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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Lewis Manning - Northants


sallywheeler

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I have discovered that a Louis Manning is related to me. His wife remarried in 1921. The only Lewis Manning I can find who dies between March 1914 (date of marriage) and 1921 is a Lewis Manning killed in action in Sept 1914. This fits with family stories that I has heard over the years but my question is this:-

Would Manning not have to have been a regular soldier to be killed that early in the war? His marriage certificate describes him as a workhouse attendant and the birth certificate of his son, in July 1914, describes him as a brewer's labourer. How could he have got to the front so quickly? What am I missing?

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Sally

There were already some Territorials attached to the first Divisions to cross to France in Aug 1914. Remember that quite a slice of our regular assets were serving in our overseas territories and had only just begun to mobilise back to the UK prior to re-deployment to France and Flanders and Egypt/Gallipoli.

Sotonmate

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Men (usually) joined the army for a standard 12 year stint. Of this the first (usually) seven years was "Active service" i.e. in the Army on a day to day basis. Pre-war service also allowed for married men to live with their wives and families whilst on active service (as is still the case today, of course). The latter part of the soldiers service would have been "on Reserve" - i.e. in their civilian job, with reduced Army pay, and with the obligation to return to active service if required by the Army. The Army recalled these reservists from their civilain jobs at the outbreak of war in August 1914, and many were in France within two weeks.

I shall have a further look to see what I have on Pte. manning, as the Northamptons are my topic of research.

This is our man?

Name: MANNING

Initials: L W

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Private

Regiment/Service: Northamptonshire Regiment

Unit Text: 1st Bn.

Date of Death: 17/09/1914

Service No: 7433

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. K. 4.

Cemetery: VENDRESSE BRITISH CEMETERY

EDIT: Was he from Brington?

Steve.

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Is this him?

post-6536-1226956786.jpg

(Northampton Independent, 24-10-1914)

Number 7433 would have been issued circa late 1904, thus 7 years on active service would be up to 1911, then 5 more years on Reserve to expire in 1916 (actually 1917 as they added 1 more year during wartime to make the total 13 years).

Presumably,

Name: Lewis William Manning

Year of Registration: 1886

Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep

District: Brixworth

County: Northamptonshire

Volume: 3b

Page: 119

From the 1891 Census:

Name: Lewis W Manning

Age: 4

Estimated Birth Year: abt 1887

Relation: Son

Father's Name: George

Mother's Name: Selina

Gender: Male

Where born: Brington, Northamptonshire, England

Civil Parish: Brington

Ecclesiastical parish: St Mary

Town: Great Brington

County/Island: Northamptonshire

Country: England

Street address: Brington, Northants

Registration district: Brixworth

Sub registration district: Brixworth

ED, institution, or vessel: 1

Household Members: Name Age

George Manning 40

Selina Manning 46

Edward G Manning 12

Francis C Manning 8

Lewis W Manning 4

Steve.

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His medal index card:

post-6536-1226958019.jpg

As an extra thing to consider, in the few years after the Boer War, the regiment seemed to take many men on terms of 3 years active/9 on reserve, though Louis/Lewis would have been on Reserve by the outbreak of war in either case.

Steve.

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His medal index card:

post-6536-1226958019.jpg

As an extra thing to consider, in the few years after the Boer War, the regiment seemed to take many men on terms of 3 years active/9 on reserve, though Louis/Lewis would have been on Reserve by the outbreak of war in either case.

Steve.

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This is fantastic, thanks. Great to get a picture, I can't thank you enough. I have puzzled over him for so long. It all fits together, he was married to my great aunt as her first cousin and I had no idea of his existence or their son's existence until a cousin of my father's told him about him. Next time I'm in England I will go to Brington in Northants and see if he is on the War Memorial there.

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