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big stu

Cranstons of Haddington, Scotland

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big stu

As you can see I'm new to this Forum, so please be patient with me.

While researching my Scottish ancestry I have come across a highly unusual set of circumstances that needs discussion and comment. Seven boys from the Cranston family in Haddington, Scotland served in WWI. Five died during the War and one more was severely wounded through gassing. The family was effectively destroyed and the remainder immigrated out to Australia.

The information that I have been able to discover about the Cranston brothers so far is:

Alexander, DOB 8 Feb 1879, No. 103604, Sgt, Royal Engineers (84th Field Coy), DOD 26 Mar 1918 (MIA) in France, plaque at Pozieres, France

John Buchan, DOB 3 April 1882, No. 5651, CSM, QOCH (7th Bat), DOD 16 July 1916 of shellfire in France, buried at Vermelles, France

William, DOB 20 Jan 1884, No. 645910, Driver, Territorial Force - 7th Seaforth Highlanders (51st Divisional Ammunition Column), DOD 25 July 1918 of wounds, buried at Wimille, France

James Buchan, 1 July 1887, No. 69417, Sapper, Royal Engineers, DOD 18 May 1916 of wounds in Scotland, Buried at Haddington Cemetery, Scotland

Adam Lindsay, 12 Feb 1889, 40808, Pte, Royal Scots Fusiliers (1st Bat), 13 Nov 1916 (MIA), plague at Serre Road Cemetery, France

Further, George McLean Cranston, DOB 30 Sep 1892, No. (1069?), l/Corp, shell-shocked and severely gassed (incapacitated from 1928) immigrated to Australia

Only the youngest, Robert DOB 6 Aug 1899 survived relatively unscathed. He joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 and survived in Australia until his death in 1950.

The Australian War Memorial and the Imperial War Museum have confirmed that this is indeed a very rare set of facts. It would appear that few other families suffered such a loss, yet few if any people know about it. In Australia, if five brothers died and another severely wounded in WWI there would be memorials built to commenerate the sacrifice. Books would be written about them, streets and schools would be named after them, but I cannot find anything about the Cranston's loss in the UK itself. Not even a cairn in the main street of Haddington.

If the facts are confirmed, then I think the Cranston sacrifice should be recognised and acknowledged.

Comments please.

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ian turner

Big Stu,

Welcome to the forum.

That is indeed a terrible toll for one family. Probably they were 'overlooked' having emigrated? Anyway, if you can provide accurate background info tying them together then surely a case for at least local recognition.

Regarding William - you mentioned 7th Seaforth (my grandfather served in that batalion) - I could not readily find connection with him and the Seaforth from the online info - viz:

Scottish National War Memorial:

Surname CRANSTON

Firstname William

Service Number 645910

Date Death 25/07/1918

Decoration

Place of birth Inveresk Midlothian

Other (T.F.).

SNWM roll ROYAL HORSE AND ROYAL FIELD ARTILLERY

Rank Dvr

Theatre of death F.& F.

CWGC:

Name: CRANSTON

Initials: W

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Driver

Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery

Unit Text: 51st Div. Ammunition Col.

Date of Death: 25/07/1918

Service No: 648910

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: XVII. D. 2.

Cemetery: TERLINCTHUN BRITISH CEMETERY, WIMILLE

National Archives:

Description Medal card of Cranston, William

Corps Regiment No Rank

Royal Field Artillery 1936 Driver

Royal Field Artillery 645910 Driver

Date 1914-1920

Catalogue reference WO 372/5

NB: CWGC seems to have a possible scanning error with his number, reading an 8n in stead of a 5?

Ian

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dycer

Stu,

My Family also originate from Haddington.

There is a War Memorial in the Parish Church Grounds and also a Memorial Plaque inside the Church.

I have photos of both but as my Relatives Surname started with S and they served in the Royal Scots I am unable to say if any Cranstons' are remembered on the Memorials.

It may be worth e-mailing the Minister of the Church(or Session Clerk) to check if their Names are recorded.I sent an e-mail to the Parish Church last November(their e-mail addresses are on the Church Web-Site,as are details of burials in the Churchyard), concerning the Remembrance Service arrangements and received a very detailed and helpful reply.

Sorry I cannot help further.

