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john w.

1/5th Northumberland fusiliers

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john w.

This relates to the time when Herbert Burden was with the fusiliers and hopefully may help trace events leading up to his arrest on 28th June 1915

any help greatfully recieved

John

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Alan Seymour

The following is taken from the War Diary of the 5th Bn. Northumberland Fusiliers, 50th Division, from page 3 - 4, 22 June - 28 June 1915.

22nd June. NEUVE EGLISE

In the morning the C.O., 2nd in Command, Adjutant and the Company Commanders went up to see the trenches that we were to take over - we were told that we should find the trenches very comfortable and quite after being at YPRES - it seemed pretty quite while we were there and we could go up and down the trenches anywhere by day - as soon as it was dark that night - we took over the trenches - relieving the 5th SOUTH STAFFORDSHIRE REGT: - the relief was carried out without loss though it took a considerable time.

23rd June.

Nothing in particular of interest occurred and it was a quite day - we found that the trench known as the Diagonal was a good deep and narrow trench - but that the rest consisted of sandbag breastworks which were very worn in parts and consequently not always bullet proof, and looked as if they would stand very little shelling - we had no casualties that day.

24th June.

A quite day - with a little shelling on both sides - we lost a brave and valuable officer early in the morning in Capt. W. G. Graham who was sniped through the head while looking over the parapet.

Casulaties 1 officer killed 2 O.R. wounded.

Captain Graham was buried in the evening by the Brigade Chaplain - just outside Battalion Hd. Qrs.

25th June.

A quite day with the usual shelling - at this time we shared our head-quarters which consisted of a farm house, known at ST. QUETINS'S CABARET on the outskirsts of the village of WULVERGHEM, with the 6th N.F.

26th June.

A quite day - with no casualties - Col. Coles: who had been staying back at the transport whilst Col. Spain (6th N.F.) was in command of the section, rejoined - and the 6th transferred their head-quarters to the house opposite which up till then had been used as a dressing station for both battalions - 17 men rejoined from hospital.

27th June.

A quite day - the usual German shelling - no casualties.

28th June.

A quite day - though 1 man of A Coy was shot through the head and killed whilst looking over the parapet - and Sergt. Kay of B. coy was rather badly wounded whilst on a reconnoitring patrol with Lieut Ellis - the previous night.

Alan Seymour

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john w.

Alan

Thanks for that it is really useful

John

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