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Were these ever identitfied and where are they buried


Guest KevinEndon
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Guest KevinEndon

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It reads

We may never know who the soldiers found buried in France were, but one thing is certain - They died with their boots on.

The first world war soldiers' uniforms may have rotted during the 84 years in the common grave, but the hardy military boots survived. And the 20 men were found arm in arm near Arras, Northern France. "No doubt if signifies they were from the same regiment," said archaeologist Alain Jacques.

Roy Hemmington, of the C W G C said "We didn't find identity discs, so its unlikely we will ever know their names. Badges found at the scene show the men served with the 10th Batallion Lincolnshire Regiment. The unit suffered heavy losses in an attack on Arras in April 1917. The commission is waiting for the MOD to allow the reburial of these soldiers. Three other soldiers were found buried in a nearby shell hole, and a sailor was found buried alone.

Could anyone tell me where they are now buried please, as with the 3 others and the sailor,

many thanks in advance

Kevin

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Kevin

they were reinterred at the Point du Jour cemetery. Don't think there were any positive IDs.

Michelle

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Guest KevinEndon

Thank you Michelle and Paul, I will now be visiting the cemetery in a few weeks time to see the graves of these 20 or 24 men. I wonder if the battlefields will give up any more of these mass burials as technology in searching below the surface improves.

Kevin

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Kevin,

the burials and the process of identifying the bodies formed part of a ?Timewatch TV documentary on WW1 forensics about 6-7 years ago. I still have it on video.

The official line was that the MOD weren't going to try DNA testing to identify these men - even though one couple turned up who suspected that one of the bodies might be a close relative of theirs. The degradation and uncertainty of DNA was given as the reason; but since bodies from the Ice Age have successfully been DNA sampled, I suspect the likely cost and implications for other "unknowns" might have been more in the MOD's mind.

Their forensic scientist wasn't impressed by the "arm in arm" angle - I seem to remember she insisted their arms weren't actually linked, but that the bodies were so close together that their limbs overlapped.

LST_164

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Kevin,

the burials and the process of identifying the bodies formed part of a ?Timewatch TV documentary on WW1 forensics about 6-7 years ago. I still have it on video.

The official line was that the MOD weren't going to try DNA testing to identify these men - even though one couple turned up who suspected that one of the bodies might be a close relative of theirs. The degradation and uncertainty of DNA was given as the reason; but since bodies from the Ice Age have successfully been DNA sampled, I suspect the likely cost and implications for other "unknowns" might have been more in the MOD's mind.

Their forensic scientist wasn't impressed by the "arm in arm" angle - I seem to remember she insisted their arms weren't actually linked, but that the bodies were so close together that their limbs overlapped.

LST_164

I recall that the forensic scientist in question was Professor Margaret Cox, once of Bournemouth University and now, I believe, at Cranfield. Some pals have undoubedtly seen her appear on Channel 4's 'Time Team' in the past. She was certainly thorough enough in her investigations during the course of the documentary, and was clearly moved by her experiences. But I guess that she had to stick with her sad and understandable decision; unless firm and uncontested evidence could be submitted with regard to any of the soldiers discovered theywould have to remain (officially, at least) anonymous

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