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What is this guy wearing?


Tinhat47

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Verlinden makes a 200mm resin bust of a British trench raider ... my question is what is the strap-and-buckled head/shoulder covering that he's wearing (not to mention the three white straps hanging down)? I've never seen anything like it. Is this something that really was worn or is Verlinden making things up?

1876.jpg

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I think this is meant to be "silk armour". There is a padded silk article very similar to this in the Imperial War Museum. So he is not making it up, but how much if any use it saw is another matter.

Regards,

W.

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IWM item. Cheers, Paul.

post-14843-1237203315.jpg

Item thought up by the Munitions Inventions Board in 1915.

Mentioned on page 111 Helmets and armour in modern warfare by Bashford Dean, and page 33 Dominating the enemy by A Saunders. It it stated it was isued at 400 per division but was found to be not a usefull as was first hoped, and its protective qualities deteriated in trench conditions.

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Awesome! That's definitely a new one on me.

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Verlinden makes a 200mm resin bust of a British trench raider ... my question is what is the strap-and-buckled head/shoulder covering that he's wearing (not to mention the three white straps hanging down)? I've never seen anything like it. Is this something that really was worn or is Verlinden making things up?

Possibly the three "straps" are meant to represent part of the Dayfield Body Armour? Or something similar at least?

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...amp;hl=dayfield

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Hello,

Whatever it is, the model does not look very happy; or is that a 'killing' face.

Old Tom

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Interesting yellow circular arm patch - from July 1916 onwards it was the insignia of the 6th Leicesters, did any other Regiments use it?

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the three strips could be stiching seams to keep the piece in tough sections to maintain strength ? .

mike.

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I wonder what the thought process was behind padded cloth armor. It obviously wouldn't stop a bullet. Was it supposed to be supportive protection for the physical rigors of trench hopping or perhaps to dull the blow of enemy blunt instruments?

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From the mentioned books it would seem the padding of layers of Japanese silk and silk waste in such 'Yielding' armour deadened the impact of a missile and at the same time clung to it bringing it to a state of rest, and gave about the same ballistic value of protection as a British steel helmet. Silk though soon lost its protective qualities in wet conditions, and the neck armour was costly. Mainly for shrapnel protection but it stopped a 230-grain pistol round tavelling at 600 ft/s. Cheers, Paul.

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Wow ... it was more hardy than I thought (when dry at least!)

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My two penneths worth.

Never seen this outfit before but guess that as we are fighting at close quarters (the "masher" on a short stick), what would the soldier need to be protected from? My guess is that it may have been used to deflect hastily deployed enemy bayonets. To use a bayonet effectively, we need to have enough room to level the rifle and then pull back to thrust - best not to let them get into that position by jumping on them and start swinging your club. Other enemy weapons could be trench spades, lump of wood or similar.

Regards, Peter

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There were, I understand, several large British objective studies on the number of deaths from edged weapons like bayonets, and supposedly the results were that they inflicted very few casualties. However, the British/French cult of the bayonet was so pervasive that the studies resulted in bayonet drill being redoubled! My father's very effective storm unit by late 1916 simply abandoned the rifle, never mind the bayonet. Here is a rather silly idea, an elaborate protection from an ineffective weapon.

However, the idea recalls a precident.I understand that the Spanish, in Mexico, adopted Aztec cotton armor and threw away their heavy iron European armor. The Aztec armor was quilted cotton that had been repeatedly submerged in sea-water and dried until it was encrusted with salt. Just the thing to stop an arrow, which might break through iron.

The Mongols also had silk armor for horseback archers, like a long undershirt; an arrow might penetrate the skin, but not the shirt; it could be pulled out, and the wound would usually be minor.

Bob Lembke

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Padded fibre is not such a unique idea--It's still used commonly---What do you think Kevlar is.

It's a synthetic fabric not unlike Nylon--Kevlar armor helmets etc are made up of many layers of this fabric.

Joe Sweeney

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The Aztec armor was quilted cotton that had been repeatedly submerged in sea-water and dried until it was encrusted with salt. Just the thing to stop an arrow, which might break through iron.

The Mongols also had silk armor for horseback archers, like a long undershirt; an arrow might penetrate the skin, but not the shirt; it could be pulled out, and the wound would usually be minor.

Only true with regard to the short bow. complex composite recurved bows (as used by the Japanese) or the true long Welsh/Englishbow (developed in the Marches) would punch holes through both silk and its wearer.

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The favouite weapon for close quarters was the edged entrenching tool which was usually aimed at the collar bone to disable an opponent. Whether this armour would stop such a blow I wouldn't want to try out! It is similar to the padded undershirt used under the chainmail of the Normans in 1066 so not so original.

Aye

Malcolm

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December 1916 - Holmfirth, Yorkshire.

On sale at Walter Quarmby’s shop in Victoria Street was a body shield made by Harold Siswick of Scholes. Priced at one pound five shillings each, the Safety Body Shield was a layered cloth combination waistcoat which was said to be bullet proof and had been tested with a Webley pistol fired at three yards. The bullet did not pierce the shield and there was no ricochet. It was also said to give protection against bayonets. The shields - which weighed four pounds and two ounces - were selling as fast as he could make them. Following a demonstration in front of the Mayor of Huddersfield, this endorsement appeared in the Holmfirth Express:

“I hearby certify that I, the undersigned, witnessed a demonstration of the ‘Safely Shield Waistcoat’ (as made by Mr. H. Siswick, of the Safety Shield Company, Thongsbridge, and patented by them) at Huddersfield on the 22nd December 1916.

1. The Waistcoat was placed in front of a bale of material offering suitable resistance, and on being lunged at by a powerful man, who weighs 12 stones, with a bayonet, the bayonet failed to pierce the Waistcoat.

2. The Waistcoat was placed against a buttress, and was fired at with a Webley Pistol at a distance of 3 yards, the bullets penetrated, but failed to go through the Waistcoat, and the bullets on extraction were flattened. W. H. Jessop, Mayor of Huddersfield.”

Not to be outdone, the Huddersfield Rubber Company produced the Chemico Body Shield. This was described as comfortable, and also antiseptic and vermin proof. It was claimed to be able to stop bayonets, swords, shrapnel and: “Has been known to stop machine-gun bullets”.

Tony.

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