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battalion nicknames


eskimo

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Pals,

I've just been researching a battalion 25th fusilers. and it seems to have a few nicknames.

ie:- Frontiersmen, Old and the Bold, Driscoll's scouts.

It would be interesting to know what others battalion/regimental nicknames that are out there.

eskimo

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Guest spike39
Pals,

I've just been researching a battalion 25th fusilers. and it seems to have a few nicknames.

ie:- Frontiersmen, Old and the Bold, Driscoll's scouts.

It would be interesting to know what others battalion/regimental nicknames that are out there.

eskimo

Hi, I know that the 11th Battalion the Welsh Regiment (the Cardiff pals) were known as ''The chocolate soldiers''.

The story goes that their uniforms were cut from a material that was quite a bit darker than the norm.

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The 1st/8th Argylls were known as the silent 8th i believe,due to the fact that in a bayonet charge,they stayed silent,to further terrify opponents,think it would probably have worked.

Mike.

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Madtony,

Welcome to the forum, i am sure you will soon feel at home, this is the best forum on the web, any help you need just post.

There is a wealth of knowledge on here and the pals will help out anyone who needs it.

eskimo.

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Kirke's Lambs / The Mutton Lancers - The Queen's (Royal West Surrey) Regiment (Kirke was an early colonel & a lamb & lance features on the regimental badge) see http://www.queensroyalsurreys.org.uk/index.html

There's a list on Wikipedia - no guarantees as to accuracy, see: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_nickn..._Army_regiments

Welcome Madtony

NigelS

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"The Skinheads"~ IIRC the 6th Bn The Northamptonshire Regt,following an ordered all ranks head shaving by their CO,preceeding the 1960s~70s by decades!!!

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My favourites are:

1. 'Pontius Pilate's Bodyguard' - The Royal Scots. These were the oldest regular regiment (formed in 1633) and were the old 1st Foot. Amalgamated in 2006 with the KOSB to form 1st Battalion The Royal Regiment of Scotland.

2. 'The Ever-sworded 29th' - The Worcestershire Regt. In 1746 an unarmed detachment of the 29th Foot was massacred in North America, and afterwards all officers wore swords in the Mess.

3. 'Cat and Cabbage' - The York & Lancaster Regt. It refers to the tiger and the rose in their capbadge.

4. 'The Diehards' - The Middlesex Regt. At the battle of Albuhera the 57th Foot suffered 450 casualties including their CO, Colonel Inglis. Lying mortally wounded next to the Colours he encouraged the remainder to "Die Hard". My favourite one this one, it sums up what the 'Old Contemptibles' were all about.

5. 'The Red Feathers' - The Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry. In 1777, at Brandywine Creek, the light company of the 46th Foot inflicted a humiliating defeat on the Americans, who swore to take vengeance. To make it easy for them, the light company wore red feathers and the Americans were duly informed to 'bring it on'! I am not sure if the DCLI did but in later years the Light Infantry wore a red felt backing behind their capbadge.

Those are mine. I would be interested to read some more.

Kind regards

Woolly

PS. NigelS: The Queen's Royal West Surrey's were also known as Kirke's Lambs because of their rough handling of Monmouth's rebels both during and after the Battle of Sedgemoor in 1685!

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'Cat and Cabbage' - The York & Lancaster Regt. It refers to the lion and the rose in their capbadge.

It's a royal tiger Wooley,

this was the name given to the York & Lancs and the Hampshires cap badge and not the battalion as such, although I have come across a reference to the Cat 'n' Cabbage Brigade. The old 65th Foot were known as the Hickety Pips and the name is said to come from the Maori pronunciation of their title, the 2nd Y&L carried on the name.