George

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Pighills

Whilst not being able to give you the information you want, I thought you may be interested in this with regard to Haddington and WWI.

My family oringinate from Haddington.

From this website: http://www.haddingtoncc.org.uk/hundred2.htm

1914-1918

In this the second article in our series we look at the years of the Great War 1914-18 and in particular we consider their impact on Haddington and Haddingtonians.

Every bullet has its billet

Many bullets more than one

God! perhaps I killed a mother

When I killed a mother's son.

Joseph Lee (1875-1949)

On Sunday, 28th June 1914, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, heir to the Austrian throne was assassinated in Sarajevo and the so-called civilised world would never be the same again. It is impossible to discover what impact, if any, news of this event made on the streets of Haddington, but it was to prove the catalyst that plunged Europe's major powers into the war that had been threatening for some time.

Great Britain declared war on Germany on 4th August at 11pm.

The call went out for young men everywhere to volunteer to "fight the Hun" and the response was as immediate as (with the benefit of hindsight) it appears inexplicable. Thousands rushed to join the war that was confidently expected to "be all over by Christmas".

Local recruitment was high, while in Edinburgh it is reported that a recruiting booth at the derby football match between Heart of Midlothian and Hibernian attracted good business. The entire Watsonian rugby XV joined up together in the 9th Royal Scots in what was then known as a 'pals' battalion. This recruitment strategy was a feature of the Great War and was aimed at allowing friends, workmates and neighbours to serve together. It was to backfire tragically when casualties were high since whole villages and families could be wiped out in a relatively short-lasting piece of action.

The first Fast Lothian Territorials gathered on the evening of 1st November 1914 and were to leave for active service the following day. They were wished "God speed" by A. J. Balfour MP and Provost George Young and were later piped to the railway station. The 8th Royal Scots (to which the East Lothian Territorials were attached) were quickly thrown into the fighting and suffered heavy losses. Their Commanding Officer, Colonel Alexander Brook and thirty one other ranks were killed in action while 11 officers and 148 men were wounded.

We are indebted to the memories of one veteran, who although elderly, deaf and understandably tearful, was able to give a first hand account of the horrors of those days. It would be inappropriate to edit or change his account in any way:

"Hunger. Cold. Dirt. The noise of gun fire. Lack of food. Suffering. Screaming of the wounded and long delays waiting for the stretcher bearers to get through to pick them up. Just general misery.

Gas was used - people suffered for the rest of their lives as a result, Many limbs had to be amputated, many too high up to be able to attach artificial legs. They were in wheelchairs for the rest of their lives.

Many were blinded. Pay was one shilling per day (5p in today's money)".

Not all problems were big. Practically every serviceman on his infrequent trips home took back an unwelcome little souvenir from the front line: LICE.

DDT was not invented until the Second World War which was comparatively lice free and the misery caused by this all but invisible foe is almost impossible for the non-infested to imagine.

However welcome, husbands and sons back from the front usually found the doors barred until they had undressed completely in a garden shed or outhouse and immersed themselves, if possible, in a tin bath containing a disinfectant (probably lysol).

For body lice, there was only one cure: all body hair had to be shaved!

While horrors unfolded daily in the front line, everyday life in Haddington also had changed beyond recognition. Consternation was caused when one German, living locally, was arrested by the police and taken for internment. Local memories suggest that he was the son-in-law of the then roads surveyor and had been living peaceably in a house, long since demolished, in the Hardgate.

Literally thousands of troops were billeted throughout the town, in the Corn Exchange, various maltings, in public buildings and in private houses. Amisfield Park, now the golf course, was practically filled with wooden huts which provided accommodation for the men of the Lothian Border Horse Regiment, while the mansion itself was reserved for the officers. The old church in Newton Port became a military hospital.

The large sloping field to the left of West Road leaving the town was dug up into trenches as troops practised the art of warfare. Previously it had been a small golf course which many years later led to the creation of "Fairway" when residential building took place on its periphery.

Very few new buildings were erected during the war years but a large wooden hut sprang up in front of the Corn Exchange and was to play an important part in what passed for the social life of the time.

Known as the "Guild Hut" it belonged to the Church of Scotland's Young Men's Guild, but was mainly "manned" by their female counterparts.

