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Remembered Today:

Royal Scots Fusiliers


darkisland

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No matter which way I turn and how many stories I read or listen to I can find very little about the RSF. Is it because there are very few interested in them or is there something I am missing?

Taking a quick look through the CWGC site they certainly paid as high a price as any other Regiment.

Any more supporters out there?

Darkisland.

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Darkisland

Yep............I'm definitely a supporter...........my Great Uncle served with the Royal Scots Fusiliers until he died of wounds in 1916.

For further information on them I would suggest contacting the Royal Highland Fusiliers Museum (The Royal Scots Fusiliers & the Highland Light Infantry were amalgamated into the Royal Highland Fusiliers in 1959)

The museums contact details are as follows.

518 Sauchiehall Street

Glasgow

G2 3LW

Tel: 0141 332 5639

E-mail: reg.sec@rhf.org.uk

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Darkisland,

One of my prize groups is the 1914 Star & clasp trio to 7187 Pte. John Sidwell, 1st Bn., Royal Scots Fusiliers. His medal index card indicates that he arrived in France on 27 August, probably with the first draft of reinforcements for the battalion, and he lasted less than three weeks, being killed in action on the Aisne on 15 September.

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The RSF are not forgotten by their successors. The museum has a lot of info on them.

I have researched one of the Crieff Memorial RSF men who died as acting CO of his unit.

PERCY WILLIAM THOMAS MacGREGOR-WHITTON

Captain

"C" Coy. 2nd Bn., Royal Scots Fusiliers

who died on

Sunday 9 July 1916 . Age 21 .

Additional Information: Son of Col. James MacGregor-Whitton (late Royal Scots Fusiliers), of Ardchoille, St. Fillans, Perthshire.

Cemetery: THIEPVAL MEMORIALSomme, France

Grave or Reference Panel Number: Pier and Face 3 C

Aye

Malcolm

post-2-1077462853.jpg

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I'm especially interested in the 4th and 5th Bn and their defence of Duedar on 23rd April 1916. The 4th Bn had extensive links with the Ardeer explosives factory. I have a bit of data on this if anyone's interested.

Simon

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Hi,

I am most definately a Royal Scots Fusilier supporter! I understand when you say that not much is mentioned of them. My Great Uncle served with the HLI, and have often thought the same about his regiment. I visited the museum in Sauchiehall Street last year, and learnt plenty more on the RSF and HLI during WW1.

They are not forgotten!

Alie.

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I think the RSF's problem is that their TF battalions served in 'sideshow' theatres until 1918 and their small recruitment area meant they did not raise a large number of Service battalions during the War so there is not much about them alone from the Great War period available.

Also not naming any Scottish Regiments in particular but some are not backwards about coming forward about their achievements which may overshadow those other regiments which served just as gallantly but without any of the publicity.

The amalgamation in 1959 with the HLI also means they are now lumped in with the HLI in any recent histories and the HLI raised a lot more units in the War.

Cheers

Adam

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Add me in as a Royal Scots Fusilier (not just Royal Scots, which is a pet hate of mine that there is constant confusion between the two regiments) supporter.

I am in the middle of constructing a database of names for the RSF.

My grandfather Private Matthew Abbott served in the 2nd & 6/7th Battalions of the RSF from 1915-18.

The Regimental Musuem mentioned by someone earlier had a devastating fire a few years ago which destroyed a lot of stuff.

Regards,

Alan.

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Dying Private's Message

A grand feat of endurance stands to the credit of a dead hero, Pte J. Jones of the Scots Fusiliers. he was carrying messages under machine gun and rifle fire and was mortally wounded. Ahe lay on the ground he had enough strength to wave his message to attract attention but before his comrades could reach him to take the despatch he was struck again and killed on the spot.

As reported by Mr. G. Valetine, in Ballymena Observer June 4 1915 reporting actions at Festurbert. Just a snippet I'll look our for any other wee pieces

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  • 3 weeks later...

from one of the first in 1914 to the last in 1918 as well as nearly all 'sideshow' campaigns in ww1, the RSF was at the forefront. Added to Churchill as a CO of the 6th Batt, the RSF's story could stand with any. A very interesting group of men and a very colourful history.

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The 2nd Battalion Royal Scots Fusiliers were part of 21st Brigade, 7th Division in 1914 - 1915. They and other Scottish Battalions made a very significant contribution to the success of the 7th Division throughout the war as described in "The Seventh Division 1914 - 1918" by C.T. Atkinson.

Attached are casualty figures from that book, for:-

1st Ypres - October/November 1914

Neuve Chapelle - March 1915

Aubers Ridge and Festubert - May 1915

Loos - September 1915

regards

Richard

post-2-1079310522.jpg

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This may interest ...

Captain Robert Stewart Smylie, Royal Scots Fusiliers, killed in action, was a son of the late Mrs. R. Smylie,Bridge End, Ballymena. He was educated at Ballymena Model School and Mr. T. Ferguson’s IntermediateSchool, Ballymena and took his degree at the University of London. Before the war he was head master of the

County Grammar School, Sudbury, Suffolk. His wife and three children reside at Sudbury.

This appeared in July edition of Ballymena Observer. In August editions they publish a pic, circumstances of death story, letters and several poems written by this officer.

When I've finished my July 1 trawl I'll hey some of it in for you and try to send a copy of pic.

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  • 2 years later...

Add me to the list here as well. My Great Grand Uncle was also in the RSF 2nd Batallion. He died at Neuve Chappell, 12 March 1915. I am anxiously trying to find any further information about this RSF and in particular am looking for a photograph of this Battalion.

