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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Lincolnshire Regiment October 1915


frogturn

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Hi to all.

to set the scene;

Nearly 40 years ago as young lads ,me and a friend, found ,when metal detecting in a local[wiltshire] almshouse garden[with permission] a medal.

Over the years its trundled around with me as i moved from place to place in my box of treasures.

Today i decided to have a look on Ancestry and see if i could find its owner and his story.

I assumed it had belonged to a gentleman who had spent his later years in this wiltshire almshouse and then been lost at some stage.

What i found was a different story.

The 1914/15 star i had belonged to

Private John Leonard Anderson ,2516,1st/5th battalion,Lincolnshire Regiment.

His cwgc certificate then told me he had died on 13th october 1915.

Then sadly it states his brothers Charles William and Robert also fell.

A huge loss for one family.

The mystery of how this medal ended up in a garden in a quiet Wiltshire town may never be known,but can anyone tell me the events of 13th october 1915 ,with the Lincolnshire Regiment, that led to this tragedy.

He is buried at the Loo's memorial.

Many thanks to all ,for any help forthcoming.

Paul.

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13th October 1915 was the date the 46th (North Midland) Division launched an ill-fated attack on the Hohenzollern Redoubt at the northern end of what had already become the Loos battlefield. The 1/5th Lincolns were part of that division. You can learn a lot more from their regimental history (which has been republished by Naval & Military Press) and there's plenty on the web about this.

Lots of people will now give you more details. There are a fair few Yellowbellies who contribute to this forum.

Bryn

Hi to all.

to set the scene;

Nearly 40 years ago as young lads ,me and a friend, found ,when metal detecting in a local[wiltshire] almshouse garden[with permission] a medal.

Over the years its trundled around with me as i moved from place to place in my box of treasures.

Today i decided to have a look on Ancestry and see if i could find its owner and his story.

I assumed it had belonged to a gentleman who had spent his later years in this wiltshire almshouse and then been lost at some stage.

What i found was a different story.

The 1914/15 star i had belonged to

Private John Leonard Anderson ,2516,1st/5th battalion,Lincolnshire Regiment.

His cwgc certificate then told me he had died on 13th october 1915.

Then sadly it states his brothers Charles William and Robert also fell.

A huge loss for one family.

The mystery of how this medal ended up in a garden in a quiet Wiltshire town may never be known,but can anyone tell me the events of 13th october 1915 ,with the Lincolnshire Regiment, that led to this tragedy.

He is buried at the Loo's memorial.

Many thanks to all ,for any help forthcoming.

Paul.

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Hello Paul (and all)

John Leonard was one of three brothers all killed in action while serving with the 1/5th Btn Lincolnshire Regiment. They were from Gainsborough.

Robert, born at Owston Ferry, was the eldest and 31 when he died. He left a widow and four children and lived at Horse and Jockey Yard in Gainsborough. Prior to the war he worked at Watson's Shipyard. He was the first of the brothers to enlist at the end of August 1914. After training he embarked for 'France' on March 1st 1915, he was in B Company. He was killed on April 9th 1915, when his platoon (No 6) was holding an outpost trench called E1 Left near to Spanbroekmolen in Belgium. The trench was known to the men as 'Hell's Kitchen' as it was only 30 yards from the enemy frontline. A bullet passed through the sandbags, killing him and wounding another man. He now lies in Packhorse Farm Shrine cemetery.

John Leonard (23) enlisted in September 1914 and Charles William (21) in November. They were born in Gainsborough and lived at 79 Campbell Street in the town, both were unmarried. John Leonard, also known as Oliver worked at Marshall's Engineering firm before the war, Charles, like his eldest brother was employed at Watson's. Both went out in one of the first drafts arriving on 25th June 1915. After a tough three months trench initiation, firstly at Sanctuary Wood and then Hill 60, the brothers moved with the rest of the 46th Division ready to take part in the final phase of the battle of Loos.

The 1/5th Lincolns and the 1/4th Leicestershires of the 138th Brigade were part of the first wave to attempt the assault upon the Hohenzollern Redoubt at 2 p.m. on Saturday October 13th 1915. The attack had been preceeded by a large artillery bombardment and the use of poison gas for an hour before, both had little effect. The leading waves and those following did manage to overun the redoubt, but floundered as they attempted to reach their final objectives. The 1/5th Lincolns suffered 483 casualties of which 188, including John and Charles Anderson were killed.

John Leonard was recorded as 'Missing' in the Grimsby News in November 1915. Neither brother has a known grave and like 97% of those killed at the Hohenzollern are recorded on the Loos Memorial to the Missing.

Regards,

Steve.

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All,

I've just been re-reading my last post and it occurs to me there is a lot of reading between the lines to be done here. But I suppose a tragic but not uncommon story.

Steve.

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Thank you all very much ,particularly Steve,for such a comprehensive reply.Its not often that we can put so much detail to these objects that we hold in trust for the future.I never thought when we found the medal ,all those years ago,that it would tell such a story.

I shall look after it, with even more care than before.

Early next year i hope to visit the Loo's Memorial and i shall pay my respects to these brothers for their sacrifice.

Thanks,Paul.

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Thanks indeed for remembering Paul.

There is now (erected 2006) a memorial on the site of the redoubt, between Vermelles and Hulloch which may also be worth a visit,

Best Regards,

Steve

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It never ceases to amaze me the number of men listed as missing, but 97% of those killed (188) is a huge percentage of missing men in one action. Where did all those corpse's disappear too.

Alan

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It never ceases to amaze me the number of men listed as missing, but 97% of those killed (188) is a huge percentage of missing men in one action. Where did all those corpse's disappear too.

Alan

I believe the number of missing is due to the progress of the action where the battle surged to and fro for days with eventually the British being almost completely evicted from the redoubt. There was another attempt at taking the redoubt on 9th - 13th October with little or no success. This implies artillery bombardment from both sides for an extended period. After Loos, the area was one of intensive mining activity. This again would bury and rebury remains. Many memoirs comment on the rows of kilted soldiers lying in rows in No Mans Land two years after the battle.

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The total casualties on 13/10/1915 for the 46th Division was 3763, of these 74 officers and 1234 o.r's were killed or died of wounds only 91 men have identified graves, the percentage of men with no known grave is 93%.

Steve.

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  • 2 months later...

My grandfather Ernest Askey, was batman to Capt. Herbert Scorer, "C" Coy, 5th Lincs KIA 13th Oct 1915 at the Hohenzollern Redoubt. It is my understanding from a relative since dead who made enquiries at East Kirkby, Lincolnshire that Capt. Scorer was shot deliberately by one of his own men, a not uncommon action at that time. I do not know the name of the man, but he became a hermit/recluse living in a shack/shed outside of East Kirkby after the war. It was when Capt Scorer was shot, that my grandfather went to his aid and was promptly badly wounded in head & lower leg by a nearby explosion.

Not much of a story, but a personal tragedy and one of many sad incidents at that time. I just felt it should be recorded for posterity here.

Thank you,

Ian

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