Local artistes and their guests would entertain there on a regular basis. One such guest was violinist David McCallum from Kilsyth who went on to become leader of the Scottish Orchestra. His son, also David, is the actor probably most widely known for his role in the TV series "The Man from U.N.C.L.E."

Food was in short supply, and many memories are of long queues for basic foodstuffs and of the excitement caused by rumours (often unfounded) that consignments of certain luxuries were in town. The taste of such delights as pease brose and tea sweetened with golden syrup are vividly recalled by one local resident nearly ninety years on. She has no intention of asking for seconds!

Toys, too, were almost non-existent and dolls were handmade from wood or rags. Clothes line skipping ropes, the occasional ball and peevers completed a picture as far from modern-day childhood as it is possible to imagine.

It is possible to detect a feeling of bitterness or at least disappointment in some of those who lived through the horrors of the Great War. In battle they gave their all, but on the home front their families were subjected to great deprivations. They tell of widows having to fight for promised pensions and of having to rely on the generosity of the British Legion to help them eke out even the most meagre of existences. Families, by today's standards remained large, and rickets, tuberculosis and a variety of fevers afflicted many. Immunisation was not available and milk remained unpasteurised, it would take another war and much scientific advancement before dairy herds became tuberculosis tested and inroads began to be made on an unacceptably high childhood mortality rate.

Snippets

Conclusion

With the war over and a whole generation obliterated, life had changed forever. Haddington and East Lothian limped into what history would later decree the inter-war years, a period marked by hardship, unemployment and conflict but which nevertheless saw the start of some social reforms. The years 1919 - 1938 will be addressed in next year's handbook.

(edited by Bob Mitchell on behalf of the editorial committee)

Acknowledgements

Many individuals have contributed their (usually second hand) memories to this article. Once again Pat Moncrieff has mobilised her 'Haddington Remembered' group to our cause and we are indebted to each and every one of them for their assistance. George Angus has provided the photographs from his large collection and is a willing source of information and advice. Miss M. J. McDonald interviewed the elderly man who is directly quoted in this article. In a year when most thoughts are directed towards remembering the completion of World War Two it is perhaps ironic that we are addressing events of an earlier generation. However, in order to review the century in a chronological sequence and to have the whole thing completed by the year 2000 we feel this deviation is justified. The second World War and events before and after will be covered in future years. Please hang on to your memories and share them with our editorial committee.

Copyright 1992-1997 Haddington Community Council

100 Years Home

and also this (from the same website):

1914-1918 Snippets

Courtesy of the East Lothian (Haddingtonshire) Courier

November 1914

The Government have placed a large contract for Army blankets with the Kilspindie Hosiery Company, Haddington.

December 1915

Motor Cycles for the County Police - Two motor cycles of first class type have now been purchased for the use of the county police. For Haddington the mount is an 8hp Sunbeam, with three speed gear and side-car attachment.

June 1916

Military football match - A friendly match took place on Friday evening in the Neilson Park between teams representing the Highland Light Infantry and the Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, resulting in favour of the former. There was a large attendance of spectators.

November 1917

On Sunday the various churchgoers who use their cars for driving to church were warned by the police that the Petrol Commission had laid it down that this was not a legitimate use of a car. Doubtless this will affect church attendance to some extent. In most case, farmers who have cars have disposed of their horse and trap.

February 1918

Hiring Friday - The annual hiring market should be held today under favourable conditions. Shows etc. have arrived at the Ball Alley. There will be but little changing of situations among farm servants this year, but doubtless, the holiday aspect of the day will be maintained.

"Lest we forget"

After being demobilised in 1919 the local contingent under the command of Major T. B. Mitchell M.C. reached Haddington on 30th April and was warmly welcomed. Only a fraction of the band that left Haddington on that dismal day in 1914 returned.

The record of those who gave their lives for their country is recorded on the War Memorial which stands by the west gate of St Mary's churchyard. The names of 130 men of all ranks are inscribed on it, including 48 from the Royal Scots and 82 of those who served with the Royal Navy.

100 Years Home

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eltoro1960

Hi Stu

I stay a few miles from Haddington and I can confirm that the Cranstons are on the memorial in the Churchyard. Here is a link to pictures of the memorial if you contact Adam Brown who runs the War Memorials Project he should be able to supply you with better photos.

