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The Great War (1914-1918) Forum

Remembered Today:

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AANS NURSES WHO MARRIED OVERSEAS DURING WW1

Over 2,200 Nurses served overseas in the Australian Army Nursing Service, AIF during WW1, and of these nurses at least 157 married whilst still overseas. Unlike their male counterparts, AANS guidelines stipulated that a nurse had to resign from service once she married. The majority did, but a few kept their marriages secret until such a time as they wished to resign.   Photo: The 1917 marriage of Sister Nellie Pike and Cpl Charles Laffin  [AWM photo P07678.002] https://www.awm.gov.au/

WOMEN’S ARMY AUXILIARY CORPS – QUEEN MARY’S ARMY AUXILIARY CORPS

The WAAC formed in March 1917 and became QMAAC in April 1918. https://www.thehistorypress.co.uk/articles/the-100th-anniversary-of-the-women-s-army-auxiliary-corps/ In 1953 Ethel St John Clarke wrote to the Editor of The Age: Sir, – It is of interest at this time to recall the former leadership given by Queen Mary to women’s pioneer work in the Army. During World War 1, when the national danger became grave, the War Office called for women to enrol for the auxiliary Army Services. Th

Prisoner of War – William Harold TRELOAR – The first member of the Australian Flying Corps to be captured

Many will be familiar with the name John Linton Treloar, who during the First World War took on the organisation of the fledgling Australian War Records Section that formed the basis of the Australian War Memorial’s WW1 collection.  Perhaps not so well-known was his older brother William Harold Treloar, who became the first member of the Australian Flying Corps to be taken prisoner in W1.           Harold, as he was known throughout his life, was one of Australia’s early aviators.  He

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frev in Men and Women of the Great War

“…a most excellent nurse – one of the very best Australia has sent out.”

Sister Cawood has for four years faced the perils of the deep and the dangers of field hospitals near to the firing-line, and has shown by her gallantry, heroism and self-sacrifice that she is worthy of the great honor and distinction which I am proud to know has been conferred upon her.  We diggers all say, “God bless her and all the other brave Australian sisters who gave up everything to assist us when we badly required help.”  We won’t forget them. [Michael Adams, 1919 – late Pte 1129,

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frev in Men and Women of the Great War

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