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Remembered Today:

Northumbrian Gunner meanderings

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Entries in this blog

 

Lesson on accuracy of artillery

An interesting extract from a letter sent by 2nd Lieut. Humphrey Arden (RGA) to his old school which was published in the school magazine.   Humphrey Arden attended the Dragon school, then   Radley and went on to Queens College Cambridge. He was about prepare for holy orders when war broke out. He was commissioned into the Royal Garrison Artillery in 1915. He died of wounds near Messines 6th June 1917 whilst serving with 156th Heavy Battery RGA. He is buried Bailleu Communal Cemetery

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Territorial Force Renumbering 1917

Picked this up from a post by David Porter on the renumbering of the Territorrial Force in 1917. David says " I've looked at this aspect for several years and I'm still getting to grips with it" , so even complex for an expert !! Source: Birmingham and the Royal Field Artillery? . Some key points: All Territorial Force RH & RFA were renumbered as per ACI 2198 (Appendix 183) of November 1916 implemented on January 1, 1917. The renumbering didn't happen during the reorganisation of May

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

RA Memorial Hyde Park

RA Memorial Hyde Park

Finally this year, 39 years a Gunner, I visited the Royal Artillery Memorial on Hyde Park Corner.   Commemorating those who lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars, the memorial was unveiled in October 1925 by H. R. H the Duke of Connaught. It was dedicated to the 49,076  Gunners who lost their lives during the First World War.   The memorial was designed by  Charles Sargeant Jagger MC. It features bronze figures and sculptured reliefs depicting the Gunners activ

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 RFA John BOYD who died 26 May 1917

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 John BOYD, D Battery 312 Bgde Royal Field Artillery, HAC Cemetery Ecoust-St Main CWGC Information BOYD, JOHN Rank: Gunner Service No: 48865 Date of Death: 26/05/1917 Age: 29 Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery "D" Bty. 312th Bde. Grave Reference III. B. 26. Cemetery H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEIN Additional Information: Son of Patrick and Ellen Boyd, of Knockmo

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Sad Disaster D/312 Battery 26-May-1917

Came accross an account from the War services of the 62nd West Riding Divisional Artillery whilst researching one of those remembered on Remembered Today. In one incident D/312 battery lost two officers, all thier number ones and experienced soldiers. A tragic loss of life that removed many of the key elements for the running of an efficient battery. Thanks to ororkep aka Paul the war diary entry has been recorded on another post: http://1914-1918.inv...23 26/5/17, at St. Mein. Time 1.30pm.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier

An interesting question raised by mags "was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier ". From Tom's analysis of Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire during the Great War 1914 – 1920 it would appear that surviving unscathed was more likely as a gunner than an infantry man. If one considers that the main threat to the artillery man was counter battery fire, the infantry were subject to the same risk as bombardment of trenches and lines of communication were also pre

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Artillery Survey in World War One

The adoption of indirect fire as the main methodology necessitated the need for accurate mapping and survey in order to establish the exact location of our own guns, and to provide a mechanism to know the enemy target. At the battle of Mons, british artillery was ofter located near the infantry positions, shrapnel direct fire augmenting their rifle and machine gun fire. By November 1917, Cambrai became the first bnattle which relied on wholly predicted fire. In addition to the survey role, the

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Northumbrian Gunner Promotion

Wow !!! - interesting day on the Great War Forum. Promoted to Lieut. Colonel with my 500th post 1,000th view to the Blog this will be my 45th Blog post. Only joined the forum to get a bit more information about my Regiment - now developing a deep interest in the Royal Artillery in WW1.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Handbook of the 18-PR Q.F. Gun

On line manual for 18 pounder Quick Firing Gun 1913 (Reprinted with ammendments 1914) http://www.archive.org/stream/HandbookOfThe18-pr.Q.f.Gun-LandService/Handbook18pr_final#page/n3/mode/2up Ordnance, Gun & Ammunition Limbers, Ammunition, and Stores.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: Viscount Alanbrooke