I think the lack of an individual monument to the lads is probably due to the Scottish nature. The Haddingtonshire Courier should however have picked up on this and covered it extensively at the time. The Courier also ran pictures, I have a database at home which I will check later to see if any of the lads are featured.

John

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dycer

Whilst not being able to give you the information you want, I thought you may be interested in this with regard to Haddington and WWI.

My family oringinate from Haddington.

The first Fast Lothian Territorials gathered on the evening of 1st November 1914 and were to leave for active service the following day. They were wished "God speed" by A. J. Balfour MP and Provost George Young and were later piped to the railway station. The 8th Royal Scots (to which the East Lothian Territorials were attached) were quickly thrown into the fighting and suffered heavy losses. Their Commanding Officer, Colonel Alexander Brook and thirty one other ranks were killed in action while 11 officers and 148 men were wounded.

While horrors unfolded daily in the front line, everyday life in Haddington also had changed beyond recognition. Consternation was caused when one German, living locally, was arrested by the police and taken for internment. Local memories suggest that he was the son-in-law of the then roads surveyor and had been living peaceably in a house, long since demolished, in the Hardgate.

Kim,

I'd read this before,but thank you for posting it.

My Grandfather was living in the Hardgate in 1914 and two of his Sons left with the 8th Royal Scots in November.

John Duncan's Web-site has a full History and some photos of the 8th Royal Scots but I don't think Stu will find anything of direct interest from the Web-site.

Unfortunately there is no-one, now surviving, from my Family who could assist Stu's research.

George

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eltoro1960

Had a check of the photo spreadsheet and unfortunately the Cranstons are not featured, they may still however have text articles about them.

John

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big stu

Ian (Turner),

Initially, I also had some confusion over the (slightly) different service numbers, but having now obtained one or two further bits of information I'm staisfied that the service number for William is indeed 645910, not 658910 as recorded by the War Graves Commission.

George (Dycer),

Thank you for the assistance. I found the War Memorial at St. Mary's Church in Haddington, but I haven't located the plaque yet. I have emailed the Church officials at St Marys and I await their reply.

Pighills (Kim),

Thank you so much for the information on Haddington and the link to the Haddington Community Council (which BTW has no email contact). I didn't know of its existence before your post. While I wait to find an address for me to contact them, I shot off an email to the East Lothian Council instead, to see if they're interested in pursuing the matter, which migt perhaps lead to a memorial of some kind being erected in Haddington.

I can't read the names properly in the photos of the Church War Memorial you kindly attached, so I sent off an email to the Church for clarification (see George Dycer's reply above). I did notice mention mention of a plaque or memorial at a local school, perhaps the Knox Institute at Haddington. Unfortunately, I haven't been able to find an email address for them either, so I can't confirm this is the school with the plaque. Does anyone know of this plaque and its location, or maybe someone has a photograph of it?

John (Duncan),

Thanks, John. As you've already read, I've sent off an email to St. Mary's Church for assistance. I want to thank you specifically for the 'Haddington Courier' reference, which has beeen known as trhe Eastlothian Courier since the 1920's. You local guys on the ground sure do know more than some poor heat-stressed Scottish descendent on the far side of the planet! I've sent off an email asking them to search their archives. I've also checked out your own website.

There's such a long journey to go before the true and complete picture of this family's demise is substantiated, but I'm hoping that before 2014 - the centenary of the outbreak of World War One - there might be memorial of some kind erected in their honour in Haddington. After all if no other Scottish family made a greater sacrifice in the Great War than the Cranstons of Haddington (5 sons dead and a sixth severely wounded out of seven who enlisted) then I think this is a story that needs to be told.

Any other leads, tips, pointers would be gratefully received. Remember, I'm new to family history research, I know nothing about the military history of British regiments during WWI and I'm trying to do all this from the other side of the world.

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Waddell

Stu,

A very sad tale indeed. I'm not sure if individual memorials to families with multiple losses were common just after the war, even in Australia. I've just been reading of the five Souls brothers killed in the war who are on the memorial in Great Rissington church in the UK. I think the losses within a community as a whole may have obscured such a large family loss. There was a lot of grieving.

Have you had a look at the Long, Long Trail site to get some idea of the movements of the individual regiments the men were in at the time. It's a good starting point. From there you could track down war diaries and/or regimental histories to sift out further details. Also have look at their Medal Index Cards for further details. I'm not sure where you are up to, but as you are new that's where I started.