Many regiment and battlion nicknames came from their pre 1881 amalgamations, here's my ongoing list,

Jon

1st Wiltshire (Moonrakers)

2nd Wiltshires (The Splashers/Springers)

1st Warwickshires (The Saucy Sixth)

Dublin Fusiliers (The Old Toughs)

Welch Fusiliers (The Nanny Goats)

Norfolks (Holy Boys)

Lincolshires (Grasspickers)

1st Welsh (Invalids)

2nd Welsh (The Old Agamemnons)

Dorset (Flamers)

Devonshires (The Bloody 11th & Sanky's Horse)

Connaught Rangers (Devils Own)

South Wales Borderers (Howard's Greens)

E. Lancs (The Triple X's)

2nd E. Lancs (The Lilly Whites)

Essex Rgt. (Two Fours)

2nd Essex (The Pompadours)

Royal Fusiliers (The Elegant Extracts)

2nd Buffs (The Resurrectionists)

KOSB (Kokky-Olly Birds)

RMLI (Neptune's Bodyguard)

S. Lancs (The Fighting Fortieth)

2nd Northants (The Steelbacks)

S. Staffords (The Pump And Tortoise)

Munster Fusiliers (The Dirty Shirts)

North Lancs (The Cauliflowers)

21st Coy Royal Engineers (The Mudlarks)

Border Rgt (The Cattle Reeves)

2nd KSLI (Elegant Extracts)

Cornwall LI (Murray's Bucks)

King's Liverpool (The Leather Hats)

Northumberland Fusiliers (Lord Wellington's Bodyguard)

W. Yorks (The Old and Bold)

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jay dubaya,

Of course it's a tiger! I apologise for that I was v. tired when I posted! It is now duly amended.

Kind Regards

Woolly

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The East Riding Yeomanry were known as Wenlock's Horse, after the regimental founder, Lord Wenlock.

Neil.

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  • 1 month later...

Linconshires are Yellowbellies as any fule kno.....never heard owt else.

RAMC Rob All My Clothes--run And Take Cover etc

Qeens Own Oxfordshire Huzzars-Queer Objects on Horses

Connaught Rangers-Common Dangers

A body in Ireland made up of old men was called the Gorgeous Wrecks from the G R armband they wore.

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Here's a quote from a newspaper article from June 1912 entitled "Review at Colchester" celebrating the King's Birthday

"The 1st Battalion the Rifle Brigade- known to the vulgar as "The Sweeps" on account of their sombre uniform"

I don't understand the reference, but there you go.

Dennis

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The rifle green uniforms of the RB's looked almost black.

1st battalion Gloucestershire Regiment - Old Bragg's (after their Colonel), The back numbers.

2nd battalion Gloucerstershire Regiment - The Slashers

69th and 96th regiments of foot - the ups and downs

66th regiment of foot - the pot hooks

35th Regiment of foot - Belfast Lilies

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8th (Service) Battalion, Devons....referred to at the time as 'Buller's Battalion', presumably with reference to the local VC winner General Redvers Buller

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After 2nd B'ham Bn. (15th Royal Warwicks) transferred to the 5th Division they were known as the 'Erberts by the men from other battalions. I will award 10 points if anyone can give me the reason why.

The people of Birmingham reffered to the Birmingham Pals battalions as the 'Birmingham Pets'

Terry

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The slang expression "A right Herbert" was often used to describe someone who was less well turned out than expected or who did not behave in the manner expected. Pluralised in the case of the battalion in question apparently.

Who the original "Herbert" was or the reason for the saying I have no idea.

Much used by my late parents and those of their generation.

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DURHAM LIGHT INFANTRY -'Dirty Little Infants'

6th Battalion - The Faithful 6th

9th Battalion - Gateshead Gurkhas

10th Battalion - Shiny Tenth

20th Battalion - Wearside Pals

Sean

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I wonder if FANY has any connotations :D

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Spit and Polish Donkey Wallopers

Poison Dwarves

Linseed Lancers

Brummagem Fusiliers

by the way, there was another 'Chocolate Soldiers' battalion.

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"Collars & Cuffs" - 1/6th Manchesters (as described at least by the 1/5th)

"Flashy Fifth" - 1/5th Manchesters (as described at least by the 1/6th)

My contextual interpretation is that neither were intended to be complimentary.

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The slang expression "A right Herbert" was often used to describe someone who was less well turned out than expected or who did not behave in the manner expected........Much used by my late parents and those of their generation.

One of my father's favoured words.

I grew up being unsure if my name really was John.

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Donkey Wallopers also known as the Piccadilly Cowboys, Household Cavalry.

Some others: Tasty Blues (RHG), Ticky Tins (LG), Cheesemongers (LG).

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