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Remembered Today:

Stockport soldier - P.O.W - Cheshire Regiment


nthornton1979

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Hi all,

I am researching a soldier 8594: Pte Thomas Dolan

I have a lot already but there is one thing that is still unclear.

He was a Stockport lad and joined the Cheshire Special Reserves in 1910. These reserves didn't arrive in France until Nov/Dec 1914 but Thomas Dolan was wounded and taken POW in October 1914 (He enterd France20/09/14)

It says on his POW release paperwork he was in the 1st Battalion Cheshires - Is it safe to assume he was transfered to the 1st Battalion to make up the numbers, leaving the reserves ?

Also, He received a Gunshot Wound to the groin and was reported missing in action on the 22nd Oct 1914

Has anybody got any information on the 1st Cheshires actions/whereabouts on this date ?

Many thanks

Neil

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This is from the LLT:

Enlisting into the Special Reserve

The Special Reserve was another form of part-time military service. Special Reservists enlisted for 6 years and had to accept the possibility of being called up in the event of a general mobilisation and to undergo all the same conditions as men of the Army Reserve. This meant that it differed from the TF in that the men could be sent overseas. Their period as a Special Reservist started with six months full-time training (paid the same as a regular) and they had 3-4 weeks training per year thereafter. A man could extend his SR service by up to four year, but could not serve beyond the age of 40. A former regular soldier whose period of reserve obligation had been completed could also re-enlist as a Special Reservist and serve up to the age of 42.

http://www.1914-1918.net/recruitment.htm

He would have been mobilised on the declaration of war and sent out as required.

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Some useful snippets on this thread including this:

There is another angle here - my grandfather was a reservist, having originally served with 2nd Battalion in India until 1910.

He was called back from his job with the Midland Railway in Derby to join the 1st Battalion who were in Londonderry and sailed with them on the SS Massilia from Belfast on 14th Aug, arriving in Le Havre on the 18th. I would suspect there were many more similar cases. Some sources state about 550 out of the Battalion complement were reservists yet entered France on the same day as the regulars.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...re+22nd+October

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Melpack / John,

Great stuff, Thanks for the info fellas

I've spent ages searching through my copy of Cheshire Regiment in the Great war (I bought it after your recomendation John, cheers) and also I've bought a copy of Stockport lads Together.

Looks like he was sent straight into the 1st Battalion when he entered France on 20th Sept 1914 - Not much training as he was only mobilised on 8th August !

His service records have survived and think it says 1/6th on papers before the war. John, Does this look right to you or am I barking up the wrong tree ?

Neil

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Neil

You're barking! :D

I think the only reference to the 6th is that the officer who enlisted him was the Adjutant of the 6th (a Captain Rogers - who I havnt come across before), which means he'll ahev joined up at Stockport Armoury. Our man's service number is 8594, BTW - you've transposed the first numbers. 5894 had me head scratching earlier till I saw his papers.

So, I think we can say that he enlisted in 1910 and was posted to the Reserve. He'll have had to undertake basic training and regular updates (to keep being paid). Something must have prevented him going overseas with the Battalion in August. Maybe he was ill or needed to complete his refresher training?

John

our resident expert

[

Too kind, sir, far too kind. :lol:

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Well done John, You passed my test with the Regiment number :P

(sorry about that)

The gaps are beginning to be filled now

Cheers

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Hello Neil,

You may already know this but here goes anyway:

8594 Dolan.T. 43 Weston St.S.Reddish.Stockport.

Best Wishes

Richard

Well done John, You passed my test with the Regiment number :P

(sorry about that)

The gaps are beginning to be filled now

Cheers

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43 Weston Street! I lived at No.22 for several years during the 1950's. Known as "Newtown" the whole lot was demolished (not before time) during the 1960's.

Ray

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  • 1 month later...

A number of points I might add into the discussion here:

Men of 1/6 Battalion: (According to my info.) In the latter part of the month of December 1914 a number of casualties are recorded from the 1st/6th Battalion and they show the very young age of some of these soldiers who were in Stockport in August 1914, part of the Cheshire Brigade, Welsh Division.

On 10 November 1914 they left the Division and landed in France and on the 17 December 1914 were attached to 15th Brigade, 5th Division, alongside the 1st Battalion. On the 11th it commenced duty in the Wulverghem sector.

Private 8594 Thomas Dolan: His MIC shows he entered France on 20 September 1914 (so not likely to be 1/6th). More likely he was one of those recorded in the Battalion War Diary as joining on 16 October: "CAPTAIN MAHONY took over command of Battalion and brought up 2/Lieuts Napier, May, Woodhead, Carr, Anderson and 248 reinforcements."

On 17th october the Battalion took Voilaines, after being repulsed twice. On the 19th the battalion attempted to take La Bassée, but, faced by strong enemy opposition, were not successful. 'The battalion', wrote Crookenden 'had got nearer to La Bassée than any British or Allied troops were to go for four years.'

On the day Pt. Dolan was wounded the War Diary entry reads:

"5.10 a.m. Enemy made heavy attack, and took the trenches at the point of the bayonet. Battalion retired to RUE DU MARAIS under very heavy fire. Manchesters came up in support.

8.0 p.m. Battalion withdrawn and went in bivouac at last E of RUE DE BETHUNE.

Casualties: Captains Shore, Rich, Hartford, 2/Lieuts Atkinson, Leicester, Greenhalgh missing, Captain Forster, 18 N.C.O.s & men wounded, 200 N.C.O.s & men missing including Sergeant Major.

CAPTAIN MAHONY died in hospital. Lieut. T L Frost took over command of the Battalion."

Like Private Dolan my grandfather (see dedication below) was wounded at La Bassee but was not taken prisoner and returned to England.

"The little village of Violaines occupies an important place in the history of the 1st Battalion" ('Ever Glorious' - Bernard Rigby)

Graham

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