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Remembered Today:

ASC - 74th Field Bakery (1916-1918), France


brimacombe

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Another of my Holsworthy men lost in WWI (actually he was discharged and died of TB).

Albert Trace (S4/157909) was a Baker before the war I guess it is of little surprise that he was posted to (I Think) 74th Field Bakery (his attestation sheet isnt very clear, but I'm 99% certain it says the 74th) and went to France 25 Feb 1916 and remained in France with the unit until 15 June 1918 when he was sent home.

Browsing through my library and trawling through the net I have been unable to 1) locate the unit or 2) be able to find hardly any background information regarding the role of the Field Bakery.

Can anyone help? Any information would be of a great help....

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According to the Long Long Trail the ASC were issuing 90,000,000 pounds of bread per month by November 1918.

This is from the Holmfirth Express:

ARMY SERVICE CORPS.

When Honour is divided, and victory is won,

Don’t think the only hero is the man behind the gun,

What corps of men work harder than the happy ASC.

With their labourers, clerks, and butchers, not to mention bakery?

While Tommy’s in the trenches, and Jack is on the sea,

They labour at the bases, and their work is hard maybe,

But you never hear them grumble, though they toil both night and day,

To prepare the food for others who are fighting in the fray.

The baker at the oven toils hard throughout the day,

To give Tommy bread, not biscuit, to cheer him on his way.

It is brought to him by transport, sometimes motor, sometimes horse,

And helps to keep him happy and prevent the heavy loss;

So when the boys come marching home just think of what I say,

The ASC have helped to rob the Kaiser of the Day.

By Private H. Hubbard.

A Holmfirth baker serving with the 47th Field Bakery, Army Service Corps.

Somewhere in France, 1916.

Tony.

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Another of my Holsworthy men lost in WWI (actually he was discharged and died of TB).

Albert Trace (S4/157909) was a Baker before the war I guess it is of little surprise that he was posted to (I Think) 74th Field Bakery (his attestation sheet isnt very clear, but I'm 99% certain it says the 74th) and went to France 25 Feb 1916 and remained in France with the unit until 15 June 1918 when he was sent home.

Browsing through my library and trawling through the net I have been unable to 1) locate the unit or 2) be able to find hardly any background information regarding the role of the Field Bakery.

Can anyone help? Any information would be of a great help....

I believe that a Field Bakery establishment was one officer and 92 men,to feed 26,000.My grandfather(295235) was also a baker,who was mobilised in 1917 ,at 18,and continued to work as a baker in the Army.His "Pension"records show he was sent from the Supply Depot at Bath to 157th Bakery Section at Tunbridge Wells,then,in January 1918 to 17th Field Bakery ,I think at Boulogne.He was quite badly injured in a railway accident in the Boulogne area in May 1919.

Looking through the TNA website,I did see there is at least one surviving war diary for a Field Bakery,but not for the 17th.

Another of my Holsworthy men lost in WWI (actually he was discharged and died of TB).

Albert Trace (S4/157909) was a Baker before the war I guess it is of little surprise that he was posted to (I Think) 74th Field Bakery (his attestation sheet isnt very clear, but I'm 99% certain it says the 74th) and went to France 25 Feb 1916 and remained in France with the unit until 15 June 1918 when he was sent home.

Browsing through my library and trawling through the net I have been unable to 1) locate the unit or 2) be able to find hardly any background information regarding the role of the Field Bakery.

Can anyone help? Any information would be of a great help....

I believe that a Field Bakery establishment was one officer and 92 men,to feed 26,000.My grandfather(295235) was also a baker,who was mobilised in 1917 ,at 18,and continued to work as a baker in the Army.His "Pension"records show he was sent from the Supply Depot at Bath to 157th Bakery Section at Tunbridge Wells,then,in January 1918 to 17th Field Bakery ,I think at Boulogne.He was quite badly injured in a railway accident in the Boulogne area in May 1919.

Looking through the TNA website,I did see there is at least one surviving war diary for a Field Bakery,but not for the 17th.

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Thanks for that - there seems to be little information available about these units

I believe that a Field Bakery establishment was one officer and 92 men,to feed 26,000.My grandfather(295235) was also a baker,who was mobilised in 1917 ,at 18,and continued to work as a baker in the Army.His "Pension"records show he was sent from the Supply Depot at Bath to 157th Bakery Section at Tunbridge Wells,then,in January 1918 to 17th Field Bakery ,I think at Boulogne.He was quite badly injured in a railway accident in the Boulogne area in May 1919.

Looking through the TNA website,I did see there is at least one surviving war diary for a Field Bakery,but not for the 17th.

I believe that a Field Bakery establishment was one officer and 92 men,to feed 26,000.My grandfather(295235) was also a baker,who was mobilised in 1917 ,at 18,and continued to work as a baker in the Army.His "Pension"records show he was sent from the Supply Depot at Bath to 157th Bakery Section at Tunbridge Wells,then,in January 1918 to 17th Field Bakery ,I think at Boulogne.He was quite badly injured in a railway accident in the Boulogne area in May 1919.

Looking through the TNA website,I did see there is at least one surviving war diary for a Field Bakery,but not for the 17th.

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Bread was a staple part of the British ration and the Field Bakeries worked unceasingly to ensure that the troops received their daily ration of relatively fresh bread.

Charles M

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