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Photographs


Guest Stoner
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Super photos – one of my favourites is this of Larch Wood CWGC in Flanders of which Edmund Blunden wrote :-

Concert Party: Busseboom

“… Of barrage south by Saint Eloi,

And the red lights flaming there

Called madness: Come my bonny boy,

And dance to the latest air.

To this new concept, white we stood;

Cold certainty held our breath,

While men in the tunnels below Larch Wood

Were kicking men to death”.

Norman

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Passchendaele New British Cemetery

(view towards Tyne Cot)

Sanctuary Wood Cemetery

(Hill 62)

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Cpt. H Ackroyd

V.C. , M.C.

Royal Army Medical Corps

Birr Cross Roads Cemetery, Zillebeke

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Authuille military cemetery.

In my opinion the most beautiful one in the Somme region.

The grave second from right in the foreground is the one of William McBride.

Known from the song 'The green fields of France' by Eric Bogle.

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Cliff ... Are you allowed to walk up the crassiers or is that something you looked for forgiveness for rather than permission?

Andy

Andy,

No, you are not allowed to walk up. When we were there we had a guide who brings small groups by car up the crassiers.

This guide is Gilles he lives in Loos and he is also a member of the GWF.

So you can easily contact him by mail.

Best regards,

Sir Cliff

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Andy,

Gilles works as a guide for the small but interesting museum in Loos. Very nice man. He has the key to the gate of the 'crassiers'

Sir Cliff and I both enjoyed the view that we had and imagined what a view the Germans must have had on that paricukar day of the Battle of Loos.

Sll the best,

Fred

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Guest KevinEndon
what a view the Germans must have had on that paricukar day of the Battle of Loos.

Sll the best,

Fred

The crassiers were a heck of a lot smaller in 1915 but having said that even if you stand on the tower at Dud Corner Cemetery and Loos Memorial you get a great view over the area so another 100 feet above that would have been a commanding area to hold.

Some great photos being added to this brilliant thread. Every one of them holds a place in someones heart, everyone tells a tale

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Kavinaka,

Yes, somewhere on this forum I wrote that the crassiers in 1814 were about 100 feet high and that they were now over 300 feet.

The Loos Museum also has pictures of a tall structure, a sort of mining-machine, called 'London Bridge'' that must

have reminded the British soldiers of London Bridge. There must have been more of these 'Bridges' then.

All the best,

Fred

Sorry,

I meant to say that I wrote somewhere on the GWF that the crassiers in 1915 were about 100/30 metres high as Gilles told us.

Cheers,

Fred

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