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Remembered Today:

Last ever WW1 medal


Woburn Paul

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http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/england/bristol/7713104.stm

A Bristol man's dedication to his father's memory has led to the Ministry of Defence (MoD) issuing the last ever World War I award to him posthumously.

Apologies if posted elsewhere, I did do a search!

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Well it may well be only a badge but it prooves that the MOD can some times be pushed to doing sumit they dont normaly do.

Dan

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Fair play to the guy for honouring his father's memory in this way but is it possible that the reason his father didn't have a SWB was because he never wanted one, especially as his son is quoted as saying "he always said that he had never served in World War One, and that his disability was caused by an accident" and that "It seemed that he had decided to ignore that part of his life and did not pursue the award due to him".

I was, and still am, under the impression that SWB's weren't issued automatically and had to be claimed, only being issued once eligibility was proven? Perhaps his father just felt he didn't need a badge to highlight the disability he'd have to endure for the rest of his life. It would be interesting to see what proof the MOD accepted and how the "Several military clerical errors" were spotted...

Regards

Steve

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Quite right, badges had to be claimed and it appears that this man did not.

Why would the MOD say last ever? If someone else made a similar claim this week, why would they not respond in the same way?

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Maybe the "last one" because its the last badge they had in stock, or do you think someone was tasked with finding a good condition one and refurbing it?

Can't see them having the original press still? :unsure:

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Will it be the same as the original issue (ie with "GRI" cypher), or will it be a specially made version with an "EIIR" cypher? Just curious because I've had a "GVIR" Canadian Memorial Cross that was named to a 1st World War soldier who died in 1949 of injuries recieved in 1918. I've also heard of an "EIIR" cross being issued to a guy who died in similar circumstances, but in the late 1950's.

Dave.

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It looks to me as if the son's desire to have the badge may have over ridden the father's wishes in not claiming it.

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It looks to me as if the son's desire to have the badge may have over ridden the father's wishes in not claiming it.

I must confess that I claimed my grandfather's Defence Medal, even though I have a sneaking suspicion that after Cambrai and the Kaiserschlact he didn't feel that four-and-a-half years in the Home Guard didn't merit it.

But I did fancy getting something off the MOD for nowt which (knowing his financial position for most of his life) I suspect he'd have approved of.

Adrian

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I must confess that I claimed my grandfather's Defence Medal

I claimed my grandfathers Defence medal for my mother after he died. she didn't even know he was entitled to it while he was alive.

I must admit, I was in two minds about claiming it as he had decided not too.

The thing that swung it for me was the fact that even though he didn't claim it and despite many moves later in life, he kept his entitlement card safe in a place it would be easily found after his death. Perhaps he meant it to be found

Andy

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Mentioned in today's Telegraph (8/11/08) http://tinyurl.com/57cjae

His service record (pension) and MIC (BWM & Victory) appear to be on Ancestry:

Alfred William Thomas Gibbins 1/6th W. Yorks 56698 attested 6/6/16 aged 18yrs 7mths; there is an odd discrepancy which could mean it's not the same man though. The service record says that his left great toe was amputated whereas the the Telegraph article says it was his right (I would have thought that the chances of two Alfred Gibbins, even during the war, both having a large two amputated would be remote?) His personal statement about the injury gives:

Served Belgium 2 months as infantryman

Suffering from trench feet which commenced on Dec 27th 1917 caused through having to wear boots in need of repair while in the line during very snowy weather. This necessitated the big toe of the left foot being amputated.

He was discharged as no longer physically fit for war service on the 8th March 1919 from 2/1 southern TF General Hspl, Dudley Rd. Birmingham with the comment

General health good. wound of left foot is entirely healed. patient walks quite well with very light boots. He is unable to wear ordinary army boots.

Amp of left toe.

Permanently unfit for further service

NigelS

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