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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Uniform ID please


deano

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Joseph W. Noon.

apologies if it is Boer War.

post-17978-1236585977.jpg

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He's a member of a Volunteer Battalion identified by the Austrian knot on lower arm and the cross belt with lions head boss, whistle and chain. Possibly taken prior to 1902 as he's got 'jampot' cuffs, but even on the introduction of new uniforms these may have been phased out slowly.

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Earlier I think, 1890s or possibly 1880s. Whilst the Austrian knot was favoured by volunteers there are photos of regular troops also with the same knots and cross belts (usually NCOs, as this man is, and not infantry).

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Earlier I think, 1890s or possibly 1880s. Whilst the Austrian knot was favoured by volunteers there are photos of regular troops also with the same knots and cross belts (usually NCOs, as this man is, and not infantry).

Possibly 1890's but certainly not regular infantry. The only regular units to wear the whistle and chain outside of the Volunteer movement were the Kings Royal Rifles, Rifle Brigade(officers & senior ranks) and Durham Light Infantry whose senior NCO's wore it on their scarlet sash and was known as the "Inkerman Chain".

Regular infantry other ranks never wore the Austrian knot at all, it was a three loop knot known as a 'trefoil'(not sure of the spelling) which disappeared c.1881, cuffs post 1881 were quite plain with no additional decoration for other ranks, even senior NCO's.

Corp's and some cavalry I believe wore the Austrian but no whistle and chain. Cavalry had the 'picker' ornament, but it's size here seems to indicate the lions head boss.

post-7376-1236598607.jpg

1st Volunteer Bn, NF wearing the whistle and chain.

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Regular infantry other ranks never wore the Austrian knot at all, it was a three loop knot known as a 'trefoil'(not sure of the spelling) which disappeared c.1881, cuffs post 1881 were quite plain with no additional decoration for other ranks, even senior NCO's.

Were cuff braids re-introduced or only lost for service uniforms? I have a photo of my Grandfather, taken in India about 1910/11, wearing the RFA walking out blue uniform that clearly shows a knot on his cuff.

Keith

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Were cuff braids re-introduced or only lost for service uniforms? I have a photo of my Grandfather, taken in India about 1910/11, wearing the RFA walking out blue uniform that clearly shows a knot on his cuff.

Keith

The artillery as a Corp's did wear the Austrian knot, as I also have a photo of a RFA lad in India with a mate in the NF. The same knot was also worn by Artillery Volunteers, but not infantry of the line, it's the one defining factor that helps pick out Volunteers among them.

post-7376-1236603805.jpg

2nd Bn, 5th Fusiliers 1878 with the trefoil knot.

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Possibly 1890's but certainly not regular infantry. The only regular units to wear the whistle and chain outside of the Volunteer movement were the Kings Royal Rifles, Rifle Brigade(officers & senior ranks) and Durham Light Infantry whose senior NCO's wore it on their scarlet sash and was known as the "Inkerman Chain".

Regular infantry other ranks never wore the Austrian knot at all, it was a three loop knot known as a 'trefoil'(not sure of the spelling) which disappeared c.1881, cuffs post 1881 were quite plain with no additional decoration for other ranks, even senior NCO's.

Corp's and some cavalry I believe wore the Austrian but no whistle and chain. Cavalry had the 'picker' ornament, but it's size here seems to indicate the lions head boss.

post-7376-1236598607.jpg

1st Volunteer Bn, NF wearing the whistle and chain.

My posting did say "not infantry". The bandmaster of the 1st Dragoons wore a very similar uniform with Austrian knot, cross belt and whistle chain.

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"My posting did say "not infantry". The bandmaster of the 1st Dragoons wore a very similar uniform with Austrian knot, cross belt and whistle chain."

My sincerest apologies to you, too keen to reply.

As far as I'm aware the cavalry had two types of cross belt ornament, one based upon a shield and the othe like a large rose, but I've never seen them with the lions head boss. Yeomanry I also believe wore cross belt ornaments, but again and as far as I'm aware not the lions head boss.

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Thanks Guys, a wonderful response.

So he's an NCO of a volunteer regiment, uniform from 1880's to 1902 ?

Any clues as to the stripes and the crossed rifles?

Dean.

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The crossed rifles indicate a 'marksman'. However in the Volunteer movement a system of 'Best Shot' badges were competed for on a yearly basis and although themselves based upon crossed rifles they had other additonal features to them, but the 'marksmans' badge couldn't be worn with them. The only other shooting badge to be worn with the 'marksmans' badge was the "Section commanders of the best shooting company" badge.

Oh and he's a sergeant, as he only appears to have three chevrons. Had he been wearing four then we were into other things as seen in a recent post on rank badges.

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Thank you very much all,

Dean.

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