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A scene in the Dorchester Military Museum of the Devon & Dorset Regiments. The painting of the Devons during the gas attack of April 1915 in Flanders is by one of the foremost artists of the period, Fortunino Matania. The bayonet is a German “ Pioneer” version

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The Museum

Norman

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The Tank Museum Bovington, a detail from the recreation of a trench on the Somme in 1916.

BLIGHTERS

The House is crammed: tier beyond tier they grin

And cackle at the Show, while prancing ranks

Of harlots shrill the chorus, drunk with din;

‘We’re sure the Kaiser loves our dear old Tanks!’

I’d like to see a Tank come down the stalls,

Lurching to rag-time tunes, or ‘Home, sweet Home’,

And there’d be no more jokes in Music-halls

To mock the riddled corpses round Bapaume.

SIEGFRIED SASSOON

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Norman

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  • 4 weeks later...

TANK MUSEUM BOVINGTON UK

Part of the display of arifacts from the Battle of Flers - Coucelette in September 1916, the first use of tanks in war. The background is a trench map of the area of the attack

This is the Webley Revolver belonging to 25 year-old Acting Captain Arthur Blowers the commander tank of D5 Dolphin that got further than anyone else on the 15th September 1916 and who was awarded the Military Cross for his actions that day. His Son relates that his Father was awarded the MC for returning to his burning tank to rescue the driver. He said that he sat in the tank all day firing the revolver at German Infantry; firing over 100 rounds he recalled that none of the targets were more that 10 yards away so I didnt miss many.

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Norman

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  • 2 weeks later...

Nice one Nigel, here is my photo of the pillbox near the Dodengang on the river Yser.

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The battles of the Yser extended over the four years of the war. However perhaps the most critical of them all was in 1914 when the Germans almost broke the Belgian line. The story is that of a railway and a river. By the end of October 1914 following the struggles around Liege, Namur and Antwerp, the exhausted Belgian army had fallen back onto a ten miles long line of defence based on the Yser River between the North sea at Nieuport and the town of Dixmuide. On 21 October the Germans crossed the Yser at Tervate and a probable German advance to the Channel ports was only prevented by the flooding of vast tracts of land and the adoption of a defensive line based on the Dixmuide to Nieuport railway embankment which ran behind the river. After 15 days of continuous struggle, and a heroic Belgian bayonet charge, the front held. The lines would hold for four years

Norman

PS Some cracking photos Vico (Post 686) please add descriptions which will enhance the pleasure of viewing them considerably.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Vico many thanks for adding descriptions to your photos. The training trenches are very interesting and new to me plus the Staffs Museum likewise.

Best Regards

Norman

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French woodland cemetery, Col du Calvaire

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Ah, les braves gens

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cheers Martin B

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

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The hot, tiring hike was well worth it for the view from by the Devil's Eye OP on Grand Couronné, FYROM, taken in May 2011. The horizon is about 45 miles away. Clickable thumbnail to the full-sized image.

Keith

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Thanks for posting the link to your photo, I see that I am todays lucky winner and have won an iphone 45 (whatever that is)all I have to do is to CLICK ON THE BUTTON before time runs out, so here I go (not)

Norman :thumbsup:

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