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  • keithmroberts

    How NOT to use blogs

    By keithmroberts

    This area is not for queries but for ongoing blogs. if you want to ask for help, please go to the appropriate sub-forum in the main part of the GWF. You have been asked to make your first post in a specified location. Once you have done that, your query can be raised in the various sections of the forum. If you previously posted a request for help or information in this area, it is likely to be deleted at some point in the next few weeks or months. So if you have a reply, please make a note o
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Rossignol Wood Cemetery

Hebuterne village remained in Allied hands from March 1915, to the Armistice, although during the German advances in the summer of 1918, it was practically on the front line. Rossignol Wood was taken by the Germans at the end of March 1918 and recovered in the following July. The cemetery was begun in March 1917, by the 46th Division Burial Officer, about 350 metres to the west of the wood. The German plot was added after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the battlefields immediatel

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Categories of the UNKNOWN Cases

These are the categories that I have on my computer in bookmarks. I will update this page on a regular basis, particularly during the early phase of the "sorting into categories".   These are ONLY for the British cases here on the GWF. They do not include any of the cases on the CEFSG (here).   I was initially posting this information for the benefit of GWF PALS that wanted to investigate the case further and possibly take it to the reporting stage. I was not familiar enough

laughton

laughton

 

John Edwin Barnes Essex Regiment

I have finally written up the story for my 3 x great grand father John Edwin Barnes, thanks again for everyone's help on here that have helped make this possible, cheers everyone.     One of my “Heroes” and Favourite Ancestors the fourth in my series of blogs about my 8 great-grandparents The Life and Times of John Edwin Barnes   https://chiddicksfamilytree.wordpress.com/2019/08/17/the-life-and-times-of-john-edwin-barnes/  

chids

chids

 

La Brique Military Cemetery

La Brique Military Cemetery. La Brique is a small hamlet named from an old brick works that used to stand nearby before to the First World War. LA BRIQUE CEMETERY No.2 was begun in February 1915 and used until March 1918. The original cemetery consisted of 383 burials laid out in 25 irregular rows in Plot I. After the Armistice, graves were brought in from the battlefields to create Plot II and extend the original plot. There are now 840 Commonwealth servicemen of the Great War buried or commemo

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

An Australian in the Royal Flying Corps – Gordon ROSS-SODEN

Gordon was born on the 31st of May 1888 in St Kilda, Victoria.  He was the youngest son of John Ross SODEN and Isabella Mary HALTON, who married in Vic in 1881. His father, John, died in 1892, aged 44, and was buried in the St Kilda Cemetery. Isabella, a beneficiary of the James Tyson millions, who became associated with all kinds of charitable and philanthropic work, died on the 21/11/1924 in London following an operation.  Her remains were brought back to Australia and buried with he

frev

frev

 

Badama Post

During the night of 30/31 July 1919, a relief column of 3rd Guides Infantry marched the 20+ miles from Parachinar to Sadda. Nearly 300 men strong, the column was based on B and D companies of 3rd Guides, supported by guns from 28th Mountain Battery and 40 additional mounted infantry from the Kurram Militia. The column was commanded by OC B Company Capt John Henry Jameson DSO.  The column reached Sadda on the morning of 31 July and, supported by machine guns from 22 Battery, went into action

pjwmacro

pjwmacro

 

Aircraft Down

On 30 July 1919 a 20 Squadron Bristol Fighter, piloted by A/Capt George Eastwood, was shot down by Afghan tribesmen near Badama Post. Pilot and observer survived the crash landing and were rescued by the Kurram Militia. Both were then given first aid and dispatched to hospital via Kohat on one of Sjt Macro's Ford vans. Sjt Macro and Maj Percy Dodd (Commandant of the Kurram Militia) then climbed down to the wrecked aircraft and, under sniper fire, stripped the guns, bombs and ammunition, sending

pjwmacro

pjwmacro

 

Trouble Brewing at Badama Post

Towards the end of July 1919 the situation in the Upper Kurram Valley could best be described as quiet but tense. The peace negotiations dragged on, the tribes remained restless and Afghan troops remained in positions in close proximity to the Durand Line. On 28th and 29th July 1919 reports were coming into Parachinar that a tribal lashkar was gathering near Badama Post, with the intention of attacking the posts at Badama and Sadda or a northbound convoy from Thal to Parachinar. Major Percy

pjwmacro

pjwmacro

 

Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension

Forceville Communal Cemetery and Extension.  Located west of the French village of Forceville in the Somme region, the cemetery extension was one of the first three Commission sites to be built after the Great War.  There are more than 300 burials of the Great War in this site, three of them in the communal cemetery adjoining the cemetery.  The cemetery extension was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield who was the Principal Architect for France for the Commission.  Sir Frederic Kenyon, Director o

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Tranchee de Mecknes Cemetery

Tranchee de Mecknes Cemetery.  The cemetery was begun by French troops in May 1915, and the trench, and consequently the cemetery, were named from the Arab version of the town of Mequinez in Morocco, from which these troops had come. The cemetery was taken over by British units in February 1916, and besides its present name it was called at times Pioneer Point, Mechanics Trench and Corons d'Aix. There are now 199 Commonwealth burials of the Great War commemorated in this site, three being uniden

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St. Laurent-Blangy

Bailleul Road East Cemetery, St. Laurent-Blangy.  A greater part of the village was included in the front taken over by British troops in March 1916, and the remainder fell into British hands on the first day of the Battles of Arras, the 9th April 1917. Bailleul Road East Cemetery was begun by the 34th Division in April 1917, and carried on by fighting units until the following November; and Plot I, Row R, was added in August 1918. Plots II, III, IV and V were made after the Armistice by the con

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Ste Catherine British Cemetery

Ste Catherine British Cemetery. From March 1916 to the Armistice, Ste. Catherine was occupied by Commonwealth forces and for much of that time it was within the range of German artillery fire. The cemetery was started in March 1916 and used by the divisions and field ambulances stationed on that side of Arras until the autumn of 1917. The cemetery was enlarged after the Armistice when graves were brought in from the surrounding area. Ste Catherine British Cemetery contains 339 Great War burials.

