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Remembered Today:

36th Ulster Division


Audax

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Any information or references to chaplains attached to units of the 36th (Ulster) Division 1914 - 18 would be gratefully recieved.

The only bits on info so far are

Rev Alexander Spence MC died as a PoW 31.3.1918 was attached to R.I.F buried Roye New British Cemetery, Somme.

Rev. Alex. Spence, Chaplain to the Forces, who was awarded the Military Cross for gallantry in the Ulster Division last year has been invested at Buckingham Palace with his decoration.

He worked for 20 hours attending to wounded in an aid post during an attack. On the following day, hearing that some wounded were lying out in shell holes, he went out in daylight under machine gun fire and brought back several wounded men to the aid post. He rendered splendid service and showed great gallantry and contempt of danger’. London Gazette. The Rev. gentleman is a son of Mr. Alex Spence of Beechfield, Portglenone

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Audax, if I recall correctly, Timothy Bowman's book "Irish Regiments in the Great War - Discipline and Morale" has a chapter on chaplains - may be of use to you.

Alan

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Rifleman Daniel Dunbar

Mrs. Dunbar, Broughshane, has been officially notified that her son, Rifleman Daniel Dunbar, was killed in action on the November 20th.

Captain D. R. Mitchell, Chaplain to the Forces, writing to Mrs. Dunbar, says: "It all happened on Tuesday, during a very fierce attack. Perhaps it may be some consolation to you to know that I was beside him at the time. He was out on top with his company when a machine gun bullet got him on the side of his head, just under the rim of his steel helmet.

"He stumbled back into my arms and I called him by his name but he was too busy answering Another who was calling the roll up above and he never spoke to me.

"In fact, I am perfectly sure he never knew he was hit. It was a beautiful death, just doing his duty with his face to the enemy and then a sudden transformation from this world to the glory which awaits him who is faithful unto death."

Deceased was formerly employed in the Raceview Woollen Mills and joined the army after the outbreak of war as a bugler. He volunteered for active service on three occasions before being accepted. He was a popular member of the Broughshane Boys‚ Brigade.

Ballymena Observer, December 7. 1917

and

Chaplains at the front

Sir - I read and hear of severe criticisms about thoe who go as Chaplains to the front. Might I ask you to publish the enclosed extract from a letter received about a young Broughshane boy who was killed in action on November 20th. Surely it discloses a fact which should silence a great deal of unfair and unfounded remarks about those who go to comfort the wounded and dying in the trenches.

Yours etc. Thomas Dowzer, Rectory, Broughshane.

Extract from letter of Rev. Captain D. A. Mitchell, CF, Minister of 1st Broughshane Presbyterian Church:-

"We have lost a lot of our bravest and best officers and men and dearest to me of all was Dan Dunbar. Strange to say, I was beside him at the time and he was fighting like a Trojan. He actually jumped up on the parapet to fire at them and tumbled back, shot in the head, into my very arms. I don't know how I have escaped nor why the Lord spares me. I have not had my clothes off for a long time and we are living on hard rations."

Ballymena Observer December 7, 1917

and

Mr. A. Spence, Brookfield, Portglenone, has received official intimation that a report has been received from the German Government that Capt. Rev. A. Spence MC, died on March 31, 1918 from a gunshot wound to the chest and was buried in the British Cemetery, Ham. Captain Spence was curate of Christ Church, Londonderry when he volunteered with the 10th Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers. He saw active service and was awarded the Military Cross for conspicuous gallantry. He had been missing since the March retreat of 1918.

Ballymena Observer, may 2, 1919.

and

Gallantry Awards

Rev. William Holmes Hutchinson, Royal Army Chaplains department, attached 1st Btn. Royal Irish Rifles and Minister of Cuningham Memorial Presbyterian Church, Cullybackey.

“Under heavy machine gun and shellfire during the operations south of Dadizeele on October 2, 1918, he helped to evacuate and render first aid to the wounded with complete disregard for personal safety. He assisted to carry two seriously wounded men from the front line to the regimental aid post, a distance of about one kilometre. He returned to the front line and continued dressing the wounded under heavy fire. His gallantry and conduct during the entire operation were marked by all ranks.

