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Remembered Today:

Captain Andrew Glover Inglis


biffrocks
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I am trying to do some research on a WW1 Territorial Force War Medal for Captain Andrew Glover Inglis ASC who I have found out transfered from the ASC to the RFC.

I have managed to found out that he served as an observer in 110 squadron flying with a South African pilot William Bodley in a DH9a serial No F1010 and that his plane crash landed behind enemy lines in 1918 and he became a prisoner of war.

The plane is now in the Royal Air Force Museum at Hendon.

If anyone can add to the above or advise where I can find out about his period as a POW I would be very gratefull.

Thanks

Rob

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Dont know if you have seen this,

By this time F1010 had acquired a regular crew - 23-year-old Pilot Captain Andrew Glover Inglis from Liverpool and 27-year-old observer Lt William George Lewis Badley from Capetown, South Africa. Both had joined the squadron on 2nd August 1918. The raid on Boulay involved two formations of six aircraft each. F1010 was number five in the second formation which ran into low cloud which persisted to the target, forcing a return with bomb loads intact due to nil visibility. The lead formation did however manage to bomb the airfield. There was only slight AA fire and no enemy fighters were seen.

Found on this site

Andrew Glover Inglis

You might want to try the HOME AND POW section on this Forum, keep scrolling down the index page and you'll find it.

Regards

Brett

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Dont know if you have seen this,

By this time F1010 had acquired a regular crew - 23-year-old Pilot Captain Andrew Glover Inglis from Liverpool and 27-year-old observer Lt William George Lewis Badley from Capetown, South Africa. Both had joined the squadron on 2nd August 1918. The raid on Boulay involved two formations of six aircraft each. F1010 was number five in the second formation which ran into low cloud which persisted to the target, forcing a return with bomb loads intact due to nil visibility. The lead formation did however manage to bomb the airfield. There was only slight AA fire and no enemy fighters were seen.

Found on this site

Andrew Glover Inglis

Hi Brett

That's great and has clarified the bits that were missing. I am hoping to go to Hendon this summer to see the plane and take some photos to go with his medal.

Cheers

Rob

You might want to try the HOME AND POW section on this Forum, keep scrolling down the index page and you'll find it.

Regards

Brett

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Glad i could help, thats what its all about. Would like to see a picture when you get one.

best of luck with your search.

Regards

Brett

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Here's a photo and a copy of Inglis' record card from the Royal Aero Club Aviators’ Certificates, 1910-1950 section of Ancestry

post-16016-1216016835.jpg

post-16016-1216016809.jpg

Cheers

Sue

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At 12.30 on 25 September 1918 Capt A G Inglis and 2Lt W G L Bradley, flying DH 9A F1010 of No 110 Sqn, were credited with a Fokker D.VII (with a black and white fuselage and white rudder) out of control near Saverne during a bombing mission to Frankfurt.

For more information on No 110 Sqn's efforts with the Independent Force, RAF, see Independent Force by Keith Rennles, ISBN 1 902304 90 X.

Gareth

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At 12.30 on 25 September 1918 Capt A G Inglis and 2Lt W G L Bradley, flying DH 9A F1010 of No 110 Sqn, were credited with a Fokker D.VII [with a black and white fuselage and white rudder) out of control near Saverne during a bombing mission to Frankfurt.

For more information on No 110 Sqn's efforts with the Independent Force, RAF, see Independent Force by Keith Rennles, ISBN 1 902304 90 X.

Gareth

Hi Gareth

Thanks for that, thanks to everyone on the forum who have helped I am really starting to build up some great research on Capt Inglis. Great to put some history behind the Medal I have.

Cheers

Rob

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Rob - looks like his younger brother was also in the RFC and a casualty:

Name: INGLIS, ROBERT ANDERSSON

Initials: R A

Nationality: United Kingdom

Rank: Lieutenant

Regiment/Service: Royal Flying Corps

Unit Text: 19th Sqdn.

