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Remembered Today:

SRD Jars - Who made them?


Gunner Bailey
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John (Gunner Bailey) have you managed to resolve the date question re Price Bristol / Price & Powell impressed potters mark's ?

Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

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  • 3 weeks later...
John (Gunner Bailey) have you managed to resolve the date question re Price Bristol / Price & Powell impressed potters mark's ?

Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

Paul

I've certainly never seen an SRD with Price & Powell on it so it's not been an issue.

John

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John sorry my post was a little confusing. I should have quoted your previous post #182,

" Pearsons' are by far the most numerous, but Price of Bristol are seemingly becoming more plentiful too. The number in the Price mark will not be a date. I suspect it is an inspectors number."

The numbers contained within the Price mark relate simply to a individual potter, the person concerned was given a unique number at the start of his employment it was never repeated when he left. It was simply down to piece rate. Anyway, Price absorbed Powell's pottery in 1906 just for a very short period the stoneware impressed makers mark read Price, Powell & Co Bristol before reverting back to just Price after 1910. You will never see any SRD Jar marked Price, Powell or simply marked Powell Bristol.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

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John sorry my post was a little confusing. I should have quoted your previous post #182,

" Pearsons' are by far the most numerous, but Price of Bristol are seemingly becoming more plentiful too. The number in the Price mark will not be a date. I suspect it is an inspectors number."

The numbers contained within the Price mark relate simply to a individual potter, the person concerned was given a unique number at the start of his employment it was never repeated when he left. It was simply down to piece rate. Anyway, Price absorbed Powell's pottery in 1906 just for a very short period the stoneware impressed makers mark read Price, Powell & Co Bristol before reverting back to just Price after 1910. You will never see any SRD Jar marked Price, Powell or simply marked Powell Bristol.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

Thanks Paul. You are correct that I've never seen a Price Powell jar. I agree that the numbers in the Price Marks are inspectors or potters marks. I've also got a SRD with a number in it from Kennedy Pottery and I think one from Skey.

John

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Hi, my humble addition to the list is 1 1 gallon from Skey Tamworth & 1 1gallon from Grosvenor Glasgow.

I do have a question though;

Chris Henschke posted an ink marking of a ww2 SRD jar, with a date stamp en maker Pearson & Co Whittington moor (post #51).

I recently got a rum jar as a gift, but not marked with SRD. At the bottom of this jar is also an ink marking of Pearson & Co. Whittington moor,

but the date is partially readable "1.44", it seems to me that it resembles more 1844 then 1944. Now the question is, is that possible that it could be 1844 or were ink markings not used already then? Internet states Pearson & Co. Whittington moor started in 1810, so 1844 would be a possibility... I just don't know what to think!

Anybody have an idea as to which date it could be?

kind regards,

Wouter

post-10532-1275814498.jpg

post-10532-1275814513.jpg

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Hi Wouter,

Your stoneware jar will date from 1944. The style and extra refined "Bristol two tone glaze" support this, jars made during the first 80 years of the 19th century tend to be "baluster" shape (inverted pear shape) under glaze print onto basic stoneware, was introduced by the Port Dundas Pottery (Glasgow) in 1878.

Hope this helps.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

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Hi Wouter,

Your stoneware jar will date from 1944. The style and extra refined "Bristol two tone glaze" support this, jars made during the first 80 years of the 19th century tend to be "baluster" shape (inverted pear shape) under glaze print onto basic stoneware, was introduced by the Port Dundas Pottery (Glasgow) in 1878.

Hope this helps.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

Hi Paul, Ok, thank you for your experienced reply, now I finally know for sure..

Must have been a civilian jar that for some reason made it to Flanders, or perhaps due to the absence of time,

it wasn't printed with SRD-marking and shipped to the troops,or isn't that possible?

(Would rather 've had one from 1844, but that was thinking to optimistically of course!)

Kind regards,

Wouter

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Hi Paul, Ok, thank you for your experienced reply, now I finally know for sure..

Must have been a civilian jar that for some reason made it to Flanders, or perhaps due to the absence of time,

it wasn't printed with SRD-marking and shipped to the troops,or isn't that possible?

(Would rather 've had one from 1844, but that was thinking to optimistically of course!)

Kind regards,

Wouter

Hi Wouter

Thanks for joining the thread. SRD jars only started to be produced around 1900 so 1844 is impossible. I agree that your jar is most likely to be January 44. The reason being that no WW1 jars were ever dated and that it is possible that your jar may have been originally wicker covered and the maker may not have thought SRD needed to be added. That I think is the most likely scenario.

John

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Absolutely.

John do you feel it would be informative for members to see the style of Jars manufactured pre/post 1914 - 18 with conclusive researched dates of the potteries concerned along with a short mention of any "fillers" details where known?

Obviously not to confuse things a new thread would be called for etc, if your prepared to action this I will be more than willing to contribute images and info.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

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Hi Paul

The only known pre WW1 rum jar I've heard about is one in the IWM which actually has Supply Reserve Depot marked in full. WW2 jars are well covered in this thread (even if I don't have one). John

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Hi John,

Yes fair point.