Ballymena Observer, August 8, 1919.

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Desmond,

Thanks very much for all the extra information on Revd Spence and Revds Mitchell & Hutchison. Good stuff as always.

I've also found some mentions of Spence in 'A Wheen of Medals' by W J Canning (2006).

A B)

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tommy mcclimonds

Audax

Here is one you probably will not have come across, as he never actually made it out to France. GREER, Reverend Richard, Ussher, Chaplain to 8th Royal Irish Rifles. In 1911 he was appointed, Church of Ireland, Rector for Seapatrick Parish Church, Banbridge, Co Down and when war was declared and after the formation of 36th (Ulster) Division he secured a chaplaincy with the 8th Battalion (East Belfast Volunteers). Whilst home on leave from Ballykinlar Camp in June 1915, where 107 Brigade were training, he suffered a brain haemorrage and died (23 June 1915, not yet unconfirmed)

Regards, Tommy.

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tommy mcclimonds

Audax

Here is one you probably will not have come across, as he never actually made it out to France. GREER, Reverend Richard, Ussher, Chaplain to 8th Royal Irish Rifles. In 1911 he was appointed, Church of Ireland, Rector for Seapatrick Parish Church, Banbridge, Co Down and when war was declared and after the formation of 36th (Ulster) Division he secured a chaplaincy with the 8th Battalion (East Belfast Volunteers). Whilst home on leave from Ballykinlar Camp in June 1915, where 107 Brigade were training, he suffered a brain haemorrage and died (23 June 1915, not yet unconfirmed)

Regards, Tommy.

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tommy mcclimonds

Audax

Here is one you probably will not have come across, as he never actually made it out to France. GREER, Reverend Richard, Ussher, Chaplain to 8th Royal Irish Rifles. In 1911 he was appointed, Church of Ireland, Rector for Seapatrick Parish Church, Banbridge, Co Down and when war was declared and after the formation of 36th (Ulster) Division he secured a chaplaincy with the 8th Battalion (East Belfast Volunteers). Whilst home on leave from Ballykinlar Camp in June 1915, where 107 Brigade were training, he suffered a brain haemorrage and died (23 June 1915, not yet unconfirmed)

Regards, Tommy.

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tommy mcclimonds

Audax

That is correct, he had two sons in fact. He was a very popular minister here in Banbridge and indeed in all his previous parishes as well. I have quite a bit of information on him and also an excellent picture if him in uniform.

Regards, Tommy.

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Audax,

Three Chaplains i know of are Rev's King C of I and Paton, Presbyterian.

Both were attached to the 10th Inniskillings [Derry Volunteers].

Rev King was attached to the Cathedral in Londonderry.

David Corkey was a Presbyterian minister from Glendermott Londonderry who served with the Division at various times, definetely with the 14th royal Irish Rifles.

He was a minister in Belfast just before the war and i think this is why he served with the rifles.

He was badly wounded and lost an arm but went back to France i believe.

He wrote a book called 'Glad did i live' which was about his life with a good section about his war service based on his own diaries.It was written by his sister i think as he died quite young.

I have the book and one written by his brother William who also served in France as a civilian minister with the YMCA.

In Philip Orr's book 'Road to the Somme' there is a photo of a Minister talking to a small group of men. Its a posed photo i think.

Got a question. I have recently seen a photo of a private soldier with a small silver cross on the sleeve of his arm.

Could this be an indication of a Lay Preacher?

Rob

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Rob - is Paton in any way connectec to Cloughwater Presby. Church

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Des,

No don't think so. Rev. J.G.Paton was from Coleraine. He won the MC three times and was mentioned in dispatches.

The Presbyterian memorial roll has a separate list of Chaplains and sons of chaplains and lists the three sons of Andrew Patton of Cloughwater.

Rob

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Another Presbyterian Chaplain was Reverend Alexander Stuart of Agnes Street Church, Belfast. He was killed in action on 24th October 1917 whilst attached to the 12th Battalion Royal Irish Rifles. He is buried in Ruyaulcourt Military Cemetery.

