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homerp

MT Companies

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homerp

I have recieved photocopies of my grandfather's war records (burned series)

and am unable to attribute a Regiment or Division to his MT Coy. I would be

greatful if anyone has any information.

My grandfather served as a Pte from 1915 to 1919 and was posted with the

British ASC. According to the documentation, after initial Home Service he joined

the 188th Seige Battery (594 Motor Transport Company ASC) was later

reposted to the 406 MT then the 594 again then the 406; 402; 403; 402; 403;

491; 2nd Corps SMTO and discharged.

As he spent much of this time in France, I am trying to understand what all this

means and piece together an overview of his movements and involvement.

Due to distance, access to information is difficult.

My appreciation for any assistance in advance.

Sincerely

Mel White

(Sydney Aust)

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Chris_Baker

Hello Snowy

Here goes

594 MT Company ASC, formed in October 1915, was initially the ammunition column to the 34th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II Corps Heavy Artillery, and was later transferred to X Corps in the same role. A Siege Park was essentially the logistic back-up to the Heavy Artillery for spares, tools, supplies, equipment, etc.

406 MT Company ASC had a rather similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 27th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to X Corps Heavy Artillery, and later moved to II Corps. {It sounds like 594 and 406 actually switched over...]

402 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 25th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to IV Corps Heavy Artillery, and later moved to the Canadian Corps.

It will not surprise you that 403 MT Company ASC also had a similar history and role. Formed in July 1915, it was initially the ammunition column to the 26th Royal Garrison Artillery Brigade in the UK. When it moved to France, it became the Siege Park to II ANZAC Heavy Artillery, and later moved to XXII Corps.

Lastly 491 MT Company ASC: Formed in August 1915, when moved to France, it became the Ammunition Column to 28th Brigade RGA, and later (November 1917) moved to Italy with XI Corps.

So your grandfather was always involved with the motor transport lugging stuff about for the heavies. Hope that helps you with beginning to trace his movements.

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Sgt York

Snowy,

I think SMTO may have stood for: SIEGE MOTOR TRANSPORT ORDNANCE.

Ronnie.

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homerp

Gentlemen,

thankyou so much for your informative and prompt responses.

After spending too many hours searching sites and noticeboards etc

trying to find info on the various Corps and trying to understand how

this all fits together I must confess I don't understand how the MT's

fit into the Order of Battle.

Spare the ignorance, but it seems the term Ammunition Column

would fit within the Divisional Artillery grouping as in the

57th Divisional Ammunition Column. But then I notice that there

is another group referred to as the ASC such as the

57th Divisional Train ASC.

I also note that when the MT arrives O/S it is often assigned as a

Siege Park to a Heavy Artillary Corps. Does the MT belong directly

to the Corps as a sperate ASC unit or is it part of a division or is

it something altogether different.

I understand the role they played in providing support but unless

I can attach them to some sort of specific divisional movement,

information is very scarce. Any advice would be greatly appreciated.

I placed an order for the book by Young "Army Service Corps 1902-1919"

which may be helpful, but at the moment I'm in possession of information

I don't know how to use.

Once again thank you for your assistance.

Sincerely,

Mel White

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