Alanbrooke has a outstanding reputation as a planner, his contribution during WW2 as Chief of the General Staff, and Churchill's reliance on his advice are testimony to his ability. His biography is sitting on the bookshelf - must get around to reading it. Vicount Alanbrooke. Many thanks to Andrew for detailing his WW1 appointments: Interesting that Alanbrooke was a Brigade Major and was responsible for the 18th Divisions fireplan. This was a notable sauces on the first day of the So

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: Lt Campbell Joseph O'Connor Kelly, OBE, GM, MC, MM

Interesting research from corisande and usual meticulous detail from Dick Flory WW1 --> Military Medal - Commissioned - Military Cross - Croix de Guerre Ireland 1920's --> Served as an intelligence officer and was on an IRA hit list - OBE Post War --> Spell as an adjutant in Portsmouth - seconded to the TA - court martial ed and dismissed from the service in 1928 WW2 --> George Medal in the ARP and....... a spot of bigamy !!!! Wife and Bar Web Site: Web Site: Campbell Jose

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

GWF Bloging

Following Mikes lead – will Blogging be of use on the GWF ? The new format of the forum looks like blogging may be easier. Many of the current blogs have one entry - really a request for information which would be better placed on the main forum. So will my meanderings work ? Or go the way of the rest - time will tell.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Tynemouth RGA - Siege Batteries

The Royal Naval dominance of the North Sea reduced the German threat on the coast and the requirement for coastal artillery. This coincided with increased demand for heavy artillery for the Western Front, and skilled RGA gunners to man those guns. Consequently RGA gunners from the coastal batteries were formed into siege batteries for deployment overseas. The coastal units would also provide the basis for training and the raising of future RGA Batteries. The following Siege Batteries were for

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Gunner John INSCOE, 62nd Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 15th September 1917, Arras Memorial

Remembered Today:Gunner John INSCOE, 62nd Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 15th September 1917, Arras Memorial CWGC Information INSCOE, JOHN Rank: Gunner Service No: 31730 Date of Death: 15/09/1917 Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery "Y" 62nd T.M. Bty. Panel Reference Bay 1. Memorial ARRAS MEMORIAL Born in 1895, John Inscoe enlisted in Wolverhampton Sfaffordshire. His 1911 Cenus entry records his occupati

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Psyops - RFC/RAF Leaflet Drops

Fundamentally there two ways to defeat an enemy. Destroy them, or cause them to loose the will to fight, indeed it usually a combination of both. The attritional war of WW1 ended when the Germans could see no point in going on. So why talk about leaflet drops in relation to the Royal Artillery ? In the modern targeting process Psyops is often part of the mechanism in reducing the enemies will to fight, the use of firepower being integrated with non kinetic methods. So this information

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

RHA / RFA / RGA

In July 1899 the Royal Artillery divided it's self in to two separate Corps. The mounted branch of the Royal Horse and Royal Field Artillery, and the dismounted branch, Royal Garrison Artillery. As I understand it, the Horse and Field Artillery batteries were seen as the units to be in if you wanted promotion to the higher echelons of the Royal Artillery. Consequently many officers tried to avoid coastal, mountain, and heavy artillery batteries. The latter also required officers of a more tec

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Artillery Brigades

The principle fire unit prior to 1898 was the Battery. At the end of the 19th century , the improved command and control of Artillery, particularly to allow greater concentration was seen as being vital to the effective tactical deployment of Artillery. General Marshall's Committee of 1898 declared that the tactical unit "now be called the brigade-division, and that all other matters should give way to the full development of the Lieutenant Colonels command". So the concept of a tactical unit o

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

18 Pounder Orbat

An 18 pounder detachment had 6 men actualy manning the gun. An additional 4 men were back in the wagon lines where the horses and first line ammunition was held. There were 7 drivers for the gun and ammunition limbers. In addition to these 17 men (commanded by a Sergeant) there would have been 15 horses. This slide may help: Source: RFA

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl


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