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The Somme Centre in Newtownabbey have the diary of a Rev. Wm Redmond, C of I, who attended to Major Willie Redmond (no relation) at the 108 Field Hospital on June 7 1917. I'm sure they'll give you loads of help if you give them a call.

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The Chaplain at 108 Fd Hospital was Rev John Redmond - Temporary Chaplain to the Forces from 1916-18. A former curate of Holywood.

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  • 1 month later...

Not a great deal of help I'm afraid but I have copied a link to one of my threads about my great uncle. There is a letter within from the catholic chaplain attached to the 1st Bn Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers which were part of the Ulster Division. The letter is from Father Robert Adamson.

http://1914-1918.invisionzone.com/forums/i...&hl=teofani

I have also found a letter written by great uncle from Poperinghe on his arrival at the salient in April 1918. As a good catholic he was very keen to have met the chaplain early on:

We arived in this place about 1.30 pm and we are to leave at about 4.30 pm for the line. I saw the Padre Fr Amson I think it is. He was consecrated at St. Francis Xavier in Sept '15. One of the three when the Archbishop presided. He was a very decent sort of a man. He comes from Waterloo and was for a time at St Thomas' Waterloo.

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  • 1 month later...
  • 1 month later...

Rev. Spence .. haven't got a pic of him Mark. Can you do any better from the shot you have there in terms of clarity? I.E. a wee head and shoulders?

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Reverend Charles Cambell MANNING.

Temporary Chaplain to the Forces 1914 - 18. Commissioned 2.11.1914

Military Cross (L.G. 5.7.1918)

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. When casualties were caused among three batteries by heavy shelling, he rendered valuable assistance in attending to the wounded. He was often with the batteries under heavy fire, cheering and encouraging the men by his fearless example.

Mentioned in despatches 1917.

Rector of Comber 1911 - 18

Rector of Drumbeg 1918 - 20

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Rev Francis Johnstone Halahan

b. 18 November 1870, d. 6 October 1951

Rev Francis Johnstone Halahan|b. 18 Nov 1870\nd. 6 Oct 1951

Rev Francis Johnstone Halahan was also known as Frank. He was born on 18 November 1870 at Berehaven, Cork, Ireland. He was the son of Dean John Halahan and Harriette Sargent.

Studied at Trinity College, Dublin, from 10 October 1888. B.A. 1892, Div Test; M.A. 1899. Francis was a clergyman at Armagh diocese, Ireland, from 1894. Francis Johnston Halahan. Installed rector of Drumcree 6 Jan. 1905. Trinity College Dublin - B.A. 1892, Div Test; M.A. 1899; ordained Deacon 1894, Priest 1894, curate Drumcree 1894-5, Rector of Mullaglass 1895-1905. He retired in 1948. He was listed in a directory dated 1900 Mullaglass, Newry, Armagh. He lived at the Rectory, Drumcree, Portadown, Armagh, in 1908.

Rev Francis Johnstone Halahan married Martha Charlotte Totten. He lived at Drumcree, Portadown, Armagh, in 1912?. He signed the Ulster Covenant as F J Halahan, MA, TCD.

He was Services Chaplain in the Ulster Division from 1916 t 1918. Temp. Chaplain 1915 to 1921.

Commissioned 22.9.1915

He was awarded a Military Cross and Bar in 1917 from 1916 to 1918.

Rev. Francis Johnston Halahan, M.C.,

Army Chaplains' Depb.

For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to

duty. Under heavy shell fire he organised

and assisted personally in the evacuation of

large numbers of wounded.

(M.C. gazetted 4th. June, 1917.)

Francis died on 6 October 1951 aged 80.

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Reverend Ernest Lindsey-Bucknell BARKER MA

Trinity College Dublin BA 1907

Commissioned 15.7.1915 Temporary Chaplain to the Forces 1915-19.

Curate of Christchurch Leeson park, Dublin 1908-17

Curate of St Peter's Dublin 1919 - 21

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