Jump to content
Great War Forum

Remembered Today:

Northumbrian Gunner meanderings

  • entries
    210
  • comments
    32
  • views
    38,644

About this blog

Royal Artillery information

 

 

Entries in this blog

Camel Artillery - Mountain Battery HKS-RGA

Camel Artillery - Mountain Battery HKS-RGA

The Hong Kong and Singapore Royal Garrison Artillery (HKS-RGA) was a mountain battery that fought in the Middle East Campaign from 1915 to 1918, operating in Libya, Egypt, Sinai, Palestine and Jordan. It was equipped with mountain guns, initially using mules as transport, before switching to use camels  in December 1916.   The HKS-RGA manned coastal batteries in Hong Kong, Singapore and Mauritius. A mountain battery was formed in Hong Kong in 1912 using Indian Army personnel. In N

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

45 Siege Battery

45 Siege Battery

A very interesting sight recording 45th Siege Battery during the Great War. The site is dedicated to Gunner A H Deadman who served with the Battery.   45th Siege Battery R.G.A.   The Battery was equipped  with two 9.2 inch mark VI rail guns which were constructed from surplus naval guns mounted on railway platforms by the Elswick  Ordnance Company, Newcastle upon Tyne.     The 45th Siege Battery was formed 17th July 1915 at Sheerness from half of 18

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

RGA Batteries with French Guns

RGA Batteries with French Guns

Whilst researching Richards Battery RGA it transpired  they were equipped with French Guns. Thanks to the help of GWF Pals I found out  two Siege Batteries, the 105th and 106th were also initially equipped with French guns. It became apparent all three batteries experience of manning French Guns was intertwined.     The 105th and 106thSiege Batteries deployed to the Western Front with personnel only. They arrived in theatre on 17th May 1916 and proceeded to Le Parcq, 30 miles east of

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Richards Battery RGA

Richards Battery RGA

Among the Heavy Batteries of the Royal Garrison Artillery listed on the Long Long Trail is Richards Battery. An unusual designation outside the normal numbering system. Once again GWF Pals had the  the answer; Richards Battery, RGA, XVII Corps June/July 1916.   The Richards Battery was formed on 16th June 1916 with details from 105 Siege Battery and the 51st (Highland) Division Heavy Trench Mortars. On the 21st June Captain Richards and three subalterns took over 3 x 220mm French Guns.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Montage of British Artillery

Montage of British Artillery

Source: CriticalPast British troops firing an 18 pounder field piece. A battery of 18 pounders lined up and firing near a tree line. Each gun rolls back from recoil after firing. British 18 pounder artillery firing from variety of places, including covered entrenched positions; open field positions; and camouflaged positions. A British 127mm (60 pounder) heavy field artillery piece being fired. British BL 6 inch 26cwt howitzers being fired. Field artillery firing in salvos

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

RA Memorial Hyde Park

RA Memorial Hyde Park

Finally this year, 39 years a Gunner, I visited the Royal Artillery Memorial on Hyde Park Corner.   Commemorating those who lost their lives in the First and Second World Wars, the memorial was unveiled in October 1925 by H. R. H the Duke of Connaught. It was dedicated to the 49,076  Gunners who lost their lives during the First World War.   The memorial was designed by  Charles Sargeant Jagger MC. It features bronze figures and sculptured reliefs depicting the Gunners activ

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

15 Pounder QF Ehrhardt Gun

As the end of the 19th century approached, the Royal Artillery was untested in general war. The focus of Army was colonial in nature, mainly waged against an enemy with practically no artillery. As a consequence the Royal Artillery was slow to realise changes in warfare over that century. The expanding empire saw the Royal Artillery engaged in many colonial actions.  Frequent small wars in Africa, Far East, India and other colonies occurred throughout the Victorian Era. The Army was engaged in a

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Choques Military Cemetery - Nothumbrian Gunners

Choques Military Cemetery - Nothumbrian Gunners

A number of years ago (January 2010 to be precise) I posted a request regarding a row of graves in Choques Military Cemetery where 12 men from D Battery 251 Brigade were buried. From   The origins of the Battery lie with the 5th Durham Battery, 4th Northumbrian (County of Durham) Howitzer Brigade. Prior to the War the Brigade was headquartered in South Shields, on the south side of the mouth of the River Tyne. The Hebburn Battery lay 5 miles upstream on the south bank of the Tyn

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder

Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder

I have spent many an hour observing artillery fire - on foot, lying in the open, in a concrete bunker, in a trench and in the air. I have never had to experience a precarious OP position such as the Artillery Observation Limber Pole Ladder. I suppose in the flat dessert of Mesopotamia with the absence of a good OP bring your own..... though being a sitting duck does have it's disadvantages. And how does one get a cup of tea sitting at the top of the pole ! The Imperial war Museum records " These

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

First Consol - Captured 12in Rail Howitzer

First Consol - Captured 12in Rail Howitzer

I was asked about some information about a Rail Howitzer captured during the German Spring Offensive in April 1918.   Source: Deutsches Hisorisches Museum   The gun was captured near Erquingehm-Lys where the British had built a rail spur to fire railway artillery.      In April 1918, the Germans launched Operation Georgette quickly pushing the British back, capturing the 12 inch Railway Howitzer, named the First Consol at Erquninhem-Lys near Arment