Age: 18

Date of Death: 21/09/1917

Additional information: Younger son of the late Andrew Glover Inglis and Helena Mary Inglis, of 7, Sefton Drive, Liverpool.

Casualty Type: Commonwealth War Dead

Grave/Memorial Reference: IV. H. 28.

Cemetery: PONT-DU-HEM MILITARY CEMETERY, LA GORGUE

The Times of Thursday, Oct 18, 1917; said "Previously reported missing now confirmed killed in action on 21st September 1917". The parents were at 16 Sefton Drive at the time

The 1901 census seems to confirm it's the same family - at that time they were living at 28 Marmion Road, Toxteth Park - father was a 35 year old solicitor, born Bootle, Lancs - mother was also 35 - born in Ipswich

Andrew G (Jnr) was 6 and Robert Anderson was 2 - both born Liverpool

Interesting that CWGC records his father as 'the late' - this information must have been collated quite late as per The Times online his father didn't die until 17th December 1927 - from heart failure following a general breakdown. He was reported to be the Liverpool City Coroner.

Cheers

Sue

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Rob

Just to add a little to Sue's post, Lt R A Inglis was killed in action while flying SPAD VII B3557 of No 19 Sqn RFC. Also killed that day were 2Lt F W Kirby in B3533 and 2Lt W G McRae in B3642. The SPADs were on an Offensive Patrol when they encountered Jasta 18 over Dadizeele. Three German pilots claimed victories: Ltn Harald Auffarth (the 3rd of his eventual 29 victories), Ltn Rudolf Berthold (the 28th of his eventual 44) and Ltn R Runge (the 5th of his eventual 8).

I hope that this is useful.

Gareth

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At 12.30 on 25 September 1918 Capt A G Inglis and 2Lt W G L Bradley, flying DH 9A F1010 of No 110 Sqn, were credited with a Fokker D.VII [with a black and white fuselage and white rudder) out of control near Saverne during a bombing mission to Frankfurt.

For more information on No 110 Sqn's efforts with the Independent Force, RAF, see Independent Force by Keith Rennles, ISBN 1 902304 90 X.

Gareth

H Gareth

Would it be possible to trace who the pilot was of the Fokker that Captain Inglis and 2lt Bradley shot down and whether they were killed or survived?

Thanks

Rob

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Rob

I'd say that the German pilot survived, as there's no applicable fighter pilot fatality that day. An 'out of control' victory was more or less the Great War equivalent of a 'probable' victory in later wars, ie the enemy machine was last seen diving away and looked to be out of control, but it wasn't seen to crash.

Cheers

Gareth

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Rob

I'd say that the German pilot survived, as there's no applicable fighter pilot fatality that day. An 'out of control' victory was more or less the Great War equivalent of a 'probable' victory in later wars, ie the enemy machine was last seen diving away and looked to be out of control, but it wasn't seen to crash.

Cheers

Gareth

Hi Gareth

Thanks for the info, you've been very helpfull with my quest.

Cheers

Rob

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  • 2 weeks later...
Glad i could help, thats what its all about. Would like to see a picture when you get one.

best of look with your search.

Regards

Brett

Hi Brett

Added the photos for you of Capt Inglis plane F1010, hope you enjoy

F10102.jpg

F10104.jpg

F10103.jpg

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  • 9 years later...

I know these posts are from 10 years ago but you may be interested in the following.  I have just delivered a a wooden military trunk to my daughter which had the name of my maternal grandfather Major A G Inglis  RASC painted on it. On looking up his name - Andrew Glover Inglis we discovered these posts which I was fascinated to read as I knew very little about him and had no idea he was decorated. He died of a heart attack before I was born. If you are interested I have a clock presented to his parents on the death of his brother Robert, made out of the centre of a wooden propellor. I also have an oil portrait of his mother Helena. My mother Robin Inglis was named after Robert. I would love to know more about him if you have any other information.

Sue B

7B103BC9-C464-4FF0-A52B-757855EAE78A.jpeg

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