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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

What can you make of this uniform?


Chris_Baker

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This is James Gibson, regiment unknown. Even I, no uniform expert, can see his helmet, service chevrons etc. There appears to be a crown on his left cuff and he has a medal ribbon. But what are they, and what else can be deduced from the picture?

Crown:

post-1-1223452815.jpg

Ribbon:

post-1-1223452835.jpg

Man:

post-1-1223453019.jpg

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Chris

Certainly no expert on uniforms, they'll be along later ;) but I would associate the crown on his left sleeve with the rank of a WOII (CSM?), the medal ribbon, I suspect, could be the 1914 Star.

Regards

Steve

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Chris

The pith helmet indicates Middle East and in winter, since he is not wearing Khaki Drill. The number of service stripes point to postwar, probably winter 1918-1919. The medal riband might possibly be the 1914 Star, especially since one of the service chevrons could be for 1914. It looks as though there is a three letter title on his shoulder, possibly AOC?

Charles M

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Is he wearing riding breeches, there appears to be the extra material on the inside leg of his trousers.

John

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He also appears to have his puttees wound for mounted duties.

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Existence of any second names is unknown. I was sent the pic by email, the sender telling me that a regimental museum had advised her it was an India General Service Medal and he is a cavalryman. Personally I disagree with both diagnoses but what do you think?

Does the belt and leather webbing tell us much?

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Hi Chris,

To me a Sam Browne Belt and brace arrangement would indicate WOI (RSM), however I would have expected to see the Royal Arms on his wrist rather than the Crown. Having said that, RSM is an appointment, theoretically available to ranks junior to WOI. With this in mind he could have been a substantive WOII acting up as RSM but not being in the acting rank.

Cheers,

Nigel

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IIRC apart from Officers, the only ones who would wear a Sam Browne would be an RSM or RQMS.

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Sadly the indication of wearing a Sam Browne wasn't the preserve of a WOI(RSM) during this period as WOII's were also allowed to wear them and superior quality SD jackets. I can't remember the exact date when this privilage was removed but it was well after WWI.

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He is not wearing spurs and so I don't think that he is a cavalryman. Likewise he appears to have some form of walking stick.

Charles M

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There is a photograph in Milner's 'Leeds Pals' of one of the original pals - an infantryman - wearing riding breeches, so this chap wearing them doesn't necessarily mean he was mounted, still less, cavalry.

Cheers,

Nigel

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Almost every infantryman in the [very large] transport section of his battalion would or could be dressed for mounted duty.

If we go down the 'RSM' line, this has to be before mid 1915, when the badge changed. The overseas service chevrons make this impossible. So he is a WO II of some sort. There were lots of sorts, but RQMS and equivalent wore a different badge, so scratch that. He is too senior to be infantry transport section, so scratch that. This means he is probably not infantry, he is a WO II, and photo is either late war or post war.

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