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

Battery L

Battery L

The Royal Artillery Association published a poem recording the action of L Battery Royal Artillery at Nery on September 1st 1914 when 3 Victoria Crosses were won.   NERY GUN     It was written in 1915 by Gunner BS Chandler whilst recovering in an Army Hospital in Cheltenham. It was written in a scrap book collated by recovering soldiers.     The 3 Victoria Crosses were won by Captain Edward Bradbury, Battery Sergeant-Major George Dorrell and Serg

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Tynemouth RGA - Siege Batteries

The Royal Naval dominance of the North Sea reduced the German threat on the coast and the requirement for coastal artillery. This coincided with increased demand for heavy artillery for the Western Front, and skilled RGA gunners to man those guns. Consequently RGA gunners from the coastal batteries were formed into siege batteries for deployment overseas. The coastal units would also provide the basis for training and the raising of future RGA Batteries. The following Siege Batteries were for

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Gunner John INSCOE, 62nd Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 15th September 1917, Arras Memorial

Remembered Today:Gunner John INSCOE, 62nd Trench Mortar Battery, Royal Field Artillery, who died on 15th September 1917, Arras Memorial CWGC Information INSCOE, JOHN Rank: Gunner Service No: 31730 Date of Death: 15/09/1917 Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery "Y" 62nd T.M. Bty. Panel Reference Bay 1. Memorial ARRAS MEMORIAL Born in 1895, John Inscoe enlisted in Wolverhampton Sfaffordshire. His 1911 Cenus entry records his occupati

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Bi-Centary Royal Artillery 1916

On the 26th May 2016 the Tri Centenary of the Royal Artillery was commemorated by a Queen's Review at Larkhill.   RA300 - Royal Artillery Tercentenary - Royal Review   To commemorate the  Bi-Centenary on 26th May 1916 a parade was held at Woolwich adjacent to St George's Garrison Church.       What of the Royal Regiment of May 1916……   The strength was over 408,000 officers and OR's, representing nearly 14% of the Army. Of the strength, 321,000

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

12 inch Rail Gun firing

I wrote a post a while ago on Railway Artillery   Just came accross the clip below which shows the loading, laying and firing of a 12 inch railway gun. http://www.criticalpast.com/video/65675024075_Battle-of-Arras_12-inch-naval-gun_ammunition-loaded_gun-is-fired

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Artillery Survey in World War One

The adoption of indirect fire as the main methodology necessitated the need for accurate mapping and survey in order to establish the exact location of our own guns, and to provide a mechanism to know the enemy target. At the battle of Mons, british artillery was ofter located near the infantry positions, shrapnel direct fire augmenting their rifle and machine gun fire. By November 1917, Cambrai became the first bnattle which relied on wholly predicted fire. In addition to the survey role, the

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 RFA John BOYD who died 26 May 1917

Remembered Today: Gunner 48865 John BOYD, D Battery 312 Bgde Royal Field Artillery, HAC Cemetery Ecoust-St Main CWGC Information BOYD, JOHN Rank: Gunner Service No: 48865 Date of Death: 26/05/1917 Age: 29 Regiment/Service: Royal Field Artillery "D" Bty. 312th Bde. Grave Reference III. B. 26. Cemetery H.A.C. CEMETERY, ECOUST-ST. MEIN Additional Information: Son of Patrick and Ellen Boyd, of Knockmo

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Sad Disaster D/312 Battery 26-May-1917

Came accross an account from the War services of the 62nd West Riding Divisional Artillery whilst researching one of those remembered on Remembered Today. In one incident D/312 battery lost two officers, all thier number ones and experienced soldiers. A tragic loss of life that removed many of the key elements for the running of an efficient battery. Thanks to ororkep aka Paul the war diary entry has been recorded on another post: http://1914-1918.inv...23 26/5/17, at St. Mein. Time 1.30pm.

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Lesson on accuracy of artillery

An interesting extract from a letter sent by 2nd Lieut. Humphrey Arden (RGA) to his old school which was published in the school magazine.   Humphrey Arden attended the Dragon school, then   Radley and went on to Queens College Cambridge. He was about prepare for holy orders when war broke out. He was commissioned into the Royal Garrison Artillery in 1915. He died of wounds near Messines 6th June 1917 whilst serving with 156th Heavy Battery RGA. He is buried Bailleu Communal Cemetery

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

Territorial Force Renumbering 1917

Picked this up from a post by David Porter on the renumbering of the Territorrial Force in 1917. David says " I've looked at this aspect for several years and I'm still getting to grips with it" , so even complex for an expert !! Source: Birmingham and the Royal Field Artillery? . Some key points: All Territorial Force RH & RFA were renumbered as per ACI 2198 (Appendix 183) of November 1916 implemented on January 1, 1917. The renumbering didn't happen during the reorganisation of May

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl

 

From: was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier

An interesting question raised by mags "was it safer being an artillery man than a simple soldier ". From Tom's analysis of Statistics of the Military Effort of the British Empire during the Great War 1914 – 1920 it would appear that surviving unscathed was more likely as a gunner than an infantry man. If one considers that the main threat to the artillery man was counter battery fire, the infantry were subject to the same risk as bombardment of trenches and lines of communication were also pre

ianjonesncl

ianjonesncl


×
×
  • Create New...