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Evacuation Routes


bobshaw
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Shown in the War Diares of several Medical Units are the Evacuation Routes they would have taken. Can any one tell me if this might also be the same route the Regiments took when they were being relieved from the line, or was the wounded given a seperate route in order to avoid any congestion and so get them back to the Aid Posts asap.

Regards...........Bob

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Shown in the War Diares of several Medical Units are the Evacuation Routes they would have taken. Can any one tell me if this might also be the same route the Regiments took when they were being relieved from the line, or was the wounded given a separate route in order to avoid any congestion and so get them back to the Aid Posts asap.

Regards...........Bob

I know that the Operation Orders for the RAMC were extremely detailed. Sanitary Sections, Field Ambulance, Horse and Motor Convoys and ADS were pinpointed and the movement of wounded from one stage to another was highly organised well in advance of any major offensive or attack. Up and Down trenches were identified for SB's and walking wounded and I assume that these would have priority over any uninjured troop movement, to the extent that regimental police would ensure no unauthorised use of such trenches was allowed. Col. Ensor Commanding RAMC, 3rd Division, actually uses the word "flagged" (a word with very modern usage but here probably used in its original sense)

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I know that the Operation Orders for the RAMC were extremely detailed. Sanitary Sections, Field Ambulance, Horse and Motor Convoys and ADS were pinpointed and the movement of wounded from one stage to another was highly organised well in advance of any major offensive or attack. Up and Down trenches were identified for SB's and walking wounded and I assume that these would have priority over any uninjured troop movement, to the extent that regimental police would ensure no unauthorised use of such trenches was allowed. Col. Ensor Commanding RAMC, 3rd Division, actually uses the word "flagged" (a word with very modern usage but here probably used in its original sense)

'connaughtranger' thanks for the reply you have been a great help, I think it has answered my question, it would seem that the route the relieving column took would probably not have encrouched on the RAMC routes.

Regards....................Bob

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This is not an area where I claim any particular knowledge but one of the reasons given for the delay in the reserves reaching the front at Loos was given as trying to make their way against wounded making their way to the rear. Hopefully, that would have been one of the lessons learned for both movements. The medical arrangements at Loos were heavily criticised. Lack of resources and lack of planning, being claimed.

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This is not an area where I claim any particular knowledge but one of the reasons given for the delay in the reserves reaching the front at Loos was given as trying to make their way against wounded making their way to the rear. Hopefully, that would have been one of the lessons learned for both movements. The medical arrangements at Loos were heavily criticised. Lack of resources and lack of planning, being claimed.

Thanks Tom,

Thoughts change again - maybe I was right in the first place!

Regards................Bob

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Hi

If there's one thing the British Army did in the Great War it was learning its lessons, thankfully far quicker than the Germans :) In preparation for the attack opposite Serre on 13th November 1916 all details for the role of the RAMC were in place by 11th. The Medical arrangements were highly detailed, even down to recognising and dealing with 'alleged' shell-shock cases (with Military Police intervention) and how to salvage correctly arms and equipment of wounded men. Numbers of officers and personnel, their positions and their link with the next line of evacuation were set out in detail. After 6.30pm on Y day all DOWN traffic was banned in communication trenches until 4am on Z Day; such movement was to be made "over the open" - a good way of drumming up custom!. FA officers and police were to ensure this. Such was the attention to detail. The draft orders for the 13th November were ready by 22nd October

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