Jump to content
The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

Royal Artillery


Greyhound
 Share

Recommended Posts

Part of a collection of family photos lent to the local history soc for scanning, but the donor isn't sure of the identity of this man. I think I know who it is, but just seeking some confirmation from you experts, also any subtle evidence that might help date it.

We know he's a Goodwin, and the local paper lists Tom Goodwin as serving with the RFA in the earliest published service rolls. I think I have the right MIC, can't be 100% sure, but he was Tom Edward (not Thomas). Tom stayed in the Army after WWI, so his service record won't be available to check.

So to sum up - any reason why the man in the photo and the MIC may not be the same? And any idea of date, please?

post-16674-1220537239.jpg

post-16674-1220537308.jpg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

It's almost certain to be pre 1922,Kay,going by his jacket.

Dave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Nicely turned out chap, with carefully 'set-up collar', using hooks and eyes, or sewn to make it look neat. Standard 1902 SD uniform, with soft 1917 pattern cap. Bandolier equipment sported are consistent with (but not exclusive to) RFA, which looks OK on shoulder titles. Not up on RFA ranks, but guns above the sergeant stripes will be commented upon by others. In summary, looks possible that this is your man, and dates from around 1917-18, I would suggest.

Cheers

Peter

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Grace

The gun badge above the stripes is to signify that he was a full sergeant.

Can I detect a wound stripe on the lower left sleeve? If so, the photo is dated from at least 1916.

Regards

Mel

Link to comment
Share on other sites

"Clasp & Rose" (to the 1914 Star) and date of entry of 11.9.14 confirms that he went to France with 6th Division, in which 12th Bde RFA (equipped with 4.5-inch howitzers) served.

Ron

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Thanks everyone for your contributions.

When they showed me the photo, I already knew a bit of Tom's background as sadly his son is part of my research, being on the WWII section of our war memorial. :( Think I can safely conclude that this is Tom.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

In WW1 a 6 gun bty bty had 7 sergeants, one per gun and the battery signals sgt (this post had been introduced a few years before 1914).

I think the sigs sgt had crossed flags on his sleeve cuff. Hence 'flaggy'. However, there may also have been some tradesmen sgts in the bty, I think these too had badges on their sleeve cuff. I suspect the senior ranks of these may have been on a brigade basis, eg perhaps the bde establishment entitled them to 2 farrier sgts, but there were 3 or 4 btys so there was an element of dead man's shoes which could mean a new incumbent was in a different bty. No doubt someone can confirm or deny all this, I'm mostly extrapolating back from WW2.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
 Share

×
×
  • Create New...