Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

CWG Cemeteries Ypres Salient


kerry
 Share

Recommended Posts

It's interesting to note that a lot of people think Godewaersvelde is in Belgian; one of the P&S books states that the nurse(?s) buried there 'died in Flanders'...

Paul,

I was always under the assumption that Godewaersvelde IS in Flanders. French Flanders,maybe,but Flanders nonetheless.

Historically speaking,flanders encompasses a chunk of N.E.France and has done since medieval times. Many places mentioned in the Flanders campaign of Marlborough (such as Cassel,Dunkirk etc.) are in France. Flemish placenames abound in this area of France.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Yes, that's quite true; but in the context of the BEF, when we talk of 'France and Flanders', Flanders usually means Belgium and the Salient - that's my point. While the CCS at 'God-wears-velvet' was receiving casualties from around Ypres, personnel who died there could not have been called 'Ypres casualties'.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Fair point,Paul.

But if a soldier was being treated for (or dying from!) wounds received at Ypres,surely he is an "Ypres casualty"?

I say this because I have the medals to a soldier buried there who was (very)badly wounded at 3rd Ypres and died there.I regard him as a casualty of this battle,even though he is buried in France.

Dave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sorry Dave, you've misunderstood me - by "personnel" I meant personnel of the CCS, not patients, whom you rightly indentify as being "Ypres casualties"; the same applies to places like Bailleul, where most of those buried there were hit in the Salient, but the RAMC personnel buried there died at Bailleul, not in the Salient.

Does this make sense!!??

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It does now.

Cheers,Paul.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Ronnie

In Pauls book on Walking the Salient.. he mentions Nellie Spindler and others within the context of Lijssenthoek cemetery (P 138-140). Was there lst year.. well worth the visit, and as others have said it does have a wide range of nationalities interred there

John

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Agree entirely Prowse Point, Mud Corner & the two in the woods - a perfect and usually uncrowded walk.

Prowse Point is the work of Cowlinshaw, probably the best of the younger architects working for Lutyens. In the 1930's he became the leading figure in the Arts and Crafts movement in the UK. One of his other cemeteries was threatened by the proposed new airport on the Somme

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...