Lance Corporal Hugh Lynch

#7312

Son of William Lynch and Jane Fulton

Husband of Agnes Agnew

Heather

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The RSF were the gentlemen from Ayr and were less demonstrative than their HLI brothers who joined them in 1959. As has been said they had a smaller catchment area than Glasgow that became an open city for many Regiments.

But lets not forget :

1st battalion were part of 9 Brigade holding the three bridges over the Mons Conde canal, and on the Marne and Aisne in 1914.

2nd battalion were with the 7th division at First Ypres, Neuve Chapelle and Aubers Ridge. Loos and The Somme,

In fact the two Regular battalions were in France till 1918, and from the start.

Rob an ex RHF

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darkisland,

I'm with you, I beleive the Royal Scots Fusiliers 'butchers bill' was about 6,000 killed in the Great War. Here is a soldier I have some information on:-

Irons,George W. Pte. No. 16800. KIA 12/08/1916.

6/7th Bn. The Royal Scots Fusiliers. Place of birth Monikie. Angus. Son of Mrs G Irons. North Grange. Mrs Irons had four sons in the forces three wounded one of them twice, Peoples Journal Forfar edition April 20 1918 her son James, Scots Greys had just been reported wounded.

I couldn't find this man on the CWGC site. He may not be commemorated in F & F

If you go to your local reference library and ask for the Roll of Honour I think you will find Royal Scots Fusiliers on it. I know there are a fair few on the Dundee Memorial Supplement. Keep shouting for your regiment, cause' our Colonels never shouted for us hard enough on the last cuts of the regiments.

Tom

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Add me in as a Royal Scots Fusilier (not just Royal Scots, which is a pet hate of mine that there is constant confusion between the two regiments) supporter.

I am in the middle of constructing a database of names for the RSF.

My grandfather Private Matthew Abbott served in the 2nd & 6/7th Battalions of the RSF from 1915-18.

The Regimental Musuem mentioned by someone earlier had a devastating fire a few years ago which destroyed a lot of stuff.

Regards,

Alan.

Alan,

If you have any blanks for Dundee men's address's they could be in the PJ supplement. So give me a shout

Tom

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Add me to the RSF list also.

See my great uncle on the rememberace list below my postings.

He was in 7th Service battalion and lasted 30 days after landing in France, shot through the head at Hill 70 Loos.

Do not forget Winston Churchill commanded 6th battalion RSF and always remenbered it very fondly.

Bill

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A view of the name panels on the Kilmaur War Memorial reflect a strong association with the RSF:

http://warmemscot.s4.bizhat.com/viewtopic....orum=warmemscot

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  • 6 years later...

My son in law's grandfather was George Bradford. He was a Private in the Royal scots Fusiliers 7th Battalion. He died from wounds 5/3/1916. I do not know where & would appreciate any info on this soldier. sheilmar

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Hi Sheilmar

You asked the same question on another thread earlier this afternoon, and I posted an answer - essentially the 7th RSF (45th Brigade) were holding trenches at the Fosse 8/Hohenzolern Redoubt area for eight months in the aftermath of the Battle of Loos, and there was very nasty and attritional day to day fighting throughout the early months of 1916, which accounted for dozens (and sometimes hundreds) of casualties every day due to artillery bombardment, trench morters, snipers etc. George Bradford appears to have been one of these. (I have given more detail in my previous post).

William

.

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Add me too, my great uncle James Allan Pte 43085 Royal Scots Fusiliers served with the 1st Batt and was seriously injured. He was captured by the Germans and released back to the U.K via Switzerland as part of a POW exchange scheme as he was no longer fit to fight. He emigrated to Vermont USA but sadly took his own life in 1935, due to loosing his wife the previous year and the injuries and terrible memories of WW1.

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Many thanks to Sheilmar for restarting this nine-year old thread - I hope that the apparent neglect of the Royal Scots Fusiliers has been somewhat redressed in the last two or three years, and continues to be.

Pals may have noticed that I have been banging on about my grandad and the activities of 1st Battalion RSF for the last couple of years in my attempts to pinpoint his whereabouts and activities on every day of the war, and I have had several dozen private enquiries, often by people who have come across my posts on google, asking me for my help or for fragments of information about their Royal Scots Fusiliers WW1 relatives, and I have done my best to help.

As Alan pointed out nearly a decade ago, people are still apt to confuse The Royal Scots Fusiliers with the Royal Scots, which always was a larger and higher profile regiment, but as I have pointed out before on the forum, this confusion was widespread during the war when newspaper reports frequently confused the two regiments, usually to the Fusiliers' disadvantage, and even the War Office were apt mix them up with personnel from one being accidentally posted to the other.

This is not helped by the fact that the two regiments were always on excellent terms - we see plenty of medal cards with men who served with the Royal Scots and then were drafted into the Fusiliers, and vice-versa. When 1st Battalion RFS lost their beloved pipe-major David Campbell, wounded at Hooge in 1915, and had no piper of a high enough standard to promote to this post, 1st Battalion Royal Scots lent them their second-best piper, Sergeant J. McNab, who as Pipe Major McNab, stayed with 1st Royal Scots Fusiliers for the rest of the war.

William

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Afternoon All.

The 1/8th or 1/9th Royal Scots ( Pioneers ) were around the area of Barastre, Haplincourt on 24/03/1918 duringb the German Offensive, and some are buried in Bancourt cemetery.

Regards Andy.

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Andy,

For Thread accuracy, the 1/8th Royal Scots were the Pioneer Battalion to the 51st(Highland)Division.

George

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