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Depot Ships, WW1 HMS Tyne


Mark Lyons
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Hi everyone. I am researching my grandfather, Albert Lyons, who was a stoker on depot ship HMS Tyne from the sinking of his previous ship HMS Itchen in July 1917 until his demob in 1919. My knowledge of depot ships is sparce so anything you can add would be very interesting - were they mobile or did the ships they were supplying come to them? Did they supply all the ships needs including ammunition? Would my grandfather have been stoking or might he have had other duties? His wife moved up to Scotland during that time so presumabely he was able to spend quite a bit of time with her. He also managed to play football for Leith Athletic during that period so it doesn't seem he was restricted to the ship that much. Any help very much appreciated.

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Hello Mark - Welcome to the forum.

If you put Depot Ships in the forum's search engine using the "more options", then ships and navies, you will find a great deal of info. from previous threads.

You might also be interested to know that the Grimsby trawler Gardenia took off most of the survivors after Itchen was torpedoed.

Cheers, Terry

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Gunnery & torpedo ratings, H.M.S. ITCHEN.

David.

post-21239-1232749889.jpg

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hi all,

hopefully a picture of hms tyne,my father was on her in 1908 after his stint in the cells.

best regards jamesbow

post-10495-1232781951.jpg

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Gentlemen

I am very grateful for your contributions. Great photographs, particularly the gunnery ratings on Itchen - a real cracker. I am very much obliged to you all. Many thanks.

Mark

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  • 1 month later...

Coming onto this rather late (actually, I was searching for images of HMS Tyne to help out a member of the Victorian Wars Forum, who wanted a picture because that HMS Tyne had been used as a Troopship in 1882 during British intervention to suppress the mutiny of the Egyptian Army.)

Anyway, my searches turned up this image of HMS Tyne from Jane's Fighting Ships for 1919 -post-41251-1236922787.jpg

(Reference link - http://www.pbenyon1.plus.com/Janes_1919/Mi...epot_Ships.html)

Even though she is stripped to the basics for WWI service in the Jane's photograph, I'd say that there seems little doubt that the ship in the image provided by jamesbow is, indeed, the fourth HMS Tyne (1878-1920).

Clearly jamesbow's image shows the ship in an earlier, peacetime configuration - undoubtedly much closer to her appearance as it would have been in 1882 ....

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grant r,

i do have three other photos of tyne if you want them let me know,regards jamesbow

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grant r,

i do have three other photos of tyne if you want them let me know,regards jamesbow

James: I'd love to see them. if you don't mind (along with any info you have regarding date and location) and I could then pass them along.

Post them here, or attach to a PM .... whichever you wish.

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Many thanks, James! I'll pass them along and I'm sure they will be appreciated. :D

Do you have any information about the time-frame of any of the photos?

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sorry no dates, the last photo if blown up will reveal lots of activity aboard her.best regards james

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  • 8 years later...

According to my great grandfathers service record he was a petty officer on hms tyne from 25th Sept 1917 to 24th June 1918, so he was probably on the ship with yr relative Mark.

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13 minutes ago, We won't forget said:

According to my great grandfathers service record he was a petty officer on hms tyne from 25th Sept 1917 to 24th June 1918, so he was probably on the ship with yr relative Mark.

Mark Lyons, the original poster, has not visited the Forum since August 2009.

Edited by horatio2
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  • 2 years later...

Hi Horatio

My distant relation Thomas Charles Tristain RNVR No MC 1481 served on Tyne from 1/6/19 until 18/9/19 as a Leading Stoker.  Apparently the service No prefix MC relates to mine clearance.  Thomas served in the merchant marine as a Leading Fireman or greaser throughout WW1 & was on HM Transport/ Hospital ship at Gallipoli.  Was Tyne part of the post war mine clearance programme using RNVR seamen?  The record shows  "RUN" so he obviously did not like the ship o, location or the work.

Fairchild

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HMS TYNE was a depot ship based at Leith at the time in question. Your relation was actually serving in the paddle minesweeper HMS TOTNES (borne on the books of TYNE) which was employed on the post-war mine-clearance task.

Thomas also served in the RN from 1908 to 1909 (18 months) as a Special Service (SS) stoker, Official No. SS.106720. As SS he was engaged to serve five years in the Fleet, followed by seven years in the Royal Fleet Reserve. However, starting a tradition for his naval service, he twice deserted (RUN) first from HMS JUPITER and then  from the cruiser HMS PHILOMEL. It seems he "did not like" naval service - full stop. Not many men can claim to have deserted three times. His RN record is here - https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D7072517

I note that his RNVR record is marked "F.E." for previous service = First Entry. This shows he did not declare his previous service and desertions - most likely he would have been refused re-entry.