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

June and July 1919 in the Upper Kurram

This blog has been quiet for the last month - because life in the Upper Kurram was quiet over this period 100 years ago. News that the amir had ceased hostilities and of the relief of Thal was received in Parachinar 3 June. However, there were reports that the Afghans were still holding the road to Parachinar north of Thal. 60 Brigade placed Alexander Molony in command of a small column to proceed south from Parachinar to check and open the track to Thal. The column was made up of Number 3 Secti

pjwmacro

pjwmacro

 

Tyne Cot Cemetery, Part I

Tyne Cot Cemetery, Part I.  Near the town of Ieper in Belgium is Tyne Cot Cemetery, the largest Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemetery in the world. It is now the resting place of more than 11,900 servicemen of the British Empire and a lone identified soldier of the German Army from the Great War. This area on the Western Front was the scene of the Third Battle of Ypres, also known as the Battle of Passchendaele; it was one of the major battles of the Great War.

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Petit-Vimy British Cemetery

Petit-Vimy British Cemetery.  Vimy is a village some 10 kilometres north of Arras and the Petit-Vimy British Cemetery is west of the village and a little west of the main road (N25) from Lens to Arras.  The cemetery was made and used by units in the front line from the beginning of May to October 1917. In 1923, it was enlarged with graves found on the battlefields to the north-west, and there are now three Canadians buried here from the Battle of Vimy Ridge.  Petit-Vimy British Cemetery contains

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Countdown to Great War centenary service begins

Final preparations are being made for the special service taking place in Witheridge to commemorate the centenary of the official end of the Great War. The Bishop of Crediton, Jackie Searle is to give the address and blessing at the service, which is being held at St John the Baptist Parish Church at 2pm on Friday, June 28. Among those due to attend are Devon’s Deputy Lieutenant, Mark Parkhouse and his wife, Philippa, of High Bickington. Also there will be Lt-Colonel Bill Sh

syd

syd

 

R. E. Farm Cemetery

R. E.  Farm Cemetery.  Wytschaete (now Wijtschate) was in Allied hands until 1 November 1914, from June 1917 to April 1918, and from 28 September 1918 onwards. It was the scene of exceptionally severe fighting in November 1914 and April 1918. "R.E. Farm" was the military name given to the Ferme des douze Bonniers. This building remained in Allied hands until April 1918. In December 1914 the 1st Dorsets began a cemetery (No.1) on the east side of the farm, which was used by fighting units and fie

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Potijze Château Lawn and Grounds Cemeteries

Potijze Château Lawn and Grounds Cemeteries (The Potijze Chateau Cemeteries). The old chateau grounds at Potijze are the site of three Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries containing over 850 Commonwealth burials of the Great War. Potijze Chateau Grounds, Potijze Chateau Lawn, and Potijze Chateau Wood cemeteries were all formed in the spring of 1915 and used for the burial of Commonwealth soldiers until 1918. The architectural features of the cemeteries were designed by Sir Reginald Blo

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Potijze Château Wood Cemetery

Potijze Château Wood Cemetery. The Potijze Chateau Cemeteries. The old chateau grounds at Potijze are the site of three Commonwealth War Graves Commission cemeteries containing over 850 Commonwealth burials of the Great War. Potijze Chateau Grounds, Potijze Chateau Lawn, and Potijze Chateau Wood cemeteries were all formed in the spring of 1915 and used for the burial of Commonwealth soldiers until 1918. The architectural features of the cemeteries were designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield in the 1

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

 

Potijze Burial Ground

Potijze Burial Ground. Potijze was within the Allied lines during practically the whole of the First Word War and although subject to incessant shell fire, Potijze Chateau contained an Advanced Dressing Station. Potijze Burial Ground Cemetery was used from April 1915 to October 1918. There are now 584 Commonwealth burials of the Great War within the cemetery. The cemetery was designed by Sir Reginald Blomfield.

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

Devons still fighting in Russia months after war ends

Devons still fighting in Russia months after war ends

A special service is being held at Witheridge Parish Church in Devon at 2pm on Friday, June 28 to commemorate the centenary of the official end of the Great War. Here, in the run-up to the event, I look at how Devon's soldiers were still engaged in fighting in North Russia many months after the end of the Great War. As peace was celebrated across Britain in the summer of 1919, few of the hundreds of thousand revellers in Devon were aware that some of their soldiers were still fighting fo

syd

syd

 

Warlencourt British Cemetery

Warlencourt, the Butte de Warlencourt and Eaucourt-L'Abbaye were the scene of very fierce fighting in 1916. Eaucourt was taken by the 47th (London) Division early in October. The Butte (a Roman mound of excavated chalk, about 17 metres high, once covered with pines) was attacked by that and other divisions, but it was not relinquished by the Germans until the following 26 February, when they withdrew to the Hindenburg Line. The 51st (Highland) Division fought a delaying action here on 25 March 1

ejwalshe

ejwalshe

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