885-1242914809.jpg

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  • 1 month later...

this type was named 'Eisene Jungrau' by the Germans

Cnock

post-7723-1246805323.jpg

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