Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Tramping along with an old tin whistle and a wooden toy drum.


chrislock
 Share

Recommended Posts

Does anyone have the words or tune to this famous marching tune that became the official music of the Ypres League in 1920?

Can anyone link me to the actual song being sang, played instrumentally or a song sheet itself? :blink:

Not even sure if the title is correct but it will be close.

I know Major Bridges beat on a toy wooden drum whilst his bugler played a tin penny whistle leading several wrecked battalions out of the hell hole of Mons. The event actually happened in St Quinten on the forced march and is well covered in the Great War paper, " I was there " Part 3 page 99.

Any help here would be much appreciated please. It is such an incredible story!

Best wishes.

Chris.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Brilliant stuff Keith! Thank you.

All we need now, is some who can read music and play a penny whistle and a toy wooden drum. :D

Link to comment
Share on other sites

A quick google has failed to track any actual recording; unless someone knows better?

Keith

Link to comment
Share on other sites

So Tramping Along was written to comemorate the event. Does anyone know what they actually played at the time?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Iain is dead right as per usual. Pete thanks for that but I fear we will have to pay 7 quid to purchase first! I would like to hear it first. Is this possible? Great pics of Major Bridges and his bugler mind you.

Chris.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Major Tom Bridges' performance at Mons helped to advance his promotion to general officer rank as well as to division command. However, one of the less remarked upon aspects of his wartime service was his role as the senior British military officer on a delegation sent to the U.S. following American entry into the war in April 1917. Maj. Gen. Bridges submitted a written proposal to the U.S. government suggesting that America allow its men to be directly conscripted into the British and French armed forces. A concept called "amalgamation" in the U.S., it is not known whether Bridges' proposal was the considered judgment of HMG or merely Bridges' own personal opinion. Amalgamation, whether it involved individuals or battalions, was rejected by America and the issue became a matter of fierce debate during the crisis of March-April 1918. When the American contribution to the war and the performance of the AEF are discussed amalgamation continues to be a volatile subject all these years later.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I believe the tune they played to rally those troops in St Q was "The British Grenadier"

Iain

Which was, I think, originally played on a fife and drum - very appropriate - with a row tow tow tow.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 8 years later...

Hi all

Bringing this back to the top, I picked up a copy of the sheet music at the local car-boot, set me back the princely sum of 10p. Question is will it still be in copyright 90 years on?

 

John

IMG_0159.JPG

IMG_0160.JPG

IMG_0161.JPG

IMG_0162.JPG

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Depends on the date of death of Philip Seeley and Max Darewski, in British legislation; they would have to have died more than 70 years ago for the music to be out of copyright. Copyright 1925 in USA so I think you'd be clear there.

 

Max Darewski died 1929 https://historyme.wordpress.com/2011/08/24/child-music-prodigy-max-darewski-1894-1929/. However I've found a piece by Philip Seeley dated 1953 so it looks as if you're out of luck there - http://copac.jisc.ac.uk/search?author=Seeley%2C Philip.

 

(On the other hand - who'll know? ;) )

 

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...