Edited by horatio2
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Certainly his RN service was not distinguished but he did serve throughout WWI as a greaser & leading fireman in the merchant marine at maximum risk if hit by enemy action.  Down below was not the best place to be if torpedoed.  He was a restless personality who spent a life at sea including both wars.  His son joined the Scots Guards and served in the Long Range Desert Group & retired after 26 years in the Guards.  A genetic disposition to bold action  perhaps.  He was also a POW escapee.  

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  • 1 month later...

My grandfather Samuel Taylor  was on HMS Tyne 25/06/1917 he was a stoker any info on this ship ie what part did the ship play in the war.

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  • 10 months later...

Hi All

I am new to this page and also to researching my Grandfather - who also served on HMS Tyne from April 1919 - July 1919

He was also a Stoker on the Tyne - his service number was TS7021 -  his name:  Walter Bradley

My Grandfather enlisted into the Royal Navy in August 1917 and was at HMS Pembroke - which I am guessing was their Training Base. From there he was on board the: Actaeon - then Attentive II where he is listed as Stoker (MCS) and lastly the Tyne where he is listed as Stoker 2

Would the photos above be of the Tyne in that year? also for his service number - what does the TS mean? Any help would be greatly appreciated along with any images of the ships during that time. Was the Attentive II a paddle steamer?

Cheers Lyn

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Welcome to the GWF.

He was enrolled as a Trimmer in the Trawler Section of the Royal Naval Reserve. His TS number indicates 'Trimmer'. He appears to have served in a couple of mineswepers - HMS CLACTON BELLE (based on HMS ACTAEON at Sheerness) and HMS DUCHESS OF KENT (also based on ACTAEON). They were both paddle minesweepers. At the end of the war he was enrolled into the Mine Clearance Serrvice (MCS) and his rating was changed to 'Stoker' the RN equivalent of RNR Trimmer. His post-war MCS service explains his demobilisation in late 1919. During his time in HMS TYNE she was based at Stord, Norway (south of Bergen) as a base for minesweepers.

HMS ATTENTIVE II was the parent ship and base at Dover. HMS PEMBROKE was the RN barracks, at Chatham.

You appear to have his RNR record but if not -  https://discovery.nationalarchives.gov.uk/details/r/D8577752

Edited by horatio2
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  • 7 months later...

Hi - I'm late to the conversation here. I found my Grandfather Ernie Pitt's service record in the National Archives today and it appears that he served on HMS Leander from 19th January to 31st March 1918 and then served on HMS Tyne from 1st April 1918 as a RN Reserve Ordinary Telegraphist at first, becoming a Telegraphist from 6th June 1918. He appeared to serve there until 4th November 1918 when he ended up at Vivid iii (I believe he was in hospital at this time).

The story goes that he was on shore leave at Leith (this must have been late Oct or early Nov 1918) and saw a fellow sailor lying in the gutter, apparently drunk. He carried him back to the ship and caught either spanish flu or influenza - his mate wasn't drunk but seriously ill. While he lost his eyelashes and hair (I think) he managed to survive. He celebrated his 21st birthday from his hospital bed - being armistice day. He always maintained his birthday was 11th November 1897, although his birth certificate declares 10th November! 

Is this sort of story in anybody else's family history too. The story I remember as a child was that everybody else on the ship died of this flu, apart from my Grandfather, although I find that difficult to believe (probably just the additions that a child adds to a story told many years before!)

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Welcome to the GWF

He was a rating of the Wales Division of the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve (RNVR) [Wales Z/3823], not the Royal Naval Reserve (RNR), He did not serve in HMS TYNE but in the destroyer HMS LUCIFER, whose accounting/depot ships were VICTORY X (Portsmouth), LEANDER (Granton) and TYNE (Leith)

 

During his time HMS LUCIFER was in the 1st Destroyer Flotilla at Portsmouth and, later in 1918, operated as one of the Methil Convoy Flotilla on the east coast of Scotland.

 

He earned the British War Medal and Victory Medal but never claimed them.

 

I can find only one possible LUCIFER flu casualty - an AB who died of illness on 7 November 1918.

Edited by horatio2
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Hi Horatio - many thanks for this. Really helpful. I didn't note the difference between the two. 

Can you have a look at the document I have added please? It seems to me to say that he served on the Tyne, but maybe I have read it wrongly. The other ships you mention indeed appear in the document that you have mentioned. Can you explain to me how the Lucifer and the other ships may have been linked (sorry I am being a bit slow here not understanding how the Navy worked) and the entries in the attached document. 

The death you mention too - that could even be the chap that my Grandfather was supposed to have brought back to the ship I suppose?

Another thing intrigues me - you mention about his medals - why might somebody not have claimed them? Probably hard to speculate over, but was it a common practice?

Thanks again,

 

Alistair

Alfred Ernest Pitt war records WW1.pdf

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