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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

SRD Jars - Who made them?


Gunner Bailey
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2 hours ago, trajan said:

 Many thanks from a non-SRD collector 

 

Julian

Non-SRD collectors might have one example; I’m pretty sure four jars is well on the way to a collection. 

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2 hours ago, GWF1967 said:

Non-SRD collectors might have one example; I’m pretty sure four jars is well on the way to a collection. 

 

Seconded  :thumbsup:

 

BillyH.

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  • 3 months later...

Hi, I have a port dundas srd jar in perfect condition, with the letters impressed rather than painted on.  My mum has had it for many years but we have not taken any notice of the srd wording until now.  Are you able to give me any information on this as new to this forum or can you suggest best place for help please

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58 minutes ago, Libby maddox said:

Hi, I have a port dundas srd jar in perfect condition, with the letters impressed rather than painted on.  My mum has had it for many years but we have not taken any notice of the srd wording until now.  Are you able to give me any information on this as new to this forum or can you suggest best place for help please

 

It's probably best to go to the start of the thread and work through. There's a lot of background in the early pages.

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  • 1 month later...

My compliments to everyone who has contributed to this thread. Up until this morning, we had never given a second thought to the provenance of my late mother's  "cider jar". Luckily a complete stranger corrected years of ignorance this morning and we now know it is a SRD jar made by Candy (Chamster has one as well, I see), who, until not so very long ago, were still making tiles down here in Devon. I have just read this thread from start to end and it is a real education. Thank you for all the information you have put together!

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40 minutes ago, Madz said:

My compliments to everyone who has contributed to this thread. Up until this morning, we had never given a second thought to the provenance of my late mother's  "cider jar". Luckily a complete stranger corrected years of ignorance this morning and we now know it is a SRD jar made by Candy (Chamster has one as well, I see), who, until not so very long ago, were still making tiles down here in Devon. I have just read this thread from start to end and it is a real education. Thank you for all the information you have put together!

 

Welcome to GWForum! Glad to have helped you out! We now look forward to a photograph of the 'cider jar'!  

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Ha! Well I am not going to get back the time I spent googling for a Devon Cider Maker with the initials S.R.D. but I am sure no one here is going to broadcast that now, are they?

 

Here is the jar (with unfortunate chip). I am sure I read somewhere about being able to date these jars by their "glazed bottoms", did you reach a conclusion? The information I can find on Candy says they first started supporting the war effort by making "porous stoneware pots needed for the wet batteries of British submarines in the First World War" - they then moved into other "domestic ware" but used the name "Westcontree Ware" (I know. You may now wince. I did.) for these products after 1916.. so I am wondering if I can actually date this jar as in the first half of the Great War, except for the glazing...?

cider jar.jpg

cider jar 1.jpg

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Now, the key question - the real stuff (scrumpy) or not?:rolleyes:

 

I'll leave others to comment on dating, etc.;)

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Ah, the proper, proper stuff that they dont give to people they dont know as they dont want to be up on a GBH charge? There are various members of my family that made/make that stuff but, frankly, i prefer my intestines not dissolved. Call me a woss but if light wont shine through my scrumpy, i am not drinking it.

 

I will be very interested to know more about the dates and also how this one compares to any other Candy jars. Last month i finally got my great uncle recognised for all perpetuity by CWGC after a mix up with someone with the same name; he served 1914 to 1916 in the Devons, so if the dates are similar, it carries more resonance for me.

 

 

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SRD Jars were made in glass as well as pottery.  So any Submarine Battery Acid may have been stored in those jars. Submarine service jars were also encased in a wicker basket for protection, as the all metal interior of a sub would be rather unforgiving should anything fall over.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hi I wonder if anyone is able to give me some information on these SRD jars that are my fathers. He was a serving warrant officer in BAOR and when the Berlin Wall came down all the reserve rations for the military were disposed of. My father was gifted these two unopened bottles of rum by his Quartermaster and they have been stored ever since.

