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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

26th (Jacob's) Mountain Battery


Trenchrat

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Hi,

Could someone give me a brief history of this unit? What battles were they engaged in and what sort of artillery pieces would they have used? I recently acquired photos of Everard le Grise Whitting who served as an officer with this battery and so I'd like to find out more about his unit. Thanks in advance to any forum members who respond.

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Hi,

Could someone give me a brief history of this unit? What battles were they engaged in and what sort of artillery pieces would they have used? I recently acquired photos of Everard le Grise Whitting who served as an officer with this battery and so I'd like to find out more about his unit. Thanks in advance to any forum members who respond.

I believe you have some information from a previous thread on the unit and individual, but 26th was an Indian mountain battery which ended up (at the Armistice) in Mesopotamia/Persia via Gallipoli and Egypt. Their war diaries reflect their theatre movements and are a bit spread out but you can get the complete(ish) picture from Kew:

WO 95/4289 26 Jacobs Indian Mountain Battery 1914 Aug. - 1916 Jan.

WO 95/5246 26 (Jacob's) Mountain Battery 1916 Feb. - Apr.

WO 95/5188 26 (Jacobs) Mountain Battery 1916 May - Sept.

? Missing 1916 Oct - 1917 Jan

WO 95/5014 26 Jacobs Mountain Battery 1917 Feb. - Dec.

WO 95/4995 26 Jacobs Mountain Battery 1918 Jan. - 1920 Jan.

I hope that helps.

SMJ

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  • 3 years later...

Interestingly this battery (Mountain rather than Mounted) is featured in Remembered Today by the remembrance of Gunner Bir Singh.

It was equipped with six 10-pounder 'screw' guns with jointed barrels for mule transport.

Shields were fitted to the guns in the Suez Canal Company workshops.

At Gallipoli the shrapnel resin was too hard causing the shells to break up badly, and so the gunners boiled the shells before use.

When short ranges were required the cartridge was cut in two to make half-charges.

The first battery commander, Major J.E.L. Bruce, was killed, as were 34 other men; and one officer, Lieutenant P.C. Chapman, died of wounds.

Two other officers and 142 men were wounded.

Mule casualties were 27 killed and 93 wounded.

Awards for Gallipoli were:

3 Military Crosses.

7 Indian Orders of Merit.

4 Indian Distinguished Service Medals.

14 Mentions in Despatches.

Useful references are:

The History of the Indian Mountain Artillery by Brigadier-General C.A.L. Graham DSO OBE DL psc.

Reward of Valour. The Indian Order of Merit 1914-1918 by Peter Duckers.

The Indian Distinguished Service Medal by Rana Chhina.

Harry

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The first battery commander, Major J.E.L. Bruce, was killed, as were 34 other men; and one officer, Lieutenant P.C. Chapman, died of wounds.

Col Fergusson got command of the brigade in September and his early 1916 account, which I quoted on the other thread, concludes with casualty figures for the two batteries.

For the 26th he has 12 killed; all other figures, including animals, agree with those which you show.

The figure given by Fergusson for the 21st are

Men - 11 killed, 134 wounded

Animals 35 Killed, 119 wounded and 1 missing

regards

Michael

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For the 26th he has 12 killed; all other figures, including animals, agree with those which you show.

The figure given by Fergusson for the 21st are

Men - 11 killed, 134 wounded

Animals – 35 Killed, 119 wounded and 1 missing

Harry,

Thanks for the link.

As far as I can see Graham and Furgusson appear to agree

edit to add: I also see that Graham acknowledges Furgusson's help in his Preface.

This from Graham -

Total casualties:

Ist(Kohat) Mountain Battery— killed 11, wounded

134.

6th (Jacob's) Mountain Battery— killed 12,

wounded 144.

Mule casualties:

1st (Kohat) Mountain Battery— killed 35, wounded

119.

6th (Jacob's) Mountain Battery— killed 27,

wounded 93.

regards

Michael

Edited by michaeldr
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