You might want to let other descendants know what you are researching. It's surprising what little details are remembered and items that surface.

Also find out if there is a local historical or genealogical society within the area and tell them of your interest. The local boys on the forum may be able to help you more with that.

I wish you luck with your research.

Another sun suffering Aussie,

Scott

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big stu

bump

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eltoro1960

Hi Stu, sure you will be pleased to here that the story fetaured in today's East Lothian Courier.

"A CAMPAIGN should be launched to honour five Haddington brothers killed in action during the First World War.

That’s the view of Stuart Pearson, a descendent of the Cranston family, who is keen to see their record-equalling sacrifice remembered.

“What struck me is that there appears to be only three other families in what was known then as the British Empire to have suffered the ghastly fate of losing five sons,” said Mr Pearson, who lives in Sydney, Australia.

“I believe this is a story that needs to be told, especially as we are currently in the ninth decade of remembrance since hostilities began.

“If no family suffered a greater loss in the First World War than the Cranstons of Haddington, then I think something should be done to recognise it and commemorate it.”

While researching his roots, Mr Pearson was stunned to discover that so many of his Scottish ancestors had perished in the trenches.

Sgt Alexander Cranston of the Royal Engineers was 39 when he posted missing, presumed killed, in the 2nd Battle of the Somme on March 26, 1918. He is buried in Pozieres, France.

Col Sgt Major John Buchan Cranston of The Queen’s Own Highlanders was killed be shellfire at the 1st Battle of the Somme on July 16, 1916, aged 34. He is buried at Vermelles, France.

William Cranston, also 34, was a driver with the Territorial Force who died from his wounds – he lost a hand and sustained a severe eye injury – at an Army base hospital on July 25, 1918. He is buried at the British Cemetery at Wimille, France.

Royal Engineers Sapper James Buchan Cranston, 28, died from infection of his wounds in Haddington after being repatriated from France. He lies in the graveyard at St Mary’s Parish Church.

Thirty-year-old Private Adam Lindsay Cranston of the Royal Scots Fusiliers was posted missing, presumed killed in action, on November 13, 1916.

A sixth brother, L/Corp George McLean Cranston of the Royal Scots, was severely gassed, becoming totally and permanently incapacitated from 1928. He died in Rockdale, Australia, on July 16, 1963 aged 70.

Robert Cranston, the youngest and seventh brother who served in the War, also emigrated to Australia. He was just 50 when he broke his neck in falling down stairs in 1950.

Their father, Alexander Cranston, died from cancer aged 66 on October 9, 1911. He is buried at Hardgate Cemetery. Their mother, Elizabeth Cranston, emigrated to Australia, where she died in 1929 aged 74.

Said Mr Pearson: “I have searched the online records of the Imperial War Museum and the National Archives of Great Britain. Six casualties out of seven sons from the same family – it seems extraordinary.”

Anyone with information on the Cranstons of Haddington should email him at stu art@bigpond.com."

I am going ask my Dad if he knows anything about the Cranstons, my Granny's sister married a Walter Cranston and my dad is still in touch with his cousins. They are probably not related but heh, worth checking.

John

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big stu

John,

There's supposed to be a small plaque of some kind attached to the wall of a school in Haddington, commemorating the family's sacrifice, but I don't know which school. Even if it's true. Do you know anything about this?

One great outcome from the leading article in the Eastlothian Courier is that I've just discovered I've got a relative still living in Haddington itself. Robert Cranston, the grandson of James Buchan Cranston and I've already sent him an introductory email. I guess I'm about to find out what he makes of a brash Aussie launching a campaign 20,000 kms away for a commemorative memorial to be erected about his own ancestors in his own town.

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eltoro1960

Stu glad to see your making progress and found a 'reli', I took some photographs yesterday when I was in Haddington, -2c and 25mph NE wind = John as a snowman.

I will post the low res ones here and email you with the better quality ones, I will make enquiry with Knox Academy re the plaque , they are on mid term holidays this coming week.

John

post-12171-1234011343.jpg

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post-12171-1234011553.jpg

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eltoro1960

post-12171-1234011693.jpg

post-12171-1234011793.jpg

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dycer

John,

Did you check for the Plaque inside the Kirk?