 

 

IMG_2833.jpeg.0b5f8d8a94eb1418cf442adf8d8d4f41.jpegIMG_2830.jpeg.f55497555ee84473756b22606391f516.jpegIMG_2826.jpeg.a264c1b8a99f61b1a8d7779ffbc5477f.jpeg

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What fun items to have! But can't help with markings...

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The Jars were made by Pearsons of Chesterfield. WW2 Jars were dated but the vast majority of WW1 jars were not. Pearsons jars are probably the most common make.

 

Congratulations on having full jars! Brilliant.

 

A few years ago some were found in an army base in Germany and when auctioned off made over £400 a jar. So you have a historic and desirable pair of SRD jars.

 

The Wicker covered jars were mainly meant for Navy / Submarine use. 

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I have a feeling - happy to be corrected - impressed stamps are more likley to be WW1 than stencilled stamps, more likely to be WW2...

 

Julian

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17 hours ago, trajan said:

I have a feeling - happy to be corrected - impressed stamps are more likley to be WW1 than stencilled stamps, more likely to be WW2...

 

Julian

 

Most WW2 jars seem to be made by Pearson so dated ink stamped marks prevails in that era. In WW1 there is a mix of stamped and impressed marks mainly based upon what the potters did for their peacetime work. In some cases like Price, the potters stamp also includes the inspectors ID (number). There does not seem to be any hard or fast rule about potters marks. The best source is a book called 'Encyclopaedia of British Pottery and Porcelain Marks' by Geoffrey Godden F.R.S.A. There are actually five types of pottery marks. Incised, Impressed, Printed, Painted,  plus Applied Moulded (last very rare). 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 10/01/2021 at 17:16, trajan said:

 

Just received permission from SWMBO on that one, if still available. I have three only, and no space (or money!) to form a collection but four is a nice round number!

Receiving permission was one thing, getting the dealer to bring it down to a reasonable price was another, but FINALLY the MOTTISHAW & BRADSHAW . MAKERS . CASTLEFORD is in my hands! I think the Treaty of Versailles was concluded in less time... Many thanks to all you guys out there for advice!

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On 02/07/2021 at 16:32, trajan said:

Receiving permission was one thing, getting the dealer to bring it down to a reasonable price was another, but FINALLY the MOTTISHAW & BRADSHAW . MAKERS . CASTLEFORD is in my hands! I think the Treaty of Versailles was concluded in less time... Many thanks to all you guys out there for advice!

Well done Julian - Rare one!

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  • 1 month later...

Hello, I’m a new member with a first post here.  Today I received most likely my first SRD jar.  Can anyone identify the makers stamp? Any help would be greatly appreciated.FB89E6DA-6C55-4355-920A-F78040F4132E.jpeg.e26156f3b41fcff82cbf974a02e1050d.jpeg

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I was asked in a message to add pics of the jar and total SRD font size for identification. Looks like the font is 7/8’ X 2’

127532F4-99D0-484F-AE36-B0FDF580B35E.jpeg

4A514DA7-7154-4808-AFEC-FECEFE3441E9.jpeg

2224397C-12FA-4E00-B72B-C81106FC9FF3.jpeg

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On 21/08/2021 at 15:25, Noj Gnal said:

I was asked in a message to add pics of the jar and total SRD font size for identification. Looks like the font is 7/8’ X 2’

127532F4-99D0-484F-AE36-B0FDF580B35E.jpeg

4A514DA7-7154-4808-AFEC-FECEFE3441E9.jpeg

2224397C-12FA-4E00-B72B-C81106FC9FF3.jpeg

Hi Noj Gnal,

I am certain that this jar is made by............CANDY  ENGLAND.........with in the centre DEVON  MADE IN . I was fortunate to purchase mine in NEWTON ABBOT just a couple of

miles from where it was made. Also coincidentally many years ago an Aunt of mine was employed.  The font SRD fits as does the circular base stamp. Trust this is helpful.

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Excellent update. I've never seen a Candy made SRD jar.

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