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rynegold

WWI uniform/unit ID for my friend's dad.

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rynegold

All I have are these two pix of this little fellow; his boots are so big, they eyelets are drawn together.

The family knows he was a US citizen, from Ohio, and born in 1897 (they say/think) which would have made him 19 in 1916. He doesn't look that old in these two photos but that can be deceiving, or just plain wrong.

They, the family, could be wrong about his birth year, the era, or even the war they "think" he was in; they say he was in WWI, perhaps these photos were "after" the war.

His son, who is looking to find out about his grandfather (this boy in the photos) is only about 67 or so years of age and that would make his father a very "late bloomer" in his day: a dad at 44!, provided he was really born in 97.

Does anyone recognize the uniform?, particularly the cap? I believe this sort of ear flap cold weather style made it all the way into WWII; at least the Wiermacht had one of this sort.

And... what of the Mauser ('looking') frog and bayonet?, at least that's what configuration it looks to be in/for.

So who did this Ohio boy serve with? This looks to be an European uniform. And he was clearly an American.

Both this dress uniform and his working uniform have that same (or so it seems) characteristic "pointy pocket flap" look to them and indeed; it may be the same uniform with a "Dress collar" added on in photo #1 although it looks lighter in color. And I believe he's wearing the same pair of boots in both photos.

His name was John Ganon (or Gannon) and he brought home a Czechoslovakian wife when he returned from Europe. His son says he spoke several languages.

Several posts on this site make this to be either Austo-Hungarian or... a Czech remake post war.

Opinions please and... I've been promised an additional photo of this fellow with "another" soldier posed... who knows how. Perhaps another clue to ponder.

ww1soldier1.jpg

ww1soldier2.jpg

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Neil Clark

Unusual uniform, I'd say possibly Serbian or Greek? I'm sure someone with a better grounding in this area will be able to confirm it's exact origin...

Looks like 61st Regiment?

Is that a CLERIC's Collar in the second photo? :huh:

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sw63

Are my eyes decieving me?

The first photo looks like a fake. His head doesn't sit right on his shoulders and there is a ragged line running east / west across the photo just below his chin.

His head seems to have a different contrast to the rest of the photo.

Would anyone agree?

Simon

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Neil Clark

Simon,

I know what you mean but no I think it's genuine. Def the same young man in both pics.

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sw63
Simon,

I know what you mean but no I think it's genuine. Def the same young man in both pics.

Same head yes- I'm just not certain it's his body in pic 1

Simon

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rynegold
Same head yes- I'm just not certain it's his body in pic 1

Simon

:lol: Simon!, so you think he got someone else to wear his shoes? (you did notice didn't you?, same pair!)

Come now, its the same fellow. I'm to have the actual cabinet photo in hand sometime next week and will make a better pic and hopefully the studio name and address are on there somewhere. Also, I'm to see another pic of this little soldier and a comrade posed in camp.

Here's a puzzlement; you see in pic2 the little bit of fabric hanging out from under his tunic on the right hand side? That is his information capsule: name-birth date-address. So, my question is, was that a standard practice/personal equipment item, solely of the Austro-Hungarian army?, or did other nations/armies use this as well? We, (the AEF) and Britain used dog tags. What of Germany, France and others?

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wyliecoyote

Germany used identity discs ( same as Dog tags).

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sw63
:lol: Simon!, so you think he got someone else to wear his shoes? (you did notice didn't you?, same pair!)

Come now, its the same fellow. I'm to have the actual cabinet photo in hand sometime next week and will make a better pic and hopefully the studio name and address are on there somewhere. Also, I'm to see another pic of this little soldier and a comrade posed in camp.

Here's a puzzlement; you see in pic2 the little bit of fabric hanging out from under his tunic on the right hand side? That is his information capsule: name-birth date-address. So, my question is, was that a standard practice/personal equipment item, solely of the Austro-Hungarian army?, or did other nations/armies use this as well? We, (the AEF) and Britain used dog tags. What of Germany, France and others?

Actually, I did look at the boots - photo 2 appears to have 3 eyelets and the rest quick-release hooks, whereas photo 1 are all eyelets.

Simon

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4thGordons
Actually, I did look at the boots - photo 2 appears to have 3 eyelets and the rest quick-release hooks, whereas photo 1 are all eyelets.

Simon

I'm with Simon on this, that was my impression also. How common were the quick release eyelet/ hookss on enlisted men's boots in this period?

My first reaction to the initial post was that these were Austro Hung. uniforms - I have a selection which look similar - although they usually have stars on the collars not bars. The first one should be identifiable with a decent scan there is also clearly somehting odd going on with the head/neck but it may simply be a fold or crease in the picture

Was he a natural born American (is that what you mean by "clearly American") if so when did he leave to fight? (if its Austro Hung. he would have been on the "other" side of course - which may have caused him some difficulties upon return) and return? His departure and return might be traceable through immigration/emigration ships records?

Have you (or your friend ) tried tracking him via the federal census for 1910, 1920 and 1930? (which would also give dates of birth)

Chris

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