Although clearly not S.R.D, far too old and privately commissioned I thought you might appreciate seeing this example (sorry for going off topic) it appeared at some Somerset antique event recently. Sadly I didn't know about it until after the event !

Leut Col. George Templar Graham was commanding officer of The Second Administrative Battalion from 1860 to 1867.

The '2nd Battalion Somerset Volunteer Rifles ' as a unit existed in the period between 1860 - when the various local volunteer companies set up in the wake of the 1859 invasion scare were grouped into administrative battalions (3 in Somerset) and the year 1881 - when the Rifle Volunteer Corps were renamed as Volunteer Battalions. In 1908 they were again reorganised being at last linked to the county regiments of the regular army and become the Territorial Force Battalions which served in the First World War.

2nd Battalion Somerset Volunteer Rifles were based at Taunton with several local companies at different locations - one was at Bridgewater.

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

2ndsom.jpg

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I don't know about John but that would certainly have been going home with me!

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I don't know about John but that would certainly have been going home with me!

Totally agree. That would not be left where it was.

John

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Absolutely.

John do you feel it would be informative for members to see the style of Jars manufactured pre/post 1914 - 18 with conclusive researched dates of the potteries concerned along with a short mention of any "fillers" details where known?

Regards Paul.

(Admin British Antique Bottle forum)

Paul

Earlier in the thread Norman (Sotonmate) gave an excellent description of the filling and the details of the contents in a post war environment. AN excellent read.

John

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  • 5 weeks later...

I am a new member of the forum. I have 4 SRD jars, all 1 gallon. 3 are Kennedy Glasgow, 1 is Brayne London. All are printed SRD. The Kennedy jars are superior quality to the Brayne. My jars come from the cellar of a small old chateau I am restoring in northern France. We are situated in an area that was used as a training ground, and was on the supply route. 1 soldier is buried in the village cemetary, an Irish Guard killed in a training accident. I would like to discover more about the history of this chateau , the village and the area during the years of the conflict. Surprisingly little information is available in France.

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I am a new member of the forum. I have 4 SRD jars, all 1 gallon. 3 are Kennedy Glasgow, 1 is Brayne London. All are printed SRD. The Kennedy jars are superior quality to the Brayne. My jars come from the cellar of a small old chateau I am restoring in northern France. We are situated in an area that was used as a training ground, and was on the supply route. 1 soldier is buried in the village cemetary, an Irish Guard killed in a training accident. I would like to discover more about the history of this chateau , the village and the area during the years of the conflict. Surprisingly little information is available in France.

Welcome to the forum. Yes Kennedy jars are Generally of good quality. They made jars pre war for the whisky trade. I've only got one Brayne jar and the quality of that is OK.

John

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  • 2 months later...

Hi Guys, I'm new here, been lurking for a while, but now I've joined up, as it was frustrating not being able to see any of the pictures.

I've got a few jars of my own, although I can't add anything to the SRD jar makers list, but I've found some images that some of you might find interesting as I've not seen any dark SRD jars before!

srdjars.jpg

smallsrdjars.jpg

sizesSrd.jpg

Paul

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Hi Paul

That is interesting. I've not seen all dark jars before, though I have seen all light jars mainly 1/2 gallon ones. Where was the top photo taken?

John

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No idea John: I came across them on a French website, which I've not been able to find again; if I remember correctly, it was an archived military history forum page.

I'll try searching again, and let you know if I find it.

Paul

Okay, I've found a page, I don't think it's the original one I found as that only had 1 page, this one has 3, but the same pictures are there. Point of interest, there is a glass carboy on page 2 marked SRD.

http://lagrandeguerr...s-srd-t7080.htm

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Thanks for the link Paul. The photo must be in a museum somewhere. The glass SRD's are rare but I've seen photos of them before. I think they were mainly for carrying battery acid, for MT and signals units. I'd like one for my collection one day.

John

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Hi John

Here is one of my recent purchases, and possibly the oldest? It has no makers stamp and no damage beyond a couple of small glazing chips to the rim of the neck, all the marks visable in the photos are in the glazing. This jar appears to have been initially dipped in a brown glaze like the brown jars in the picture above, and then dipped in the usual putty coloured body glaze and finally the toffee colour to the top. So, possibly a change of specification from the the brown to the ubiquitous colours we're all familiar with?

SRDJar001a.jpgSRDJar002a.jpg

SRDJar003a.jpg

Couple more below.

Paul

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Good Morning Gentlemen......

I have just purchased a 2 gallon jug at a flea market and it is marked Doulton-Lambeth......

Mike

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Paul

Thanks for posting the photos. Looking first at the impressed lettering, it looks very similar to a jar that I have from the Fulham Pottery - London. Secondly, my jar also seems to have had two different colours of brown. The pottery mark should be on the side down by the base. Interesting comparison.

John

Good Morning Gentlemen......

I have just purchased a 2 gallon jug at a flea market and it is marked Doulton-Lambeth......

Mike

Lucky man. Is it WW2 stamped?

John

post-8629-095296500 1288024201.jpg

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Hi John

Yes, the SRD stamp on your Fulham jar is similar but so are the ink stamps on various makes, and the glazing is different, so I don't think my unmarked jar is a Fulham.

Paul

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