George

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eltoro1960

Sorry George it was shut and no one around mate. The grave digger was supposed to be there but the ground was frozen (from an old boy with a dog).

John

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dycer

John,

Hopefully Stuart will have received a reply from the Minister.

George

p.s.I can "relate" to two Men on the Royal Scots section of the Memorial. :D

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big stu

The Minister didn't reply but the email I originally sent did the rounds and ended up with a gentlemen called Ewen Collins. He didn't identify who he was or what his relationship was with the Church, but he was nevertheless very helpful. He said he would endeavour to obtain copies of the memorial rolls held by the church. He did confirm that all five boys are listed as Killed on various records and also that a sixth was wounded. I'm waiting for his information with baited breath.

I want to especially thank John Duncan for driving to Haddington and taking a number of important photos in freezing weather. Thank you so much John.

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ian turner

There's not more that I can contribute to this thread, but I just wanted to say that this has all the makings of being an important topic, and well done to John for braving the cold. Big Stu - good luck in furthering this cause.

Ian

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big stu

Over a month has elapsed since my previous post and I'd like to share with you some further developments. The information on the Cranston brothers of Haddington, Scotland who served in the Great War has expanded and also clarified. I can now say that out of the seven brothers who served, four died and two were severely wounded (not 5 died and one wounded as previously stated). However the casualty figure remains unchanged with 6 out of the 7 brothers killed or wounded.

The amended summary now reads:

Alexander, (born B 8 Feb 1879), Service No. 103604, Sgt, Royal Engineers (84th Field Coy), DOD 26 Mar 1918 (MIA) in France, plaque at Pozieres, France

John Buchan, (born 3 April 1882), No. 5651, CSM, QOCH (7th Bat), DOD 16 July 1916 of shellfire in France, buried at Vermelles, France

William, DOB (born 20 Jan 1884), No. 645910, Driver, Territorial Force - 7th Seaforth Highlanders (51st Divisional Ammunition Column), Wounded by gunfire (loss of eye and part of hand) Died in 1957, buried in Lauder Scotland.

James Buchan, (born 1 July 1887), No. 69417, Sapper, Royal Engineers, DOD 18 May 1916 of illness (Tuberculosis) contracted while on Army service. Buried at Haddington Cemetery, Scotland

Adam Lindsay, (born 12 Feb 1889), No. 40808, Pte, Royal Scots Fusiliers (1st Bat), DOD 13 Nov 1916 (MIA), plaque at Serre Road Cemetery, France

George McLean Cranston, (born 30 Sep 1892), No. (1069?), l/Corp, shell-shocked and severely gassed (incapacitated from 1928) immigrated to Australia., Died Sydney 1963

Robert (born 6 Aug 1899) survived relatively unscathed. He joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1917 and survived in Australia until his death in 1950.

Further, I've been lucky to have several newspapers show an interest in this story and print articles about the Cranston family and my quest to have their sacrifice recognised. Because of this publicity I have now discovered over a dozen Cranston relatives still living in Scotland that I never knew existed, including the sprightly 100-year old daughter of Alexander!!!!!

I would welcome anyone's comments or suggestions

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Martin Bennitt

All I can say is well done.

It must be very gratifying

cheers Martin B

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ian turner

Big Stu,

Glad you have clarified the history, good work.

Regarding William - I am still intrigued about his service info. 7th Seaforth was a "New Army" battalion (ie. not Territorial) and part of an infantry brigade in the 9th Scottish Division.

Territorial and 51st Div implies a different battalion than the 7th.

Ian

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eltoro1960

Hi Stu meant to pass this info on that I got from Knox Academy.

"

John

Thank you for your email, apologies for the delay in response.

We do have two memorial boards in our assembly hall, one for WW1 and one for WW2. However, of the brothers only James B Cranston is listed on the boards.

I'm not sure how old the memorial boards are, or where the information was gathered from, however I can tell you that each year we lay a wreath at the boards during our Remembrance Day Assembly, and last year we created a display in the school where we tried to track additional information on all the former pupils listed.

Please do not hesitate to contact me should you require any further info. Whilst I don't have much myself I may be able to find out some info from other members of staff.

Kind regards

Nicola"

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big stu

Alf McM (pause), Alf McM (wait), Where are you?

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